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I was reading about high siding and the article mentioned to help avoid it you should learn not to overbrake and not to chop your power. Can anyone tell me what it means to not chop your power? Any other tips?
 

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Chop your power - let off the throttle immediately.

Motorcycling is all about throttle, clutch, brake control. Over do one, and it usually means trouble.
 

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Ever downshift to far to fast and feel like someone just pulled back on you like training a dog to walk on a leash?

Yeah?


Well, Don't do that.
 

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Used to ride dirt bikes quite a bit. Some guy said that the experience in riding dirt bikes would help in riding a cruiser. I thought he was a little misguided at the time. Well................I was cruising about 40 one day, when a retard turned left in front of me. I was not in tune with the bike as much as I am now and even though I applied both brakes... over braked the rear. The rear of the bike hung out about 45 degrees. If I would have eased up on the rear, I would have high sided my person into the pavement. As it happened, I contersteered, the bike straighted up and I eased of on the rear brake when the bike straightened up. I chased the guy into the parking lot and demomstrated my skill with the English language as he sat wide eyed behind his locked doors of his SUV. I then went home and threw my underwear in the trash..
 

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High siding is most likely to happen when you lose traction on a corner and the rear wheel spins free. Cut back hard on the gas and the rear wheel grabs hard and flips you right off and the bike flips too. Hope you have a helmet on because you will hit your head.

A more important thing to remember is if you are in a tight turn and realize you are running out of room do not back of the gas hard or the bike will stand right up and off the road or across into the other lane you go. Might even flip you too. You have to ease the throttle and counter-steer those pegs to the pavement.
 

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One of Four
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Never high sided on a street bike but I can tell you it sucks on a dirt bike. Ever see Wiley E. Coyote catapulted straight into the ground? Like that. Anything that starts the bike into a slide and suddenly gets traction is bad. Like locking up the brake, sliding and releaseing the brake instead of keeping it locked up until you stop or crash. Either way high side = bad in my book.
 

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2 Wheel Junkie
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Basically, of you chop the throttle while leaning in a turn the compression braking from the engine can cause the rear wheel to lose traction momentarily. When the rear tire regains traction the bike whips upright and viola!.....a highside. Trust me, a lowside (losing the front wheel in a turn) is much less painfull than a highside (trackdays have allowed me to experience both). If you are just travelling in a straight line however, Locking up the rear tire is easier to control than locking the front.
 

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Thanks for posting all these riding tips guys, great to get a reminder now and then of things you "know" but forget to use when the time comes :eek:
 

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A more important thing to remember is if you are in a tight turn and realize you are running out of room do not back of the gas hard or the bike will stand right up and off the road or across into the other lane you go. Might even flip you too. You have to ease the throttle and counter-steer those pegs to the pavement.
In the situtaion above, Do you advise any rear braking as well? or just ease off throttle and countersteer?
 

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In the situtaion above, Do you advise any rear braking as well? or just ease off throttle and countersteer?
My experience is: if you aren't dragging something on the pavement then you have more lean available. Push that bar and look thru the turn. IMHO, that moment of panic while in a turn isn't b/c you're too fast to make the turn. It's b/c you've exceeded you're comfort level of lean for that turn. But just b/c you're uncomfortable doing it doesn't mean the bike won't physically do it. Don't hold back. Just push the bar and lean more. You may have to stop to clean out your Fruit-of-the-looms, but it's better than alternative.
 

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BACK ON TWO WHEELS
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If you do high side, you won't forget it!
 

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In the situtaion above, Do you advise any rear braking as well? or just ease off throttle and countersteer?
I try not to use the brakes late in a turn. Not to say that I wouldn’t use them in an emergency like upcoming debris or an obstruction in the way. Use only the rear brake and you increase the chance of high siding. If you are forced to brake deep in a turn (avoid, avoid, avoid) apply both brakes gingerly and counter-steer more pressure. Force the pegs to the pavement. Your front brake, applied lightly, should not cause the wheel to slide due to increased pressure to the road. If you are on a wet spot, oil spot or loose debris like sand the front wheel will slip and drop you quickly. The back brake used alone is more likely to slip or slide out a maybe causing a high side. Just don’t panic! Underwear is cheap.

Even if you are riding very conservatively, you may someday find yourself emergency braking in a corner situation. Picture you’re coming around a nice sweeping turn and at the other end is some farmer’s herd of sheep crossing the road. Or worse, a whole bunch of slippery sheep dung layout like land mines. One time in the delta region of Louisiana it was a six foot alligator. The worst braking situation I ever had happened, luckily, on a straight road. It was at night. If it was a corner I don’t think I would have been able to stop. I was just riding along at a nice clip when I noticed these white spots moving about way out in the distance. I backed of the throttle a little. Then, all of a sudden, these white spots quickly turned into the white diamond shapes on the forehead of a bunch of huge black cows in the middle of the road. Think about that one!
 

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Deeppurple52
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From someone who has been there... When you stop hard and lock up the rear brake, the back end will skid in one direction while you steer in the opposite direction in attempt to straighten the bike. When you release the back brake, you will instantaneously be smashed into the pavement very violently on the "high side" (opposite the direction of the steering input or lean). It happens so fast that you will be eating the asphalt before you know what happens. I have done it twice on the street, both in big time e-stops. Once in Korea in 1976 when a wheel came of the vehicle in front of me rolling it. I had nowhere to go but to lock 'em up. Had on protective gear and only suffered bruises. Last time in 2005 in the rain. Cell phone yakking woman didn't notice the car in front of her had stopped and rammed it at about 35 mph, no warning, no brake lights, just Oh Sh*t! Same scenario as the first. I am a dedicated swerver and avoid panic stops if at all possible. When you ride everyday sometimes it happens. I have trained myself to ALWAYS apply front brake first and NEVER use the rear brake in the rain. Hope this helps your understanding. Oh, if don't like to wear a helmet or protective gear, expect to get hurt. The last one cracked my helmet and scarred up my leathers but I was otherwise fine. Let's be careful out there!
 

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From someone who has been there... When you stop hard and lock up the rear brake, the back end will skid in one direction while you steer in the opposite direction in attempt to straighten the bike. When you release the back brake, you will instantaneously be smashed into the pavement very violently on the "high side" (opposite the direction of the steering input or lean). It happens so fast that you will be eating the asphalt before you know what happens. I have done it twice on the street, both in big time e-stops. Once in Korea in 1976 when a wheel came of the vehicle in front of me rolling it. I had nowhere to go but to lock 'em up. Had on protective gear and only suffered bruises. Last time in 2005 in the rain. Cell phone yakking woman didn't notice the car in front of her had stopped and rammed it at about 35 mph, no warning, no brake lights, just Oh Sh*t! Same scenario as the first. I am a dedicated swerver and avoid panic stops if at all possible. When you ride everyday sometimes it happens. I have trained myself to ALWAYS apply front brake first and NEVER use the rear brake in the rain. Hope this helps your understanding. Oh, if don't like to wear a helmet or protective gear, expect to get hurt. The last one cracked my helmet and scarred up my leathers but I was otherwise fine. Let's be careful out there!
Ditto Deeppurple, In the early 70s, I use to fly down the street in front of my parents house, and slam on the rear brakes so the tire would lay rubber.

I did it once to show off for a girl friend that was waching me, but I hit the brake to soon for the effect I wanted, and so I let off the brake while it was sliding. It all happened so fast, I didn't know what hit me. I went high side and the bike almost hit me from behind.

Like you, I had no gear on, hell we didn't even wear gear in those days. I got a little bruised, mostly ego, but the bike spent a few weeks in the shop.

What happens is the rear wheel can't re align itself with the front wheel when it's skidding. The best thing to do if you lock that rear wheel, is ride it out till the bike stops. If you lock the front wheel, you can gently let off of the brake to re gain control, but gently.

D
 
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