Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
devil in god's country
Joined
·
11,098 Posts
it is a feeling of freedom you will hard pressed to find a fair comparison to.
personally i had to learn on my own,but as i'm sure many will say.

take the MSF training class.
it will help you to become a good rider for a beginner.
after that there will be many other options to make you a better rider.

by no means is it an easy task to take flight on a cycle.

you will be back to baby steps in how to keep yourself under control.



how did you 1st lear??..just got on an off u went?? i never road one before and actually kinda nervous, what do you compare the feeling to?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
It's no big deal starting for the first time. Just sit on it, get used to the controls, then put it into first gear and play with the clutch and throttle for a bit, then just take off with your feet off the pegs. If you feel like ur gonna fall while turning, just give it a little more gas.
 

·
rain is here
Joined
·
2,793 Posts
I would encourage you to look into the motorcycle safety foundation beginner course.

for a small fee you can take the class, they provide the bikes so if you decide motorcycling isnt for you you have not made a huge investment.

also just because bikes have engines in the ccs (compared to the liters like a mustang 5.0) keep in mind that a 600cc bike is (in my oppinion) no begginer bike! it has plenty of engine power to get you to where you want to go with some power left over.

The experience is undescribable. I am now making the trasition into cars and I can tell you cars feel cramped and enclosed. I have an almost claustrophobic feeling! the funny thing is I don't get that with elevators.., but in a car I feel very caged in... having said that I think a motorcycle makes you feel total freedom. yes they are dangerous, but they are machines they are only as dangerous as the owner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
The first time I rode one was at my MSF class back in 97. A couple days later I got my EX500 and off I went.

My boss at the dealership I work for has 5 dirt bikes and he invites a bunch of us "parts dept" guys to his place to ride on Sundays. I just got back about an hour ago and am just now starting to relax.

I've been a street rider for over ten years now, so this dirt thing kind of freaks me out. I'm slowly starting to come to terms with the severe lack of grip that comes with riding dirt. That and the tall bikes. I'm 5'6" and have a hell of a time getting on half these bikes. To the point that I use cinder blocks to get on and get off them.:mrgreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
I had an atv so I got the shifting down . My first bike was a dual sport and basically took it to an empty parking lot repeated my low speed manuevers over and over until I felt safe to ride it on busy roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
i have trainning wheels plus my girlfriend holds onto the seat so i dont fall over. btw the girlfriend mod gives you 3 hp
Hahha not if she's on the back at the same time. Then it's + 10sec on the quarter mile :( Hahhah

I had an atv so I got the shifting down . My first bike was a dual sport and basically took it to an empty parking lot repeated my low speed manuevers over and over until I felt safe to ride it on busy roads.
Ditto. Rode an ATV and loved it so I bought a dirtbike at the age of 13.

what did everyone do before the MSF course ????????? because I don't remeber it being around when I started riding
Less and less people are living in the country and unfortunately a lot of people have their first experience on a motorbike at the MSF course.

I wonder what % of MSF grads buy a bike within a year.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
561 Posts
what did everyone do before the MSF course ????????? because I don't remeber it being around when I started riding
The first time I rode a motorcycle was during the MSF beginner course. I've put over 3,000 miles on my bike and been riding since Easter of this year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
I do not recommend the way I learned...

I pretty much just got on my cousins dirt bike as a kid and went. I learned most "don't dos" by actually making the mistake of doing them.

I then did the same thing with street bikes. I bought my first one when I was 16 and rode it aganst the wishes of my mother. My grandfather had been killed on his bike years before so my family was not exactely pro-two wheeler.
 

·
Full Circle Rider
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
what did everyone do before the MSF course ????????? because I don't remeber it being around when I started riding
Don't know about everyone else, but I fell a lot. Of course that was on my dirt/street bike. But the basic answer is that I had to learn to ride on my own and suffer the pitfalls of dropping my own bike instead of someone elses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I kinda just rode one when I was a kid and picked it up from there.

A friend of mine stole a 86 KLR from the ghetto (i think it was a KLR) and we all took turns riding it around on a backroad until we blew the piston ring. We all had no form of protection on and just crashed it everywhere. I highsided it at 45 and walked away with deep scars and my other friends all had low speed drops. Now I'm the only one riding, I've taken the MSF before I got back on the streets though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
I pretty much just got on my cousins dirt bike as a kid and went. I learned most "don't dos" by actually making the mistake of doing them.
Exactly. Its impossible to enforce but every new street rider should have to ride in the dirt for a year. The skills and reflexes (and scars!) you learn at 50mph in a gravel pit will stay with you forever, making you a better rider in the process.

A friend of mine stole a 86 KLR from the ghetto (i think it was a KLR) and we all took turns riding it around on a backroad until we blew the piston ring. We all had no form of protection on and just crashed it everywhere. I highsided it at 45 and walked away with deep scars and my other friends all had low speed drops. Now I'm the only one riding, I've taken the MSF before I got back on the streets though.
So you stole someone's bike as a kid and tore the **** out of it? Moto-karma is going to catch up to you, my friend...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Take the MSF course, then play in parking lots until you feel confident enough in your skills. Parking lots get boring, but they are good for you and your balance at low speeds. Take what you learn from the MSF and use it on the road. Keep within your limits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
So you stole someone's bike as a kid and tore the **** out of it? Moto-karma is going to catch up to you, my friend...
haha, motokarma has gotten me enough times already. Like I said, after we got it I highsided it and the bike ran me down, it ended up smashing into me clutch first and stabbing me through the chest with the broken clutch lever. Fortunately that healed up but I still have a nice meaty scar. Also from the rolling I did with no gear I have nice round scars on both my elbows and numerous ones on my forehead which the hair covers up :)

Also, before I got back on a bike I figured my dirtbike experience would be enough to get me riding and I ended up taking my bike into a pole because I freaked on a turn, breaking my left arm and it took over 6 months to START healing :[

So yea, moto-karma got me :(
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
Here's how I did it -take it for whatever its worth...

I didn't have much fear of riding (even though I'd never ridden), but since getting the license was gonna be required I started looking at that side of it first.

That led me to the MSF course because by taking that course here in TX you can get your license without even owning a bike. Just take the course (on their little bike) then go take the written exam at the state office and you're done.

Next go bike shopping and when you do purchase your first street bike -that MSF course will get you an insurance discount. And oh BTW you'll learn some life saving stuff in that course :lol:

Take it real easy starting off on whatever bike you purchase because those first few rides on the street can be nerve racking. But after that the sky's the limit, and you'll probably purchase 10 different bikes over the next 10 years.

Now go forth and ride the wind :cool:
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top