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I took the clutch lever and assembly off to get powder coated does anyone know how to bleed the clutch line when i assemble it? it says it takes dot4 fluid only
 

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Year make and model...

Having 0 clue to what bike I am talking about install the master. Get access to the slave.

Pour in which ever bf the book for bike says.. Don't get fancy, since if you go for DOT 5 which is a syn, and sounds wrong, since you mentioned DOT 4, the 5 will eat all the rubber seals in the system.

DO NOT get BF (brake fluid) on any paint you want to keep!

Now I am old fashion, and don't want, need, or have every special tool there is to bleed brakes and or clutches.

I let graviety do most of for me. With a little time it works well.
Remove the bleeder from the slave, clean it inside and out. Antiseize the threads and re-install it. Crack it open, and stuff some clear tubing on it to hang down below the bike, and into a clear clean jar.

So add BF, and never let the master go dry, or you will be starting all over.

When you see bf in the clear tubing close the bleeder. Then check that master.

Next with a screw driver handle rap the bike's tubing concentrating at any connections in the line, wirking up to the master.

Very slowly pull the clutch lever IN, feeling for first contact, then pulling the lever in about 1/2 way. watch for a bubble to form and come free from the return port in the master. Release the lever very slowly, so you don't splash bf all over the place.

Oh yeah put a old towel on the gas tank...

Tap the line again, and squeeze the lever again, for maybe 8 times, each time looking for a bubble.

Then test for operation and feel. If possible watch the salve work if you can.

I have o idea if you can see the slave work to push the assumed rod it does push.

If you can see it, wait and see if the rod begins to go back in by itself. If it does then air is trapped in the system still.

Again make sure the bf is in the master, and add if you need too.

This next time so long as you can either see of feel pressure pull in the lever holding it and crack the bleeder and close it fast, still holding the lever IN.

The clutch spring will push the slave to be at retracted and thus double pressure the fluid, and force the last air out.

Do not get hot, and run that lever like a mad man. All that does is break up a big air bubble and make millions of little bubbles. Getting frothy isn't friendly at all.

Might take all of 15 minutes my way. Clean up have fun..
 

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LOL a MITY VAC is a tool you can install at the slave and create a vacuum. They work well, but are messey to clean and end up eatting paint on the tool box. They do work well though. I never had one, didn't need it, but i have seen techs with them, working side by side. They get done 5 minutes before I do.
 

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AZ's Official Mechanic
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talk about doing it the arcaic way..... (OLD) :rolleyes:
FYI - DOT 3, 4, 5.1 are all glycol based and OK to use together (they now make a DOT 4 synthetic that WILL mix with DOT 3,4,5.1)
DOT 5 is full synthetic and will NOT MIX
yes the mighty vac is a tool to suck fluid thru the system. brake fluid is water soluable so all you do is wash the stuff out/off with water after done and put it away dry. no paint lose etc...
YES COVER YOUR TANK WITH A TOWEL BEFORE STARTING any brake work. if you get BF on the paint wash it off RIGHT AWAY and it will be fine.
as said below its way quicker/easier than the old fashion way with a hell of alot less mess.
but its up to you.... stay in the stone age or come to the present. :mrgreen:


Year make and model...

Having 0 clue to what bike I am talking about install the master. Get access to the slave.

Pour in which ever bf the book for bike says.. Don't get fancy, since if you go for DOT 5 which is a syn, and sounds wrong, since you mentioned DOT 4, the 5 will eat all the rubber seals in the system.

DO NOT get BF (brake fluid) on any paint you want to keep!

Now I am old fashion, and don't want, need, or have every special tool there is to bleed brakes and or clutches.

I let graviety do most of for me. With a little time it works well.
Remove the bleeder from the slave, clean it inside and out. Antiseize the threads and re-install it. Crack it open, and stuff some clear tubing on it to hang down below the bike, and into a clear clean jar.

So add BF, and never let the master go dry, or you will be starting all over.

When you see bf in the clear tubing close the bleeder. Then check that master.

Next with a screw driver handle rap the bike's tubing concentrating at any connections in the line, wirking up to the master.

Very slowly pull the clutch lever IN, feeling for first contact, then pulling the lever in about 1/2 way. watch for a bubble to form and come free from the return port in the master. Release the lever very slowly, so you don't splash bf all over the place.

Oh yeah put a old towel on the gas tank...

Tap the line again, and squeeze the lever again, for maybe 8 times, each time looking for a bubble.

Then test for operation and feel. If possible watch the salve work if you can.

I have o idea if you can see the slave work to push the assumed rod it does push.

If you can see it, wait and see if the rod begins to go back in by itself. If it does then air is trapped in the system still.

Again make sure the bf is in the master, and add if you need too.

This next time so long as you can either see of feel pressure pull in the lever holding it and crack the bleeder and close it fast, still holding the lever IN.

The clutch spring will push the slave to be at retracted and thus double pressure the fluid, and force the last air out.

Do not get hot, and run that lever like a mad man. All that does is break up a big air bubble and make millions of little bubbles. Getting frothy isn't friendly at all.

Might take all of 15 minutes my way. Clean up have fun..
 

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QKENUF4U, Mostly I dwell in the 18th century, so this is plenti fast fer me.

You wouldn't happen to be interested in buying the London Bridge wood ya?

I am far left....:shock:

 

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AZ's Official Mechanic
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QKENUF4U, Mostly I dwell in the 18th century, so this is plenti fast fer me.

You wouldn't happen to be interested in buying the London Bridge wood ya?
dont have to buy it i see it everyday......

and

i aint in no hurry myself but i do believe in WORKING SMARTER NOT HARDER..... :biggrin:
 

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I learned on as small a master as these bikes have long ago on Saab 95's and 96's. To me this works as fast, time saved in not getting a tool I don't need, and time saved not cleaning up the tool I don't need.

If I needed one back then I would have been out of luck, since it didn't exist. There was a horrible pressure set up back then I hated, with predjuduced.

I have a big red Snap On tool Box full of Brit std wrenchs and sockets, metric and Sae naturely, but I just never needed a MITY VAC. I don't buy what I don't need, more over if I only need it once each 2 years.

I get customers still with old junk that have no bleeders anymore, and i can bleed them too, even with no bleeder, in the same time.

Some old tricks fer old dawgs still work... Not saying a modern guy shouldn't have a given tool, but there is always another way to skin cats.
 

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actually you got it wrong it's not that it's synthetic, it's silicone. DOT 5 is silicone.

Sent from my ADR6400L using Motorcycle.com Free App
 
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