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the "fun" guy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Thanks Whistle
I am getting better at working on my bikes. I was always afraid of breaking them, but being mor patient and reading manuals have helped. It has made winter a little more bearable by modifying the meanstreak and getting the old Norton ready for spring.
 

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the "fun" guy
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32,859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Your welcome!

It's a discovery period not only to learn about mechanics but also about what level of self confidence we all have. I've found if I have time to think things through...I can do the task....and having a resource like this site helps alot as well when things come to a halt.

I'll bet as you continue to work on your bike....you'll do a much better job since it's yours and you'll enjoy the rewards of your efforts.
 

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Working on your bike

Hi guys:
Ive been a mechanic for over 35 years. Fixed everything from cars to busses, trucks and even go karts. Remember one thing. If you can take something apart and most of us did that as a kid, just reverse the order to reassemble it. If you screw something up, it can always be repaired. Even stripped aluminum threads can be repaired with a Heli-coil kit. So it costs you a little more money and time. Just think of what the dealer or motorcyle repair shop would have charged you in the first place. If you repair your own bike 2 times successfully and on the third time you screw something up and have to bring it to the shop, your still ahead. Buy the origonal shop manual for the bike and any supplements they may have. Read the instructions for the job you want to do a few times the night before you begin working on it to familiarize yourself with the parts and go. Take a picture of how it was before you took it apart if it will help you put it back together. I would hate to tell you how many times I took pictures of a cars engine so that I would know, when putting it back together, where the one million miles of vacuum hoses went. Its a lot of common sense. Buy a torque wrench and go by the torque specs. you cant go wrong
 

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the "fun" guy
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32,859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Knightrider!

Since you have been a mechanic for many years....do you want to contribute a link for motorcycle repair / maintenance manuals for purchase? Maybe you have your favorites that you have referenced or still use from time to time? I was hoping we could all pitch in by doing so and help us all have some solid reference materials on our work benches.

Thanks again!
 
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