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Discussion Starter #1
Hey I have recently got my wheels under me and it feels great.
After a few jerky stops and starts and slow speed corners.
But I feel like I have got it now.
But I want to know is this how we all are doing it.( I am doing it right,
aren’t I?
I’ve had only a few hours
But what I found worked for me,
as far as braking and pulling away for a stop or a light.
Tell me if this is what we are all doing.
Firstly if the clutch is engaged,
You only move forward if your are Accelerating, if you roll off throttle
Your bike will jerk a little,
So if you wanta coast at speed/engine brake
Bc say your coming up to a light.
You pull your clutch disengaging the transmission, allowing you to coast without your bike jerking.
And while you pull the clutch you wanta drop down into 1st gear, if your coming to a light or stop.
Bc next begin braking 70 percent front And 30 percent back brake.
Until you come to any easy stop.
Pulling away in 1st gear, which is a slow release of the clutch and a rolling on of the throttle.
If you let go of the throttle to fast, and or don’t provide enough throttle, or are in too high a gear(anything other than 1st) your bike(my bike) will stall.
You don’t wanta stall.
I have an old carbureted bike.
Peoples get back to me and let me know if all sounds right to you guys.
Cheers,
old Ike new rider
 

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Sounds reasonable. It mostly takes practice to get things smooth. Don't overthink it.
 

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There is a website called MCRider that will help you a lot. (There are other riding-oriented sites, too, but MCRider is one of the best.) If you can't afford a beginner's riding course, or if none are available near you, sites like MCRider can teach you a whole lot , not only about how to operate your bike but more importantly how to stay safe on it.
 

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It sounds like you have the basics figured out but I highly recommend taking a motorcycle safety course if they have them in your area. The courses in my area provide bikes or you can use your own and it is amazing what they cover in a one week course with classes held in the evenings and week-ends. It will net you a nice insurance discount and could save your life.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well I all ready learnt the hard way.
The first time I laid down my bike.
At about the 180km mark.
On the trip-o-meter...
I was at a light on quite a steep hill,
I was trying not to let myself roll back.
But every time I let off the brake and roll on the throttle, and began releasing the clutch slowly,
I rolled back more and I had cars behind me.
I had to figure it out.
(I had not gone over this particular situation before, I Wish I had.)
I rolled back a few times maybe two and a half or 3 feet total, over 20 sec that I already should have thru the corner.
And I could not roll back again,
or I was going to the hit the car behind me.
I realized the hill was too steep for me to release the clutch so slowly.
because the time I was taking to find that place where you begin to move forward,
Was to long, and in the meantime I was rolling back.
So I was on my last try and I had to make something happen.
I know that Probably sounds stupid to experienced riders. (Use the back brake dummy)
When I realized I needed to release the clutch quicker. (Actually I should of been using my back break only, leaving my throttle hand to just to throttle.
And released my back brake slowly just behind the clutch).
What I did was release my clutch to fast.
But it didn’t stall, because I rev-bombed at the same time, I guess.
Bc I wasn’t using my rear brake, and I had to stop the bike from rolling back.(use your rear brake on a hill. In this situation)(I think).
Making in one instant my clutch fully engaged, with a rev-bomb all on a fairly steep hill.
Leaving the bike to catwalk out from under me, more or less.
Damaging the mirrors Signal lights on the side that dropped, which was also the throttle side........😒😞
The handle bar on that side was also pushed in, on its pivot
And I had no tool to tighten it.
This being so, I think that because my throttle uses a cable the change in position of the handle bar may have adversely affected my throttling.
Now its pissing rain and I have yet to make it back with the tools to fix the bars
It’s pitch black and my bike might get stolen , for sure at least water logged.
Good lord help me, could this day have get any worse?
yes it it could have, so I am thankful for it not.
I thought I would share this with other new riders, because if it happened to me.
It’s possible other new rider may experience similar situation.
And if reading this could help somebody
Avoid such a thing, then I am happy to share.

Cheers
Old bike new rider.
 

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Don't feel too bad, we've all been there at some time. I have owned 5 bikes through the years and have dropped every single one of them at one time or another.. You'll learn, and it sounds like you're already catching on. With rare exception, you should always come to a stop with your left foot on the ground and your right foot firmly on the rear brake -- especially on a steep incline. You should be in 1st gear with the clutch held in and have your right hand free to work the throttle. That way when it's time to move you can add throttle and ease off on the clutch, releasing the rear brake as you feel the bike wanting to move forward.

I will again refer you to the MCrider website. Kevin, the host of the website, has excellent videos addressing all aspects of motorcycle operation, including how to stop on hillsides and how to avoid those embarrassing and potentially damaging drops. One thing he strongly advises, as do I, is practice in empty parking lots where there is no danger from other traffic. There you can practice all the required skills of starting, stopping, swerving, low-speed maneuvering, etc., etc., until they become a part of your muscle memory. In short order, all those things will become automatic and you'll rarely have to even think about them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don't feel too bad, we've all been there at some time. I have owned 5 bikes through the years and have dropped every single one of them at one time or another.. You'll learn, and it sounds like you're already catching on. With rare exception, you should always come to a stop with your left foot on the ground and your right foot firmly on the rear brake -- especially on a steep incline. You should be in 1st gear with the clutch held in and have your right hand free to work the throttle. That way when it's time to move you can add throttle and ease off on the clutch, releasing the rear brake as you feel the bike wanting to move forward.

I will again refer you to the MCrider website. Kevin, the host of the website, has excellent videos addressing all aspects of motorcycle operation, including how to stop on hillsides and how to avoid those embarrassing and potentially damaging drops. One thing he strongly advises, as do I, is practice in empty parking lots where there is no danger from other traffic. There you can practice all the required skills of starting, stopping, swerving, low-speed maneuvering, etc., etc., until they become a part of your muscle memory. In short order, all those things will become automatic and you'll rarely have to even think about them.
Yes you said pretty much exactly what two of my buddy’s said.
Do not get me wrong I was using my front and back brakes, but I was letting them go at the same time.
When like you said, leave my right hand to throttle only, use only your rear Brakes
Ease them off as you feel the bike wanting to pull away.
Of course, right? Where was my head at?
Well it’s still on my shoulders,
And that’s a good thing.
Cheers old bike, new riders
 
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