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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought an 04' Zx-6rr (about 300 miles) on it now. Was riding around and hit some sand and dumped it cuz the tires weren't broken in. I did some burnouts and ever since i've been havin some problems. Not sure if its the clutch or engine. Got it going in 1st and after givin it some throttle, around 5000rpm the bike wouldn't pick up speed but the engine would still rev up. Also the clutch seemed to be a lot looser, I was able to almost let go of the clutch and not stall so, Me and my bro screwed around and made the clutch a little tighter and it seemed to work. Its been about a week so far and i've put about 100 miles on and it has seemed fine, I've been on the highway and everything. Today it started to act up a little bit. In about every gear once I hit about 5000rmp's it starts the same problem. It won't pick up speed but the rmps and engine still shoot up there.
IF ANYONE CAN HELP IT WOULD BE GREAT!!! THANKS! [/b]
 

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It sure sounds like your clutch is slipping. Burnouts can be hard on a clutch, depending on how you do them. Try adjusting both ends of the cable to try to get the clutch movement in spec. It may be that your clutch is worn too far, and you need a new one. I know that's bad news for such a new bike.

A clutch can also get glazed, especially if it gets hot. I don't think that's what happened to you, because you described the clutch as being loose. That sounds like it's probably worn, not glazed. But I could be wrong on that. If it is glazed, try adjusting it as tight as you can without it binding up, then ride, ride, ride. In time the glaze will wear off.

Check your engine oil level, too. On motorcycles, the engine oil also lubricates the clutch. With such hard riding, it wouldn't hurt to do your 500 mile oil change now.
Curt
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey Curt Thanks,
Also I've was just playin around with the both ends of the cable but i screwed it up. Now the bike can sit in 1st gear and the clutch can be popped up all the way and it won't catch. I've tried turning both the nuts both ways but it won't catch now. Any thoughts? Thanks
 

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I guess the first thing I'd try is to completely disconnect the lower end of the cable and see if you can move the lever to make the clutch engage. If you can't get the clutch to engage, then adjusting the cable isn't going to make any difference. You need to replace the clutch.

On the other hand, if the clutch does engage, then you just need to get the cable installed and adjusted properly. Try fiddling with it some more. A service manual sure would help.
Curt
 

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yup, shouldn't have done the burnouts my friend, it could also be your engine oil? Did you change it yourself recently and put an "environmental friendly" one in, if so that will cause major slippage
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well the reason for the burnouts was because I dumped the bike due to brand new slick tires. So my buddy told me to do a few to get some more grip which worked. But I'm gunna try your idea curt. Thanks guys
 

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Whoa ! does not compute !

With three hundred miles on the tires they are broken in, only meed about 100 miles of carefull riding to wear off the unmolding compound from the tires.

Slipping on sand has nothing to do with the tires but rather the sand itself.

Burn outs are not a very good way of breaking in a new tire unless you have unlimited funds and expect to change them every couple of weeks.

The coating from the molding process is all over your tires and a burnout would get rid of it ( and some expensive rubber at the same time ) on the middle of the tire but the sidewalls which you need when leaning into a corner would still be coated with the stuff.

Next time avoid advice from this "friend", as for your clutch issues bike should still be on warranty why not take it in for service ( just avoid telling the service manager about the burnout part of the story ). May just be a coincidence anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yea I know the burnouts do a number to the clutch/tires. I just changed the oil on the bike. I think the clutch is gone for sure cuz I can have the bike off and in 1st gear and i'm able to roll it. :( But owell I guess thats just the learning process for a newbe haha. Anyone think that I am covered under the warranty for a new clutch or to have it even looked at?
Thanks for all your help guys
 

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Well it has to be fixed anyways, if you're lucky maybe it will pass under warranty but don't hold your breath especially if you bought it from Beartooth because we are on to you.
 

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Jeffro19 said:
I think the clutch is gone for sure cuz I can have the bike off and in 1st gear and i'm able to roll it.
But if your clutch cable is improperly installed or adjusted, that could happen. I think your clutch is shot, but I'd sure try the cable first. It's a lot cheaper and easier to fix.
Curt
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey,
I'm kinda new at all of this bike work stuff. I was just wondering how I would go about checking the cable. Would I disconnect it from the handle bar and by the nuts on the lower right side?
 

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That's what I would do. Then you can move the little lever by hand to engage and disengage the clutch. If your clutch still won't engage, then it's time for a new one. If you're handy and you have a service manual, you can do the job yourself.

I think we all want to know what kind of oil you put in there when you changed it.
Curt
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well I changed it today, I went to the dealership last week and the parts/service department gave me what I needed for my first oil change, so I don't think thats a problem. I Also changed the air filter.
So once I loosen the cable I will be able to engage and disengage the clutch to see if I just adjusted it poorly? But if that fails then I'm lookin at a new clutch, right? How much does a new clutch usually go for?
 

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Jeffro19 said:
Well I changed it today, I went to the dealership last week and the parts/service department gave me what I needed for my first oil change . . .
The reason Stuart mentioned the oil is because some automotive oils cause motorcycle clutches to slip. But if you bought it from your dealer, you almost certainly got motorcycle oil, which doesn't have friction modifiers in it. Besides, as we now know, the problem started with your original oil, so we can't blame it on you being too cheap to use a decent oil.

Jeffro19 said:
So once I loosen the cable I will be able to engage and disengage the clutch to see if I just adjusted it poorly? . . . How much does a new clutch usually go for?
What I meant was to completely disconnect the lower end of the cable. Then you can move the little lever that engages and disengages the clutch. If you engage the clutch and you're in gear, you shouldn't be able to push the bike. But if you are in gear and you can always push the bike regardless of the position of the little lever, then all the cable adjustments in the world won't make any difference. It's time to get the clutch apart and have a look inside.

If you get that far, I would take all the clutch plates to the dealer. They can show you the difference between yours and new ones. Then buy what you need, and slap it back together. If you don't have a service manual, now would be a really good time to get one. And a good torque wrench will come in handy for the assembly.

Changing a clutch isn't too bad of a job. Just read the manual, take your time, and put everything back the way you found it. I wouldn't want to do a clutch change on a front wheel drive car, but it's not bad on a bike. I don't know how much the parts will cost you, but I'll bet it won't be much. Labor is where the money is. Consider this a learning experience.

That buddy who told you to do burnouts owes you some free labor on this job. But maybe you don't want him hanging around and giving advice anymore.
Curt
 

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Discussion Starter #15
AAHHHH Brought the bike in to get fixed and I just spoke to the guy in service. Said the clutch was tightened too much and smoked the plates. Wow Never thought that it would cost $500.00 for something like that, does that sound about right to anyone? And its not covered under the warranty. Thanks
 

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Jeffro19 said:
Said the clutch was tightened too much and smoked the plates. . . . And its not covered under the warranty.
It sounds like the mechanic saw that the cable was tightened up and assumed that caused the problem. From your description, it sounds like it was the other way around -- you had a problem, so you tightened up the cable. Still $500 sounds like a lot for a new clutch. I think I would try another dealer.

You probably don't have much room to complain about it not being under warranty. I've heard of clutches being called consumable items like tires, so I think lots of dealers will assume that a worn out clutch is the driver's fault, not a manufacturing defect. Besides, you really brought this on yourself when you listened to bad advice from your bud. So pay the money and chalk it up as a learning experience.
Curt
 

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CURT hit the nail on the head in ALL aspects.
as for the price...........
being its gonna be NEW FACTORY parts its gonna be pricey
plates- 50-60$ for the set
fibres- 60-80$ for the set
gasket- 15$
oil-20$
hourly rate- 70$+hr.
couple hours to install
it all adds up
you could look for aftermarket clutch kits and have them put it in for you and it MAY be a bit cheaper but OEM is your best bet. :roll:
 

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Lessons learned

Let it be repaired nad learn not to listen to your friend. Get a Service manual from Beartooth Kawasaki 1 800 556 3098 and read it before you make any more mistakes that could be just as costly. Scuffing tires is easier if you find a corner that is clean and just start normal speed and then work up to rolling on the throttle to get rid of the mold release. If you have hot pavement an dyour tires are already warm it should take several times to scuff them off, same thing for the other side. Smoking your tires is not required, for the process...
 
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