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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Y'all,

I've been trying to remove the clutch hub nut, and the drive sprocket nut, on my '82 750 project. Some jack*ss with no regard for torque settings put these on, or, they are loosened by turning clockwise? And that's the question, clockwise to loosen?

TIA,
Anders
 

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Good Question... I looked in my Clymers manual for my 82 Spectre and it doesnt say... I would have assumed its counterclockwise by the lack of direction. I will check out my other manual for my 78 when the snow stops :neutral:
 

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Hey Carl.
I had the same problem when I did my Superhawk rebuild several years ago. I even remounted the engine back in the frame for more leverage, my torque-wrench was popping at 240Nm and the thing still wouldn't budge. It could be that some dipstick with an air-wrench went nuts, but I suspect normal use causes these big nuts to tighten.
I'm pretty sure it wasn't reversed on my bike, but we should check first. What's the model number? Maybe we can look up the parts diagram and get some kind of idea.
I finally popped that &#^%@ thing off with a supreme effort, but an air-wrench will take it off so easily, that it's worth bribing a friend with one.
Good luck and let us know how she goes.
-CCinC
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, turns out the drive sprocket nut has 'normal' threads, ccw to loosen. I did not, however, get the nut off in a 'normal' fashion. After trying the heat/wd40 method, and not having access to an air wrench, I used a dremel tool. I know, don't all cringe at once :eek:. Anyway, the nut is now off, and useless. No damage to the output shaft.

I am still deciding whether I should use this method for the clutch hub nut. Right now, I'm not too fond of the idea ;).
 

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Well, you can try my method when I run into a nut from something big, like the real axle of my old VW van. I either use a front fork shaft from an old Triumph, or a lolly column ( an 8 foot metal tube thats used to hold up joists in house basements) Stick one of those over your breaker bar and you will either loosen the nut or break the socket. Its never failed me.
 

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A better way to remove a stuck nut is with shock loading.
If you use a large pipe (what we used to call a snipe), you are applying loads of torque which is good, but often the socket, wrench or bolt will break before the rust breaks free. This is especially true with smaller nuts like your exhaust header nuts.
I have had the best results with penetrating oil, and an air impact driver.
Lots of air pressure and a big 1/2" or larger driver that puts out lots of torque.
The rapid hammering action of the air tool on the nut has the best chance of breaking free the rust. Some times two dissimilar metals can bond togather and present an equally frustrating problem.
If a nut is in a place where heat won't melt any oil seals or anything, you can apply heat to the bolt with a torch and it will expand. Then you let it cool and it contracts, then heat it again, and cool again. Doing this several times sometimes helps free a nut.
You can apply brute force with a snipe, but know when to back off.
It may seem like a pain in the behind, but take your time.
Removing broken studs or bolts is a royal pain !
Now I'm off topic. I was referring to misc. stuck nuts on a bike.

For the drive sprocket, find a socket that fits and use a large air tool.
If you don't have one go to a shop that does.
Loosen counter-clockwise.

Good Luck, and watch for skinned knuckles.
Greg
 

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A hammer and a chisel works well. Make a notch on one of the edges of the flat deep enough for the chisel to bite, then drive the nut off with the hammer and chisel in the notch. Works like a charm. I've done it on the countershaft sprocket and clutch basket.
 

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re

get yourself some PB BLASTER penetrating lubricant

it will loosen the worst bolts and nuts making removal a snap :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanx Y'all,

I appreciate the xtra advice. I should say that as the engine was 'sealed' when I took possession, and the oil was clean, I do not think that rust is the problem with the clutch hub nut. In any case, I attempted the heat/Marvel penetrating oil method this evening w/o success. Upon closer inspection of the nut itself, I noticed something I wasn't expecting. The nut 'rim' has apparently been hit, hard, in 3 spots almost 120 deg. apart, I guess to make sure it doesn't come loose :). The 3 spots are flattened areas against the shaft. I think this is contributing to the problem. I may just take the assembly to a local machine shop & see what they can do?

Anders
 

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Carl,

I am in the Kawi service manual for my 750...when loosening or tightening the clutch hub self locking nut, use the holder (special tool) to keep the clutch hub from turning. I am looking at the picture. The tool has a stock number ...its called a Holder : 57001-305 (Kawi part number) It looks like a pair of vice grips with rabbit ears that holds onto the outside diameter of the gear and its in line with the nut. I can scan and email you the picture out of the book.. Tightening torque is 98f/lbs.

Hope this helps.

Heather
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanx for the info. I saw this also in my aftermarket manual ( Clymers, Hanes, I forget ). The item about a self-locking nut would explain the 'flattened spots'.
 
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