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Discussion Starter #1
I've always been into motorcycles and cars, even as a kid i was more into cars than i was into barbies...

Recently, I've been thinking..I'm ready to learn to ride and buy a bike..I've been told that the 600cc size would be the best for a beginner like me but I'm kind of skeptical...

i was thinking more along the lines or the Ninja 250R..would that be a small, less powerful bike for me..esepcially if I'm just learning to ride?
 

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I know many people drive 250's on this forum and I have nothing against it. But in my opinion, it's all the same if you're driving a 250 or 600. It's all about yourself and your mind. You can drive slow with both, hard with both but faster with the 600. Go for a 500 or a 600 straight, you'll appreciate it later on...
 

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hunnie bunnie-welcome to the board :wink:

this is a very common question among new riders-what size bike?

first take the saftey course and get your license,you will see what a 250 is size wise cause that's a popular bike for the saftey course and chances are you'll learn on that.
the 250nija is a great bike however if you are one of those folks who has natural ability
you will find the 250 will feel small very quickly and you will want to move up to the 500.
most folks want to start small and work their way up which if fine if don't you mind trading up
after a few months of riding-but that is prolly what will happen if you start too small.
base your choice on your ability and what feels comfortable to you. if you are confident around bikes then i'd say start with the 500 in the sport class and 800 in the cruiser class,remember you don't have to use all the availible power of the bigger bike just what you need - and too much is better than not enough :wink:

good luck and keep us posted and ride safe! :D
 

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Hi there hunnie-bunnie. I too am new to riding. I took the motorcycle safety course (which provided 250cc bikes) and found that I picked up on it pretty quickly so when I was ready to buy my own bike I went with a 600cc. I don't find it too big at all, so I would suggest taking the course, and if you do well with that, go for it!!
 

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I'd personally stay away from a 600 as a first bike. I have an '04 Ninja 500 and I love it. Lots of power w/o being too powerful. It was my first and if I wasn't an adrenaline junky like I am, I'd be keeping it. (Selling it ASAP for either '03 GSX-R600 or '04 Kawi ZX-6R)
 

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oh oooo! triplesec's got the fever :lol: :lol:
 

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I'd have to agree, start off with a 250 or a 500. You can always go bigger later. I started off on a Honda XR250L dual sport dirt bike, then went to a 750 Nighthawk. Didn't like the crusier style bike, so went with an '02 Ninja 500R to see if i like the sport style. The 500 is a very good beginners bike, yet there are some after market performance parts for it, though not much. This will be my 3rd year with the 500R, and in another 1 or 2 years I will go to a bigger bike: either a ZX-10R or the CBR 954R.

Also remember, the insurence will be cheaper on the 250 or 500 which will save you cash.
 

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Hi HunnieBunnie and welcome to the forum and welcome to riding. If you're not locked into a sportbike you might want to consider the 500 LTD as it's billed as an entry level cruiser and is considered one of the best all-around beginner bikes (check out beginnerbikes.com). Starting with a 250 you will probably wish for a little more bike after a very short time and the Vulcan 500 has plenty of very well-mannered power, is inexpensive to buy and insure and has a supurb reputation for reliability. It will cruise with the big boys and, if needed, will out-perform some of the mid-size V-twins plus it handles great in the twisties. The engine is based on the Ninja 500 but tuned for more torque at the low end but twist the wick and it emits a howl that's beautiful to hear.
 

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Hello HunnieBunnie:
I have been riding for 3yrs now and I am still very much a "newbie" (esp. when compared to my SO who has been riding for 10+ yrs). I tried starting on an old Honda Ascot 500 and it just had to much power for me. I went down to a smaller bike and gained my confidence and comfort; in a month was riding the 500. The following biking season I rode the 500 for a month and was ready for my Ninja 600R. I would recommend starting small and moving up. I would buy a used Ninja 250, if the sport bike is the type of bike you are into. If you prefer a crusier style bike then go with a 500. If you are not sure which style you want I would suggest going to some of the local biking events and classes to try out the difference between the two styles for your self.
 

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WELCOME TO THE FORUM!

I think something that is aparrent is that there are different types of bikes for different styles of riding...IF you learn how to ride a sport bike and understand about moving forward or further back in the saddle so that your weight is being supported by the air it's great. Some people give bad advice because they don't know anybetter and didn't like it or understand it themselves. THe FORUM is a great place to exercise...from simple questions to really deep ones like proper jetting of a carb...(for me anyway. When you are supported by the air, floating it is awesome, and I prefer it. I have however been in the rain and snow and also riding a brand X Cruiser with a full windshield and what seemed to be a lazyboy seat...it was great, but it just doesn't suit me. If you take the riding school, it will most likely be a small 250 class naked bike that you set upright on. If you have friends that have different style bikes go for a couple rides, other wise set on them at the dealers for a LONG time...then when you actually DO get your own bike remember the exercises that you did in school and practice them...where it is safe...It's fun to do them on a different size and class bike...and it will add confidence and understanding to your riding knowledge base... ENJOY!
 

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welcome to the forum bunnie,just go with what feels best to you..you will enjoy whatever you get either now or in time... :D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for the advice and the warm welcome everyone...in the summer, I'll be taking the motorcycle safety course at my community college and see how the 250s work for me... also, my friend has the ZZR600, I talked to him last night and he said he'll teach me the basics on how to ride and I can practice on his bike more after I take the safety courses...I guess I'll see whats best for me then.
 

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good for you :wink: good luck and ride safe!
 

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AIR RIDE

HunnieBunnie
There is not much I can say except you will enjoy the floating when you reach speeds on the 600. Have your friend explain setting further forward in the saddle versus setting further back in the saddle to "Balance" yourself, in the "FLOAT ZONE". Slower is furhter forward, faster is further back. It takes the pressure off of your neck, back, arms wrists...and it becomes second nature to step/push down on the footpegs when you have a bump in the road (speed bump...bad drop from parking lot to street) lift ing you off of the seat. Probably one of the most important things that you will be doing on your bike and NOT his is properly adjusting the angle of the brake and clutch handles...IF your friend has been riding for a while he may make adjustments different than the shop does...And if you are paying good money for a bike at ANY shop they should not only get you aquainted to the bike you should make them set it up for your reach and comfort. That is part of the setup fees that you will be paying for...that most people just ignore...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Re: AIR RIDE

ljangell said:
And if you are paying good money for a bike at ANY shop they should not only get you aquainted to the bike you should make them set it up for your reach and comfort. That is part of the setup fees that you will be paying for...that most people just ignore...
Ohhh thanks for that tip! I'll make sure to remember that

:)

I think i may end up getting the 500 to start ...depending on how i do with the 250 to learn on when i take the safety course... then after a while and gaining some experience..when i think its safe I'll go for the 6 *cheer*

thanks for the tips and advice everyone!
 
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