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Did your inner clutch release (#5) enter the proper groove in the outer clutch release(#3)?

View attachment 45097
It appeared to be connected properly, so as a test, just to see if the springs were working on the other end, i removed the release housing / lever and applied pressure to the pin (#6) by pressing down on it with the end of a hammer. It didn't seem there were springs functioning on the other end. Its my first time working with anything like this so i'm not sure what to expect. Its my understanding that the pusher would relieve pressure on the clutch plates by compressing the spring. It doesn't seem like the springs are compressing on the other end of the pusher rod. Does my test seem valid? I assume there can't be that much pressure applied to the pusher rod by the Release housing and a couple of taps with a hammer on the pin you would be able get the feel of the springs???

I'm seeing a bunch of information about the clutches getting stuck after sitting a long time. Think i'm going to change the transmission oil and clamp the clutch like this video suggests....
Un-seize motor clutch without removing a single bolt.

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I have never tried to push on the rod to see if I can overcome the resistance of the clutch springs but I expect you would need a lot of pressure. The mechanical advantage built into the entire clutch cable mechanism is significant. So I am not at all sure that your test is valid.

Some photos of the relative position of the inner release to the outer release without pulling on the clutch lever, would be helpful.

Your clutch plates may indeed by stuck to each other, but the push rod should still compress the springs. But observe carefully as there won't be a lot of movement.

I assume you adjusted the clutch adjustment screw on the release mechanism according to the manual?
 

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I was able to unstick the clutch today! Changed out the transmission fluid and let the bike idle for about 20 minutes with the clutch clamped down. I then tried popping it into first and failed, tried again after another 15 minutes of idling with the clamp on the clutch and like magic it worked! Got to take the bike for a victory ride around town.

Noticed it would accelerate a bit after the throttle was released, some times i would have to put the clutch in to keep it from taking off, then it would rev high for a bit and go back down.

It doesn't seem like the throttle is sticking so i guess the other option is an air leak or turning the air screw out on the carb? Just ordered some replacement gaskets, I noticed the gasket on the magneto side is damaged.

Thanks for the help on all this!
 

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I was able to unstick the clutch today! Changed out the transmission fluid and let the bike idle for about 20 minutes with the clutch clamped down. I then tried popping it into first and failed, tried again after another 15 minutes of idling with the clamp on the clutch and like magic it worked! Got to take the bike for a victory ride around town.

Noticed it would accelerate a bit after the throttle was released, some times i would have to put the clutch in to keep it from taking off, then it would rev high for a bit and go back down.

It doesn't seem like the throttle is sticking so i guess the other option is an air leak or turning the air screw out on the carb? Just ordered some replacement gaskets, I noticed the gasket on the magneto side is damaged.

Thanks for the help on all this!
You really need to get those steel clutch plates out and clean them with 220 emery. I will make a world of difference. I would bet money that the clutch is slipping, and the reason for the occasional high revs. Same thing was happening to me, I messed with the carb for 2 weeks, trying out different pilot and main jets, thinking that was the issue....until I cleaned the clutch plates.
 
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