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Discussion Starter · #201 ·
I have been told that Tremclad is difficult, but not impossible to spray. I forget which type of thinner was needed and how much to use but was told you have to get it right or it won't spray properly; gun will clog or spatter the paint instead of spraying it. You should definitely research this and maybe experiment on a test piece first or use a paint that has been designed for spraying.

I would have thought a wire wheel would have left scratches that will be visible through the paint. A brush could hide those marks but a spray likely would not. For what its worth, those are my thoughts.
Pics:
43041
 

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Option C. Electrical connections are quick and easy. Just make sure you have physical clearance for the stud and the connected wire. You can get the connectors at any auto supply house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #204 ·
Option C. Electrical connections are quick and easy. Just make sure you have physical clearance for the stud and the connected wire. You can get the connectors at any auto supply house.
I'm thinking the connector would look like the pop-on connectors that go onto the old style auto solenoids or ignition coils eh?
 

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Discussion Starter · #206 ·
Definitely replace the pawl.
Update, pawl has been replaced. Engine assembled and test ran. It does run! Crappy thing is it knocks/clanks noticeably and sounds like an old air compressor. Darn... the crank just might need to be rebalanced after I chose to wedge off that bearing a while back with a chisel. Comments?

Crap...
 

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Did you set the ignition timing? Was the piston installed with the arrow facing to the front of the bike?

I am desperately trying to think of things that would avoid splitting those cases again. An unbalanced crank would shake and vibrate but I don't know why it would knock or clank if the bearings are all tight which they should be as they were all replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #208 ·
Did you set the ignition timing? Was the piston installed with the arrow facing to the front of the bike?

I am desperately trying to think of things that would avoid splitting those cases again. An unbalanced crank would shake and vibrate but I don't know why it would knock or clank if the bearings are all tight which they should be as they were all replaced.
There are 2 apparent timing marks on the flywheel:
43059

I read (in my Clymer manual) that the points should not open any larger than 0.016 inches. I aligned the first mark in the pic with the timing mark on the cover, then set the points to 0.014 inches. The Clymer manual is for numerous Kawasaki bikes so I'm struggling to find instructions for setting the points for my specific bike.

Could my points setting be the problem? Like you said, I don't want to have to split the case again (I've lost track how many times we've done so).

I actually runs quite nice other than the clear clanking sound... I hope we didn't damage anything, we ran it for a little while.
 

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If I recall correctly (been about 45 years since I have done this), you line up the first mark and adjust the points so they are just about to open and lock the screw. This should time the bike and give you the proper gap at the same time. Then rotate the flywheel until points are at their maximum opening and verify point gap is within spec. If it is not, you need new points. Don't forget to wipe all oil off your feeler gage before checking the gap. You don't want to contaminate your points with oil.

Try this and then run the bike again.
 

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Did you go back and set the timing the way I described? Or grab a timing strobe light and check the timing with the engine running. I am pretty sure the timing is off, causing pre-ignition which is causing the noise you are hearing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #212 ·
Did you go back and set the timing the way I described? Or grab a timing strobe light and check the timing with the engine running. I am pretty sure the timing is off, causing pre-ignition which is causing the noise you are hearing.
I haven't looked at the timing as you requested just yet. I do have an old strobe timing light, I'm not sure if it's functional or not. How do I use it?
 

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Well, it is best to follow the instruction that came with the light. But assuming it is a clamp-on type, then clamp onto the spark plug wire, start the bike and aim the light at the timing marks and pull the trigger on the light. The strobe will "freeze" the marks and you will be able to see if the timing is advanced, retarded or bang on the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #214 ·
Well, it is best to follow the instruction that came with the light. But assuming it is a clamp-on type, then clamp onto the spark plug wire, start the bike and aim the light at the timing marks and pull the trigger on the light. The strobe will "freeze" the marks and you will be able to see if the timing is advanced, retarded or bang on the money.
The timing light I have is a dinosaur, hopefully it will do the job (no instructions unfortunately). Do I flash it on the flywheel? There's two marks on the flywheel (see previous pic), which one do I use? I didn't know a timing light is neerded until you told me about it, I assumed a feeler gauge was all I needed.

The service books I have are either for the earlier G4TR's or a general Clymer manual that covers many years and models (not specific to my exact bike)...
 

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Multi-bike manuals can be hard to work with. On your bike you do not set a points gap. You set the timing and that should give you proper gap. Gap is not super critical but timing is. This is why I think your timing is likely to be off.

Yes you flash on the timing mark. The first mark is for timing, the 2nd mark just tells you were the keyway is to help you line it up on assembly it has nothing to do with timing.

How many leads on your strobe light? Picture?
 

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Discussion Starter · #216 ·
Multi-bike manuals can be hard to work with. On your bike you do not set a points gap. You set the timing and that should give you proper gap. Gap is not super critical but timing is. This is why I think your timing is likely to be off.

Yes you flash on the timing mark. The first mark is for timing, the 2nd mark just tells you were the keyway is to help you line it up on assembly it has nothing to do with timing.

How many leads on your strobe light? Picture?
Ok great to know. So I measure the timing with a timing light, then adjust the points, then re-adjust the points, then remeasure, etc? Pic of my dinosaur (I don't know if it works or not):
43062


My flywheel/housing:
43063


Thanks so much for your guidance, I really appreciate it!
 

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Ok yours needs a separate power supply. I would expect it needs a 12 volt car battery or something similar.
Then you have to insert the probe between the spark plug and the spark plug cap.

There is no re-adjust the points and re-measure. Not sure what you mean by that. On some bikes you can set timing and point gap separately but not yours. You only set the timing. If the timing is right, your points gap is automatically correct unless your points are worn out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #218 · (Edited)
Ok yours needs a separate power supply. I would expect it needs a 12 volt car battery or something similar.
Then you have to insert the probe between the spark plug and the spark plug cap.
I'll hook the timing light up to our van for 12V power, or I guess I do have a 12 v battery charger.

There is no re-adjust the points and re-measure. Not sure what you mean by that. On some bikes you can set timing and point gap separately but not yours. You only set the timing. If the timing is right, your points gap is automatically correct unless your points are worn out.
The magneto plate is mounted solid by two screws so there's no adjustment there. The points' mounting plate is slotted, the points can be adjusted one way or the other in this slot with a flat screwdriver - just tighten down the screw when you have the points where you want it. I don't see any other way to adjust timing other than change the gap on the points.

Points and condenser are brand new.
 

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Two marks on the flywheel, fire and tdc. No need to have an adjustable ignition plate with a single cylinder engine. Timing will not affect dwell but dwell will affect timing. If we accept that the engine leaves the factory properly timed, then as the rubbing block wears and dwell increases timing will also increasingly drift. If we then restore dwell to factory specs timing will follow and there will be no need for slotted and adjustable point plate. Wish I could explain this better but it is a basic concept. Also understand that in the vast number of examples if you set the timing dwell spot on and then tighten the point retaining screw timing and dwell are likely to change. This is frustrating and only experience will shorten the sequence of chasing the proper setting. Always check the point cam for rust which will rapidly wear a new rubbing block. Always clean new or filed points with a non petroleum electrical cleaner. Always apply a point cam lube.
 

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I'll hook the timing light up to our van for 12V power, or I guess I do have a 12 v battery charger.

The magneto plate is mounted solid by two screws so there's no adjustment there. The points' mounting plate is slotted, the points can be adjusted one way or the other in this slot with a flat screwdriver - just tighten down the screw when you have the points where you want it. I don't see any other way to adjust timing other than change the gap on the points.

Points and condenser are brand new.

I would stick with a battery.

We are going in circles I think. Yes there is only one adjustment and that adjustment is for timing only and not for setting the point gap. When you move the points mounting plate, you are changing the timing. Leave your feeler gages in the toolbox.

GPZ is correct that when you tighten the screw on the points plate, the timing will usually shift by a small, unwanted amount. You pretty much have to learn how much it will move when you tighten the screw and then compensate for this by making a deliberate misalignment. But lets first get the timing somewhere close to see if that fixes your noise issue. You can worry about perfection later.
 
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