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Discussion Starter · #221 ·
I would stick with a battery.

We are going in circles I think. Yes there is only one adjustment and that adjustment is for timing only and not for setting the point gap. When you move the points mounting plate, you are changing the timing. Leave your feeler gages in the toolbox.

GPZ is correct that when you tighten the screw on the points plate, the timing will usually shift by a small, unwanted amount. You pretty much have to learn how much it will move when you tighten the screw and then compensate for this by making a deliberate misalignment. But lets first get the timing somewhere close to see if that fixes your noise issue. You can worry about perfection later.
Ok agreed, so how do I make that happen with the timing light? I understand that I hook up the red and black clamps to a 12 V battery. Do I put the spring connector on the spark plug then the spark plug boot on the spring connector?

Thanks for being very patient with me, I'm hopeful we'll figure it out. Feeler gauge is back in the toolbox, LOL!
 

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On larger multi cylinder machines you are given both dwell/gap and timing/ slotted plate adjustment. When the point plate is not slotted both timing and gap are accomplished with gap alone. Get the original gap spot on and you will also have correct timing.. You can use a light or buzzer box to determine when the points open, spark occurs when the points open and the coil field collapses. The best way to verify the f mark on the flywheel and therefore the field collapse and spark is with a dial indicator.
 

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I should add that in my experience though perhaps not perfect the f mark is plenty close enough to provide acceptable timing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #224 ·
On larger multi cylinder machines you are given both dwell/gap and timing/ slotted plate adjustment. When the point plate is not slotted both timing and gap are accomplished with gap alone. Get the original gap spot on and you will also have correct timing.. You can use a light or buzzer box to determine when the points open, spark occurs when the points open and the coil field collapses. The best way to verify the f mark on the flywheel and therefore the field collapse and spark is with a dial indicator.
Ok I think I understand. I hook up the light, run the bike and hold the button on the timing light handle. The light illuminated on the flywheel should overlay the "F" timing line ("fire" line, first marking, not second). If it's in time I should have alignment. Do I have it correct?
 

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Ok I think I understand. I hook up the light, run the bike and hold the button on the timing light handle. The light illuminated on the flywheel should overlay the "F" timing line ("fire" line, first marking, not second). If it's in time I should have alignment. Do I have it correct?
Yes that is correct. If your strobe is not very bright, it helps to do this in a dark environment.
 

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The KE125 manual is clearer and easier to understand as it deals with just one model, not 10 models covered by one manual as in the above. The KE125 procedure is identical unless you are using the dial indicator method of setting timing. For dial indicator setting, the distances noted for the KE125 are not the same as for the G4TR.

43066
43067
 

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Discussion Starter · #228 ·
The KE125 manual is clearer and easier to understand as it deals with just one model, not 10 models covered by one manual as in the above. The KE125 procedure is identical unless you are using the dial indicator method of setting timing. For dial indicator setting, the distances noted for the KE125 are not the same as for the G4TR.

View attachment 43066 View attachment 43067
Great stuff, thanks!
 

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A timing light will work but the drawback is that you can not check the timing and adjust it at the same time. Test light, multi meter, Merctronic, buzzer box, all let you check and adjust timing without starting the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #231 ·
A timing light will work but the drawback is that you can not check the timing and adjust it at the same time. Test light, multi meter, Merctronic, buzzer box, all let you check and adjust timing without starting the engine.
I have a multimeter, how does one test timing with it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #233 ·
Video of the clanking/knocking/ticking:

I bought a timing light (the one I had is dead) and videod the result. It's out by a little bit, is this significant? Check it out:
 

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It looks like you are using a different timing strobe light than earlier shown, but yes, leave it set at zero. You can see under the strobe light that your timing is off by several degrees. Adjust and try again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #236 ·
It looks like you are using a different timing strobe light than earlier shown, but yes, leave it set at zero. You can see under the strobe light that your timing is off by several degrees. Adjust and try again.
What's the 20 degrees of timing that the table 7 pic is indicating?
 

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What's the 20 degrees of timing that the table 7 pic is indicating?
That represents the precise moment that your points open which is also when a spark is created at your spark plug. The mark on your flywheel is at 20 degrees before TDC so you really don't have to worry about the angle. Just use the procedure outlined in the KE125 section I provided. Remember, the timing mark is the first mark on the flywheel (the one one the left). Ignore the other mark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #238 ·
That represents the precise moment that your points open which is also when a spark is created at your spark plug. The mark on your flywheel is at 20 degrees before TDC so you really don't have to worry about the angle. Just use the procedure outlined in the KE125 section I provided. Remember, the timing mark is the first mark on the flywheel (the one one the left). Ignore the other mark.
Ok got it. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #239 · (Edited)
Success! My sons and I are so happy! We have the timing just about perfect. I drove the bike around our crescent yesterday. Out to the farm today to let the boys take her for a drive.
43123

In the early 1990s, the bike was worked on at a local trades school when my sister-in-law was taking a small engines course. She said she had it running but when she brought it home to the farm they could not get it started. It sat at the farm for 25 years plus until my two boys and I took it apart, replaced the piston, rings, points, condenser, rotary valve, bearings, seals, crank pin, connecting rod, wrist pin, muffler, carburetor, rebuilt crankshaft. Tons of time (and $$$) since January 17th when we brought it home.

So it really hasn't run since about 1980... 40ish years! I've always wanted to revive her, ever since I was a kid... it's now a reality - a great feeling!

I want to thank everyone that advised and guided me along the way - I couldn't have done it without you. WFO-KZ and 1981GPZ550 - you two gentlemen were very patient and helpful along the way... thank you so much!!!

More little things to go. Maybe a new seat cover, fuel tank paint and decals, speedometer and cable. I do have a never used tire that I might install. Fork seals and dust covers - I have bought them, I just need to figure out how to install them.
 

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Well congratulations to you and your sons for having the patience and perseverance to stick with it. Give yourselves a huge pat on the back. I am sure you have learned tons of new skills and attained a lot of knowledge for your next restoration... Why stop now? You did say you had two sons right? LOL.
 
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