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dont bother buying a new one their like $350 dollars. buy a used one off ebay for $40.
 

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so do you seriously have to do all that crap that that site says or can you just replace the shock take it off and put the 650 on? badkart makes it sound like that but that site has a bunch of stuff on it and says 'its arduous and difficult' or somethin.
 

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yeah i agree the site makes it sound really hard but its seems like there isnt much to do. but i dont like having the idea of me possibly messing up the alignment on the holes and having my bike ride funny.
 

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FIRST OF ALL...I see a lot of people writing about the NINJA 250R being underpowered...I don't think that if you have really ridden one (PROPERLY) that you would have that opinion! The NINJA 250R has a REDLINE of 14,000RPM and it too, is water cooled. It doesn't have the Bottom-end Torque that the larger bikes have, but give it its due, take one out for a spin if you trust your friend riding your what-ever bike and wrap it out and see what happens; when all of a sudden the power rolls on at 9,000RPM and carries you on up to 13,000RPM...yeah, I know redline is 14,000RPM...check out the real thing...or at least if you are going to hide behind a keyboard and talk about the bike, check out the stats on the bike. The ONLY difference between Ignorance and Stupidity is Knowledge. The NINJA 250R is truely a NINJA, it is NOT a want-to-be!
Ahem, I ride one all the time. My wife's. It is slow........ not saying it's not fun, but it's slow. Yes, you can ride it to it's limit and get the most out of it unlike most bikes. But it's a beginners bike pure and simple. Nothing wrong with riding one, but please don't claim that it's numbers are impressive. You can't ride at 13000 all the time, like around town. That's when it's annoying, even to my wife. For proof that I ride it and have fun on it (away from traffic) check out this video. Ride safe.
 

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so do you seriously have to do all that crap that that site says or can you just replace the shock take it off and put the 650 on? badkart makes it sound like that but that site has a bunch of stuff on it and says 'its arduous and difficult' or somethin.
all i know is it was very easy for me.. i didn't follow all that stuff .. but whatever... i bolted one on from ebay it was very easy.. i did grind just a touch off the front top of the shock just so it didn't touch.. but it took about a min..and it has been working for about a year now like that .. and i guess it could depend on what kind of person you are... i mean i know people that thought changing a car tire was 'arduous and difficult'
 

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all i know is it was very easy for me.. i didn't follow all that stuff .. but whatever... i bolted one on from ebay it was very easy.. i did grind just a touch off the front top of the shock just so it didn't touch.. but it took about a min..and it has been working for about a year now like that .. and i guess it could depend on what kind of person you are... i mean i know people that thought changing a car tire was 'arduous and difficult'
okay. no, lol, im not that soft when it comes to mechanics. well then if all it takes is a quick grind then i think i'll look into it and purchase a shock when i get the money.
 

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Great bike

Hello all you experienced and just starting motorcycle riders out there I just wanted to weigh in with a bit of truth about the Ninja 250 after riding a 2006 model for little over a year and putting over 20,000 miles on it. If you can separate your ability to make logical decisions from your ego you'll discover the Ninja 250 is the best bang for the buck you can purchase not only in terms of low initial price, maintenance and operating cost but riding fun as well. First the reason so many people select this bike to learn on is because it's inexpensive, forgiving, easy to control and fun to ride. All in all something nice to have regardless of what motorcycle you ride. It's largely due to this popularity as a learning bike that many assume it is lacking in enough performance to keep them entertained, handle freeways with traffic moving along at 75-80 MPH, strong cross winds, long trips, enough acceleration etc. I assure you from personal experience none of this could be further from the truth. Very few riders really utilize the performance of high powered motorcycles as the real risk of tickets and accidents increase dramatically with speed. Most of the NEED many have for a high powered bike is due to the desire to be riding something they feel makes them in some way appear cooler to their friends. It's mostly about image. Riding a bike associated with being a good learning bike is viewed as wimpy in the world of 180 HP 200 MPH crotch rockets. The real truth about the performance and capabilities of the smallest Ninja is that it will accelerate from 0-60 MPH in about five and a half seconds, run the quarter mile at about 90 MPH and top out somewhere around 110 MPH. There are few performance cars or large lumbering cruisers that even running full bore can out accelerate this bike in a red light to red light race. Freeway traffic is not a problem with speed and acceleration to spare. I recently took a 1200 mile trip from my home in Orlando FL to Ft Worth TX recently stopping only for fuel and to go to the restroom running 75 to 85 MPH most of the way. About half the trip was riding in torrential rain with strong winds. If you desire to lower your operating cost from driving a car and would like to have more fun getting from point A to point B there are few bikes that will really do that after considering mileage and upkeep. I'm not saying this bike could be all things to all people just that it is a great bike for anyone.
 

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Hello all you experienced and just starting motorcycle riders out there I just wanted to weigh in with a bit of truth about the Ninja 250 after riding a 2006 model for little over a year and putting over 20,000 miles on it. If you can separate your ability to make logical decisions from your ego you'll discover the Ninja 250 is the best bang for the buck you can purchase not only in terms of low initial price, maintenance and operating cost but riding fun as well. First the reason so many people select this bike to learn on is because it's inexpensive, forgiving, easy to control and fun to ride. All in all something nice to have regardless of what motorcycle you ride. It's largely due to this popularity as a learning bike that many assume it is lacking in enough performance to keep them entertained, handle freeways with traffic moving along at 75-80 MPH, strong cross winds, long trips, enough acceleration etc. I assure you from personal experience none of this could be further from the truth. Very few riders really utilize the performance of high powered motorcycles as the real risk of tickets and accidents increase dramatically with speed. Most of the NEED many have for a high powered bike is due to the desire to be riding something they feel makes them in some way appear cooler to their friends. It's mostly about image. Riding a bike associated with being a good learning bike is viewed as wimpy in the world of 180 HP 200 MPH crotch rockets. The real truth about the performance and capabilities of the smallest Ninja is that it will accelerate from 0-60 MPH in about five and a half seconds, run the quarter mile at about 90 MPH and top out somewhere around 110 MPH. There are few performance cars or large lumbering cruisers that even running full bore can out accelerate this bike in a red light to red light race. Freeway traffic is not a problem with speed and acceleration to spare. I recently took a 1200 mile trip from my home in Orlando FL to Ft Worth TX recently stopping only for fuel and to go to the restroom running 75 to 85 MPH most of the way. About half the trip was riding in torrential rain with strong winds. If you desire to lower your operating cost from driving a car and would like to have more fun getting from point A to point B there are few bikes that will really do that after considering mileage and upkeep. I'm not saying this bike could be all things to all people just that it is a great bike for anyone.
Well said.
 

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Hello all you experienced and just starting motorcycle riders out there I just wanted to weigh in with a bit of truth about the Ninja 250 after riding a 2006 model for little over a year and putting over 20,000 miles on it. If you can separate your ability to make logical decisions from your ego you'll discover the Ninja 250 is the best bang for the buck you can purchase not only in terms of low initial price, maintenance and operating cost but riding fun as well. First the reason so many people select this bike to learn on is because it's inexpensive, forgiving, easy to control and fun to ride. All in all something nice to have regardless of what motorcycle you ride. It's largely due to this popularity as a learning bike that many assume it is lacking in enough performance to keep them entertained, handle freeways with traffic moving along at 75-80 MPH, strong cross winds, long trips, enough acceleration etc. I assure you from personal experience none of this could be further from the truth. Very few riders really utilize the performance of high powered motorcycles as the real risk of tickets and accidents increase dramatically with speed. Most of the NEED many have for a high powered bike is due to the desire to be riding something they feel makes them in some way appear cooler to their friends. It's mostly about image. Riding a bike associated with being a good learning bike is viewed as wimpy in the world of 180 HP 200 MPH crotch rockets. The real truth about the performance and capabilities of the smallest Ninja is that it will accelerate from 0-60 MPH in about five and a half seconds, run the quarter mile at about 90 MPH and top out somewhere around 110 MPH. There are few performance cars or large lumbering cruisers that even running full bore can out accelerate this bike in a red light to red light race. Freeway traffic is not a problem with speed and acceleration to spare. I recently took a 1200 mile trip from my home in Orlando FL to Ft Worth TX recently stopping only for fuel and to go to the restroom running 75 to 85 MPH most of the way. About half the trip was riding in torrential rain with strong winds. If you desire to lower your operating cost from driving a car and would like to have more fun getting from point A to point B there are few bikes that will really do that after considering mileage and upkeep. I'm not saying this bike could be all things to all people just that it is a great bike for anyone.
Also coming from going 636 and 600 to a 1000...One must come to a realization that more power does not equate to death, accidents, of anything...It means let buzziness...Less shifting...Sex appeal...Then yeah...A bigger bike is good when the time comes to stop denying the fact that once you outgrow or get over the learning process, a bigger bike is not a bad thing but just progression. Now if you ride a 250 to save cash great...If you ride a 250 because you can not afford to get a bigger bike great...In the end, a 250 has its purposes as does 600s and 1000s...It is all up to you and want you want out of a bike.

Used 250s (some) and new 250s are not deals...For that price of a new 250, you can get a used SV650 or SV650S...

On that note, I would still never recommend a 250 to anyone. I would recommend older 600s or a 650R.
 

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Berry: I will agree with every point that you made regarding the capabilities of the 250R. But I disagree with every point that you made about riding anything that is bigger than a 250.

I didn't get the Z1000 because "of the NEED many have for a high powered bike is due to the desire to be riding something they feel makes them in some way appear cooler to their friends. It's mostly about image"--I got it because my 500R couldn't keep up with my riding requirements when it came to freeway riding in the both the Los Angeles and Orange County freeways. 80 mph is the flow of traffic and 50hp was not enough to give me the options that I needed when changing lanes. Sure, I don't need 117 max hp but it was easier to buy a bike with more than enough power that was already in a package that I desired than it was looking for a bike that has 88.5 max hp <---I think that might be enough to suit my needs--I don't know...I'm just trying to make a point by being ridiculous.
 

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Greetings eidian

eidian..... it was not my intention to imply that riding anything bigger than a 250 was somehow not a desirable thing. Truth is I love almost any kind of motorcycle from the mopeds to the screaming demons. My point was only that strictly from a practical consideration the Ninja 250 is a better value that serves it's intended purpose well as an inexpensive, low maintenance, practical transportation alternative. Freeways and Interstates everywhere these days run 80 MPH or so they are no different here and the only issue I have is it would be nice to have a bigger windshield on my Ninja 250 at those speeds. I'm sure the acceleration you have on your Z1000 is a rush and worth the price you pay for its vastly superior performance along with its higher maintenance cost and insurance. I do wonder however how you got along with whatever car you have that most likely doesn't have anywhere near the acceleration of your bike allowing you the options you need when changing lanes. My sister lives in Los Angeles and what I remember most from the freeways there was bumper to bumper roll a bit and stop. Not much fun on a charger like you have. Still when the road opens up YEAH fun city! I do realize my friend that bikes represent much more than practical transportation..their about fun and excitement. Just look around and see what's on the street. There are more than a few of us though who find sufficient performance and enjoyment in our practical little 250's to keep it the number one selling bike in the Kawasaki line.
 

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Berry: All excellent points. I think you're going to find that my driving requirements are not typical. I have a '95 Toyota Camry waiting for me to register it in my name so that I can drive it. The only reason why I have a car at all is because I may need to take our 14 week old daughter somewhere or it might rain; but for now I will drive my wife's '07 RAV4 to take the family around. Let me tell you, people are much more apt to let a white SUV into their lane when the turn signal is on than when I'm on the Z1000. My solution to that?...go way ahead of the a-hole that won't let me in. I didn't have that option on the 500R--I always had to "force" my way in between vehicles because there was no power left to accelerate; and no amount of planning could avoid that. The acceleration on the Z1 was a requirement for freeway riding (the part of the 91 that I take doesn't jam up typically at the hours that I ride), being "rush" would be incidental for some other rider--for me it's all business...the rush comes in when I take the bike to Angeles Crest for the fun. For me, the freeway and the city streets aren't where I get my adrenaline fix. If I am stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic, the low and mid-rang torque on the Z1 allow for very easy lane splitting in traffic that's slower than 35 mph. Oh, and if it rains, I take the car on the surface streets so that I have to deal with the idiots who can't drive on the freeway in the rain when I go to work.

Other factors? My 500R got 50 mpg--my Z1 37; that's the compromise that I accepted for more power. Insurance? $218/yr for the 500r--$256/yr for the Z1.
 

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Hello ervins

ervins: I grew up in the days of the old British Twins like Triumph, BSA, Norton as well as the old Jap two strokes I dearly loved ( pre Motocross days they were Scrambles then..first a Hodaka Ace 90 and the last one was a Suzuki RM400) and ring dinging street bikes. I had many great times ridding such bikes and thought then those bikes hauled ***. In truth things change and even my little 250 would outperform most of them. As you said all bikes have their purposes. At 58 years of age I'm not any any real hurry and 100 miles an hour top speed or so is just fine with me as is accelerating faster than any car that is beside me thats ok as well. The frugal side of me appreciates the mileage averaging 67-68 MPG most the time running 55-60 with occasional runs down the Interstate at 80 MPH or so. My best mileage is 82 MPG running the back roads at a leisurely 45-50 MPH. I do my own maintenance and enjoy that too.. valve adjustments are lock nut and screw, carb synching is easy, tires are $110.00 a set, lube the chain every 500 miles or so etc you get the idea. I could afford another bike but this one suits me well. If I were to purchase another it would be the new Ninja 250. I'd love to get an old BSA 650 Lightning but just because I like the old bikes but never would trust it as a daily rider. I'd just like to have it to look at. Guess it's back to what you said again. It's all up to what you want in a bike. The logical progression you speak about regarding bikes depending on the individual doesn't necessarily get larger ervins. For me and I suspect many others smaller can be better.
 

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I am looking at a another bike...One with gas mileage...I am looking at a WR250 SuperMoto...Gas is great and speed on par with 250...There are options out there but yes, in the end, it is up to the rider...I will always need a big bike and can see to a limited sense a smaller bike for gas savings and fun.
 

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ervins smaller bike

I am looking at a another bike...One with gas mileage...I am looking at a WR250 SuperMoto...Gas is great and speed on par with 250...There are options out there but yes, in the end, it is up to the rider...I will always need a big bike and can see to a limited sense a smaller bike for gas savings and fun.

ervins: The WR250 from what I've read sounds like fun if your ride is short and primarily back roads. Holding around two gallons of go juice and a top speed of 70MPH or so makes it's uses somewhat limited at least for my needs anyway. A change of tires or buying the R would make it more fun off-road. At $6000.00 it sounds a bit pricey to for it's capabilities. So ervins...what ya gonna use your new smaller bike for?
 

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They come from the left

Berry: All excellent points. I think you're going to find that my driving requirements are not typical. I have a '95 Toyota Camry waiting for me to register it in my name so that I can drive it. The only reason why I have a car at all is because I may need to take our 14 week old daughter somewhere or it might rain; but for now I will drive my wife's '07 RAV4 to take the family around. Let me tell you, people are much more apt to let a white SUV into their lane when the turn signal is on than when I'm on the Z1000. My solution to that?...go way ahead of the a-hole that won't let me in. I didn't have that option on the 500R--I always had to "force" my way in between vehicles because there was no power left to accelerate; and no amount of planning could avoid that. The acceleration on the Z1 was a requirement for freeway riding (the part of the 91 that I take doesn't jam up typically at the hours that I ride), being "rush" would be incidental for some other rider--for me it's all business...the rush comes in when I take the bike to Angeles Crest for the fun. For me, the freeway and the city streets aren't where I get my adrenaline fix. If I am stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic, the low and mid-rang torque on the Z1 allow for very easy lane splitting in traffic that's slower than 35 mph. Oh, and if it rains, I take the car on the surface streets so that I have to deal with the idiots who can't drive on the freeway in the rain when I go to work.

Other factors? My 500R got 50 mpg--my Z1 37; that's the compromise that I accepted for more power. Insurance? $218/yr for the 500r--$256/yr for the Z1.

Hey daddy eidian...congrats on the little girl dude. I have two
granddaughters four and eight who have become the loves of my life. As an
old probably more cautious kinda fella I fear for your safety out there with
the crazies on the LA freeways but understand the desire to ride regardless.
The Z1000 is a beautiful machine capable of awesome performance and handling
and although you state it's all business and no rush even when you travel
the crowded freeway I'm not too sure just a little adrenaline rush doesn't
happen occasionally even if it's triggered by some jerk pulling out in front
of you when your accelerating ahead to find that hole to safely merge into.
The small difference in your insurance cost between the 500 and the Z1
surprises me ...the mileage does not. Sounds like you're happy with the Z1
and it suits you needs well. God be with you and yours eidian and
remember...they usually come from the left....watch out for the cagers.
 

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ninja 250 is for newbies

I just recently puchased an 08' ZZR 600 as my first bike. I've had it about 2 months and have 1280 miles already (and I live in Hawaii go figure). I basically got bored and wanted something else to do so I bough a bike. I got the same story from people I knew who had recently purchased a Ninja 250. I heard everything from "Its a real Ninja", and " The power is in the higher RPM".

The question I ask is if the Ninja 250 is such a great bike, hy spend so much time justifying it?

Yes I did ride one finally today. In comparison to the ZZR 600 I still feel the ZZR is a better bike. Sure the Ninja 250 is smaller and lighter and handles exceptionally well. However the ZZR doesn't NEED to wait until the higher RPM to pull. You roll on the throttle with a 600 and it moves. Granted the highest speed limit in Hawaii is 55 mph. AND? How many riders only ride the speed limit. I've been at 130 on my ZZR and got there faster than a Nissan 350z (So I had to prove something, and?) While riding the 250 I noticed myself wanting. Not to knock any owners, because I say if you bought it and love it than great for you. But the Ninja 250 is not for me, and isn't for everybody for that fact.
 
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