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Discussion Starter #1
First of all, many thanks to all who have generously shared their knowledge on here.

I'm preparing to remove the eye-sore that is my factory turn-signal/license plate fender. Fender Eliminator kits seem like a rip off to me for the price. I always end up making my own stuff anyway since I'm so picky, so I'm looking to put together my own license mount and rear turn signals. The trouble is, I won't settle for anything less than LED's. My tail light is a huge cluster of them, so I want the look to be consistent.

I've found several online stores that sell LED's in small packages of 8 or so. I think this is a good start, but my problem is that my knowledge of soldering the clusters together doesn't go so far as knowing how to connect the finished piece to the bike. A bike battery is 12V right? After I complete each LED cluster (a.k.a. my new turn signals) I'll need to get power to them of course. Does anyone have any experience with this? I'm thinking that a couple of simple pos and neg wires coming from the LED clusters should be sufficient to power them. This may sound obvious and dumb, but it never hurts to ask. I'm a new rider and am always trying to learn.

Thanks for any advice!
 

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You need to keep in mind that LED's use very little power to operate. Much less than your normal turn signals, therefore when you change to LED's your turn signals will blink a lot faster. You can solve this two ways, you can add a resistor to increase the power required for the LED's or you can change your turn signal relay for an electronic relay that flashes at the same rate regardless of the lamp load.

Check out this website, a lot of guys I know have used LED's from them; plus there's a lot of good LED info: http://www.superbrightleds.com/

I hope this helps!
 

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LED's installed

Hi:
I purchased my LED tail and stop lights from custom dynamics. The cluster assemblies came wired with a pigtail that was just like the base of a 1157 bulb. If you break the glass bulb off an 1157 (double contact) and just wire the two leads from your cluster to it, you can insert the base in the socket just as you would a bulb. As for the signals blinking faster, I have front turn signals that are still incondesent bulbs. The flashers do blink faster, but not so fast that you cant still use them. In fact, I think they draw more attention blinking faster that way. I tried the electronic flasher that they sell and for me, the unit got too hot and I didnt want something that hot under my seat. You see, it mimicks a load so it has to get hot in order to function. Its not necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
loving the feedback

Knightrider,

That's great info about the 1157 bulbs. The thing is, I'm starting from scratch. The original sockets that come mounted to my fender are enormous, a thing I'm trying to get away from. I will essentially be making my own led clusters that need to be connected as a hardwire job.

The other pages mentioned have been awesome. Thanks for all the help, and more is always welcome :)
 

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RIP Deron Harden :-(
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ZX6RRNEWBIE was on to something, but let me add a little to that. keep in mind that all and LED is, is a light emitting diode. diodes by definition only use 0.7 volts when fed the right way. that being said, you really should have a resistor in line with your LED's or at least one for the cluster. if you do not do this, you may end up burning them out pretty quick. once you decide how many and how you are going to utilize them, i would just ask a local shop like radio shack what size resistor you should use and where it should be located. they may even have a better idea on how to arrange the LED's in your circuit. you can buy clusters of LED on ebay. i actually bought a bag of 50 of them with resistors for around $12 or $15. they shipped from Japan so i was a little nervous, but everything turned out fine. now i just need to find places to put them.....

good luck.
 

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i've been doing small LED projects, and what i ended up doing was just buying 100 leds and resitors from http://besthongkong.com/ ... heres the ones i got... http://www.besthongkong.com/modules.php?name=catalog&file=product_info&cPath=18&products_id=50

they are 470ohm, theres a chart, but i get confused reading it... the |< sybol is a LED, basically it says that u need 1 resistor for each LED, which can be a task if your doing a 20 LED bulb. I have been able to do 2 or 3 LEDs off one of these 470ohm resitors, but that reuduces the brightness (MCD). I'd recomend about 4000-5000 MCD for you project, which will be pretty **** bright, after 10 LEDs. (i could shine a faint 10ft circle on a house 40 ft away with a 13000MCD LED) Anyways, id say find a good resistor that will let you wire up 4-5 LEDs to one. I dont really recommend Radio shack, because i dont think they even have 100MCD leds, and their resistors are like $3 for 5. I got 100 LEDs with resistors for $25 shipped. That should give you enough for a set of under bodies, and 4 turns. Im sure you could always sell your left overs to the next person tackling the same project. Good luck, jp
 

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RIP Deron Harden :-(
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ok, just a quick electronics lesson. an LED is a Light Emitting Diode as i am sure most of you know. the thing about a diode is that it has a specific voltage drop across it, which is the reason for the resistor. the LED only needs 0.7 volts i believe, but i could be wrong, been out of school for a while. what you do is size the resistor to get the correct current to flow through the LED. current is the same in series, and you already know that the LED flow 0.7, if i am right, so the resistor gets 11.3volts. using ohms law the resistance is equal to the voltage divided by the current. if you know the current of the resistor, then you can put it into the formula and figure out what size resistor to use. that being said, you probably could use multiple LED's on one resistor as long as you calculate everything properly. wow, i am exhausted....
 
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