Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A few tips from advanced riding courses over the years. They may seem obvious to experienced riders, but I must say that they weren't to me at the time I learned them.

Slow turns. Don't look down at the ground. If, for instance, you are doing a u-turn in a road, look at where you want to end up, not where you are tracking.

In a bend. More or less the same. Look up and across towards the exit of the bend, don't concentrate on the immediate edge in front of you.

Also. If you start to go wide in a bend. And this one is hard to get your mind into. Turn your bars slightly out from the bend. Don't turn in. Sounds crazy? Try it. The bike drops and turns in more. Believe me.

When you stop, try to stop with one foot on the back brake, and only put the other foot on the ground. In first gear, if you can manage that.

Practice, and it will happen.


o
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
What is the license procedure on your side of the pond for motorcycles?

The suggestions you made are very sound and are part of our rider education course for riders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
All basic stuff, though you're right, if someone doesn't go to a MSF class they might not know where to get this info.

Look where you want to go, not where you don't want to go, because you'll go where you're looking, including straight into the ground or a tree.

Left foot always comes down first. Leave the right foot on the brake if possible.

Um... is there any other way to turn? We were taught that's how you turn. You push left to turn left, push right to turn right, anything over creeping speed. If you're already deep into a turn you shouldn't have been able to get there without knowing this already.

Maybe sport bikes are different, because I wouldn't be able to drive the thing down the highway without mastering the push and the lean. Do cruisers not require as much push?

All good advice, though. But the best advice is to make sure you take a Motorcycle Safety class, i.e. begining driver's class. Otherwise there's all sorts of basic stuff you might never learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
"Maybe sport bikes are different, because I wouldn't be able to drive the thing down the highway without mastering the push and the lean. Do cruisers not require as much push?"

I guess what you refer to is counter steering and yes, cruisers do require the use of this..possibly even more due to the weightand slower handling. We should practice this often so that in an evasive manuever it becomes 2nd nature to do so. Many accidents occur when the rider tends to fixate on the obstruction & riding straight into it rather than his escape route and counter steering around it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Here's one:
When riding on a curve, lets say a left curve on an entrance to a highway and your sight is limited due to trees and the curve in the road itself, move to the outer part of the roadway to the right. this will give you a broader view of the curve and whats in front of you. Ultimately do the opposite for a right curve. Try it, it gives you a greater view than hugging the inside of the turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
All good stuff and taught repiticiously (?) on the "Ride Like A Pro", DVD.Another exercise to practice is slow parking lot riding by the use of the friction zone rear brake, & throttle. RPMs should be just a tad above idling speed, about 1000 rpms, clutch in the friction zone, i.e. just at the point where it starts to engage, and foot on the brake. By using the brake in concert with the clutch & throttle, the bike tends to stand up straight at slow speeds in turns as well as going straight. This skill is also used when making a sharp turn from a stop, such as when entering an intersection.
Any one who isn't aware of these and other skills when riding touring bikes or cruisers should pick up Jerry Paladino's tape or dvd one his ridelikeapro website.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top