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Former Vulcan Lady
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Discussion Starter #1
"Once every generation, we get a chance for a new Motorcycle Crash Causation Study. The last one, by Harry Hurt, was published in 1981. It made recommendations that led to always-on headlights and improvements in rider training. These were major factors in the one-third reduction in motorcycle fatalities between the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.

In October 2009, US DOT announced a new Crash Causation Study authorized by the SAFETEA-LU bill. The scope of the study has since been trimmed to only 300 crashes, far fewer than the 900 to 1200 originally required, which is what all experts agree is needed for good statistics. There are full details about this issue at BikeSafer.com Crash Study Petition Fact Page, including the official statements, stakeholders and background information.

Bikers need this new study because 5290 bikers die yearly in crashes, we don't fully understand why, and we need good crash causation information to ride safely and inform public policy. The new study has the potential to find the current causes of crashes, and identify successful riding strategies that might work for us all.

We believe that the stakeholders need to figure out a way to use our tax dollars wisely and ensure the study samples 900 to 1200 crashes, as originally required."

Please sign the petition at Bike Safer.com: Motorcycle Crash Study Petition Crash Study Petition. Bikers have a stake in this outcome, and we need to have a voice in the issue. If you could forward this to your mailing list, it would help get the word out. "This is a non-group affiliated campaign and all rider groups and individuals are invited to participate. "
 

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Though, many bike accidents are caused by "unnoticeable" riders, which leads to the common solution being recognition. The question remains as to what we can do to make us more noticeable.

Though IMO, the majority of accidents are rider faults and all the noticeable gear, markings, lights, etc., will do nothing to eliminate that. Therefore, I believe we need to strongly reinforce the importance of rider education and responsibility. The MSF is a great start but enhancement training should be considered. Combine this with recognition and I believe we will see a drop in accidents and fatalities.
 

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Novice Tank Roller
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15,810 Posts
Though, many bike accidents are caused by "unnoticeable" riders, which leads to the common solution being recognition. The question remains as to what we can do to make us more noticeable.

Though IMO, the majority of accidents are rider faults and all the noticeable gear, markings, lights, etc., will do nothing to eliminate that. Therefore, I believe we need to strongly reinforce the importance of rider education and responsibility. The MSF is a great start but enhancement training should be considered. Combine this with recognition and I believe we will see a drop in accidents and fatalities.
LOUD PIPES!!!!!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

I agree with you. I'd hazzard a guess that most accidents are the rider's fault. Education would go a long way to help the situation.
 

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Politicians' Nightmare
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1,871 Posts
Petition submitted. Looking at the stats, about 1/6 of U.S. fatal vehicle crashes last year killed bikers, but since bikers don't account for anywhere near that proportion of the total vehicles on the road that figure is alarming. It's even more so if an increasing proportion of fatal crashes is due to biker errors, which we ourselves can work to prevent.
 

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nu2kawi
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2,707 Posts
Most drivers will say they didn't see the bike rider. They came outa nowhere. Loud pipes, lit up like a christmas tree will not make a difference, it's up to the rider to be as safe as they can be. If you get hit they will still say they didn't see you. Signed it.
 

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Most drivers will say they didn't see the bike rider. They came outa nowhere. Loud pipes, lit up like a christmas tree will not make a difference, it's up to the rider to be as safe as they can be. If you get hit they will still say they didn't see you. Signed it.
In most cases, I believe drivers do not see the bike, but I'm also willing to bet many drivers use that excuse because it works.
 

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Most observers here seem to be under the impression that another vehicle was involved or another driver was at fault. I'd like to see some numbers on single-vehicle fatalities (bike hits something or goes off the road) and some stats on crotch rockets v. cruisers.
 

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Novice Tank Roller
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15,810 Posts
Most observers here seem to be under the impression that another vehicle was involved or another driver was at fault. I'd like to see some numbers on single-vehicle fatalities (bike hits something or goes off the road) and some stats on crotch rockets v. cruisers.
That would be interesting to see. The crotch rockets are killing squids who can't control the power. The cruisers are killing the posers that need the HD look for their first bike.

Am I generalizing enough???!! :mrgreen:

Of course, then there are guys like me who make a stupid mental mistake or misjudgement and go down. However, my wrecks have never been serious nor reported. So I guess the statistics they come up with would be tainted because of the non-reported ones. It would be getting the entire picture that would tell the real story.
 

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frequently disturbs class
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Most observers here seem to be under the impression that another vehicle was involved or another driver was at fault. I'd like to see some numbers on single-vehicle fatalities (bike hits something or goes off the road) and some stats on crotch rockets v. cruisers.
not to jack the thread, but these stats and many more are the subject of Chapter 1 in Proficient Motorcycling - an excellent book by David L. Hough. If anyone is looking for a great read on ways to avoid becoming one of those troubling stats, look no further.
 

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Novice Tank Roller
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15,810 Posts
not to jack the thread, but these stats and many more are the subject of Chapter 1 in Proficient Motorcycling - an excellent book by David L. Hough. If anyone is looking for a great read on ways to avoid becoming one of those troubling stats, look no further.
Rule number 1: Don't follow me! :mrgreen:
 

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I'd like to see some numbers on single-vehicle fatalities (bike hits something or goes off the road) and some stats on crotch rockets v. cruisers.
I'd have to find the numbers but sport bikes are the leading bike in fatalities amongst service members. Too many young kids come back from combat with all that cash in their pockets and go and get Busa's, ZX14's, R1's etc, and just can't deal with that much power. Plus the fact that Soldiers are looking for that adrenaline rush again. Several steps are being taken to limit these accidents. A number of bases are making mandatory sport bike courses, and some bases are even making it so Soldiers cannot ride their bike after a deployment until they get refresher training. I have mixed feelings on that one but something does need to be done about the increase in bike fatalities.
 

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I just got some numbers. They're just regarding the Army though.

...............FY 05......FY06......FY07......FY08......FY09
Crashes:....139.........184........154........217........118
Fatalities.....40...........49.........38..........50.........29

Seems to be that some of the programs are working. Numbers were cut in HALF from last year to now!!!
 

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Novice Tank Roller
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15,810 Posts
The sport bike fatalaties probably have to do with the demographics of service personnel. If they were a bunch of old geezers like me, they'd be crashing cruisers. (myself excluded) :biggrin:
 
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