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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, it's been over a year now since I took the MSF class, so I'm in a fog here...I seem to remember them teaching that it was always better to lay a bike down in an emergency situation....am I remembering that correctly? For instance, if you're appraoching something stationery, like a suddenly stopped truck, isn't it better to lay the bike down then hit it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks!
I swear I thought they talked about how to lay a bike down when you're in an emergency situation where you will rear end or t-bone something.....
 

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Poser Proud®
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Okay, it's been over a year now since I took the MSF class, so I'm in a fog here...I seem to remember them teaching that it was always better to lay a bike down in an emergency situation....am I remembering that correctly? For instance, if you're appraoching something stationery, like a suddenly stopped truck, isn't it better to lay the bike down then hit it?
I can't tell you what the MSF says, I never took it, but I can tell you what they teach in the police certification course. If you lay the bike down, you have no more control over anything, you are just sliding. There are several videos that show how to do a maximum performance 90 degree turn or an avoidance maneuver (almost the same thing) to hit the object at an angle thus reducing damage. The only time I could see laying a bike down on purpose was if your passage was completely blocked (no way around either end) and there was an area under the blocking object so you could "slide under" That would be very rare, except in the movies. Emergency braking is the 1st choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can't tell you what the MSF says, I never took it, but I can tell you what they teach in the police certification course. If you lay the bike down, you have no more control over anything, you are just sliding. There are several videos that show how to do a maximum performance 90 degree turn or an avoidance maneuver (almost the same thing) to hit the object at an angle thus reducing damage. The only time I could see laying a bike down on purpose was if your passage was completely blocked (no way around either end) and there was an area under the blocking object so you could "slide under"
That makes sense!!!! Thank you!!!
It seems obvious, but I didn't even think about the "no longer having control of your bike" factor!!!
 

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MaNaMaNa DoDoDoDoDo
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My instructor said the only time to lay it down is if you are definitely gonna hit a retaining wall and you will be ejected over a cliff.
 

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^ Yep, that's the only time it's sensible to lay it down.

Otherwise it's better to remain upright and risk collision, than to lay it down and ensure one.
 

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Cheri dear, the new technological advancements in rubber compounds that tire manufacturers use allow for greater lateral traction and stopping ability than the seat of your pants. ;)
 

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Brakes sure helped me keep from hitting a ditch today. Right turn, acute angle, around a corner onto another street, up a slope, a bit much speed due to slight misjudgement. Little ditch to the left of the road growing large, brakes (probably more front than back, now that I think about it), some force kicks me and bike upright and around to line up with the road and journey on, breathing a little harder, thanking and thanking God, angels, spirit guides, Zen. Gracie did give me some protests after that, some hiccups in power. Fuel was getting a touch low. Maybe sudden sloshing made her suck fumes. As a reward to my green-blooded little mount for staying upright, we trundled up to a gas station for some fresh juice, rather than returning to the garage for the stale stuff in the plastic can.
Think, if I'd panicked and bailed, I'd be limping home with tail between my legs and a scraped up motorcycle. I did what you mentioned, braked hard, and let the back end skid around by giving more front brake than back. It was like Zen, really, no thought, just whatever it took to put the bike back right. Next time, I'll slow down more before I start the turn.
 
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