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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Well, I've obtained the correct bolt and made a spacer so I've got a makeshift version of the proper pulley removal tool...

Original removal tool:


My bolt (spacer not shown, but is smaller cut down bolt rod):


And it fits fine, with the spacer happily inserting into the crankshaft. Trouble is that even using a compressed air impact wrench, it tightened the bolt till it stops moving and yet the pulley won't come off.

I tried this without doing anything to hold the crankshaft still since the impact wrench doesn't spin the pulley, just knocks it slightly round bit by bit. Maybe holding the crankshaft still then using the impact wrench will make a difference, increasing the force on the bolt?

That leads me to methods of keeping the crankshaft from turning... I need to find a way not only to try with the impact wrench, but also in case it still doesn't do it and I have to resort to another method I've read about on the net involving using a long wrench with a pipe over the handle to increase the length to about 4 - 5 foot to give lots of leverage.

One method I read about which the person claimed worked great for him involved removing a spark plug, lowering the piston to the bottom of the cylinder and then inserting thin rope into the cylinder through the spark plug hole until you can't get any more in. Then turn the crankshaft pushing the piston upwards until it squashes the rope up and can't move any further.

This method worries me because all the force on the long wrench is then transferred to the crankshaft, the piston rod, the piston head and the cylinder head. Is all that force against the cylinder head good? What about breaking it or warping it?

Other than that, I'm stumped. Using a chain wrench seems doomed to failure since there's give to an extent until you've got it nice and taught by turning your long wrench, and what do you use to hold the chain wrench in place against all the force applied to the long bar wrench?

I'm stuck yet again, even finally having the right bolt! Please help.

Thanks,
James
 

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did you try a longer spacer than what you are using ?
the other thing you might try is to put tension on it and smack the assembly with a dead blow hammer or hit the bolt directly with decent size hammer. with and impact you shouldn't have to hold the crankshaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for those ideas, I'll give them a try tomorrow. By the way, what are your thoughts on the rope trick, jamming the piston in place to stop the crankshaft moving? Would you be worried with all that force going on the cylinder head?
 

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I personally would not put rope in the cylinder, but I am thinking if done right it would not damage anything . you would have to have the piston on the bottom of its compression stroke and feed enough rope in the cylinder so that crank doesn't turn so the valves don't open. Honestly though an impact should do the trick and on website that I go to one of the guys says he wedges a broom stick in the drive and uses a breacker bar to tighten the bolt after.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well today's been interesting but not good. I put rope in the cylinder to stop any movement since the impact wrench was causing the pulley to turn a bit with each strike so some energy must have been lost. It worked in so far as it tightened the bolt more, but all this did was bend the bolt shaft I was using as a spacer and even slightly bent the hardened steel bolt I was using as pictured in my original post, as well as causing the end of it to mushroom slightly so removing it took ages even with the impact wrench.

I hate interference fits, stupid idea. Enough force to bend and damage the bolt but not pull the pulley off!

Now I have a bigger problem - the bolt shaft I used as a spacer is so distorted now that I can't remove it from inside the pulley. I've inserted a magnet on a shaft which grabs the spacer but it hits the internal pulley threads and won't get past them.

So, after today's debacle, although I'd decided the best option was just to find a supplier in the UK (if there's one) and buy the proper removal tool after the damage to the large bolt, I can't even do that since the spacer is stuck inside the pulley/crankshaft. Okay, the spacer must have been mild steel which was a bad idea, but even the hardened steel (grade 10.9) bolt got damaged without the pulley coming off, so hopefully the proper tool would have been the answer if I could remove the spacer. What a nightmare.

No idea what to do next.
 

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Yeah I have never seen it done without the right tool so I wasn't sure if the was the prob.
How about making and adapter and using a slide hammer basically you could use your hardened bolt weld a nut fitting a slide hammer to it and with a decent size slide hammer it may work.
Sorry thats all I got other than that its looking like you have to get that spacer out of there and I don't see how thats going to happen without destroying stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Haven't got any further yet. I haven't a slide hammer but I'm still trying to think of ways to sort out the problem of the stuck spacer. I've got a couple of ideas but not confident in them. When I've had chance to test them out, I'll get back and post the results.
 

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James, At this point I would fill the hole with some type of penetrent like pb blaster and let it sit for a day. Then you're going to have to rig up a slide hammer like honinsane said. The only other thing I would do is try heating the sheave before using the slide hammer. you will have to be careful as the sheave is aluminum I believe. If none of this works you will have to cut away part of sheave with sawzall being carefull not to hit the crank. Then you should be able to get standard gear puller on there and pull the remains off.
Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, some very good news: got the pulley off today, intact and undamaged. Since the spacer was stuck and now too small from being squashed, I decided there was nothing to lose by inserting another stronger (8.8 grade steel), cut-off bolt shaft into the hole, filing off the slightly flared end of the large bolt that I was screwing into the pulley inner, and then tightening it up again. My reasoning was that if the spacers just got squashed up, I'd add another and another until they couldn't be squashed anymore and maybe I'd get the force needed on the crankshaft to pop the pulley off. Wasn't sure if my large bolt would just flare out at the end a bit again but not too bothered at this point.

Well, the main difference this time was that I didn't use the impact wrench, I used a 2-foot long torque wrench I had lying around instead (impact wrench not available to me today). Did the bolt up till it got fairly tight, returned wrench to start position again and pulled it over, not having to use much force really. All of a sudden it went loose and I saw the pulley wobble as I removed the wrench so just grabbed it and pulled it off.

Not much more distortion at all to the original stuck spacer, nor the new 8.8 grade one, and the large bolt hadn't suffered at all - no flaring whatsoever. Seems the impact wrench slowly introduced more torque to the bolt with its constant hammering, but that just slowly squashed the spacers and damaged the bolt. But the long wrench was giving the bolt a good 1/4 turn each time and perhaps put the torque onto the bolt more quickly and popped the pulley off before the metal spacers and bolt could start to suffer and squash and flare.

All I can say is that a long wrench seemed to do a better and quicker job than the impact wrench, especially since the impact wrench was taking a relatively long time to slowly bang the bolt around 1/32 of a turn with each strike as it got tighter and tighter, yet needed quite a small force on the large wrench in one easy go to actually tighten to the point of pulling the pulley off.

Hope this info might help someone else attempting this job. Incidentally, if planning on using a normal bolt with a spacer instead of proper tool, you'll need a metric bolt: M14 x 1.5mm (1.5mm refers to thread pitch) and minimum 100mm long. In hindsight, I'd just buy the proper tool and make a tough job easier.
 
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