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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much rolling resistance should the mule have in 2wd?

I ask as there is quite a fair amount. Let off the gas and it slows down quickly. Even in Neutral.

Jacking up the front end and turning the tires by hand shows stout resistance. They don't coast or freewheel at all. Is that normal or is there an issue somewhere?

Thanks,
jb
 

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What you have is friction from the belt drag on the torque converter clutches when rolling, so they will have a significant amount of friction anytime the drive belt is installed.

For the front differential only it is always a good idea to remove the center driveline and then jack up the front end so both tires are off the ground and then do your rolling resistance test. The oil seals and CV bellows offer quite a bit of resistance, so do not expect it to just roll away once you start it spinning.

If you suspect a bearing failure somewhere in the drive train, it is a good idea to remove the drive belt and then put the machine up on jackstands with all four wheels free to turn. Then turn the wheels by hand and see about resistance one wheel at a time. You will hear noise from any joint or bearing that is starting to fail, so listen carefully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't hear any snapping, crackling or popping. No u-joint or CV sounds. It's just a smooth steady resistance.

Now that I'm thinking about it, I would say it's in 4wd that same way too.


FRom what you say, that is normal. Right?

thanks!
jb
 

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I know a Kawasaki Prarie is built to do this .... I know nothing of mules ....but on the prairie people have found ways to eliminate or reduce this by replacing the drive pulley springs
 

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That is normal for a Mule. As Honestlyinsane states you can modify the driven torque converter pulley with a different helix, springs, and ramp followers and eliminate the drag. Unless you are familiar with the tuning and operation of drive belt based torque converters or have a good resource in your immediate area, I would not fool with it. They are sensitive to engine rpm, load, altitude, tuning state, etc. A wrong step can create more trouble and eaten belts than it would be worth.

The best source of torque converter tuning is an established snowmobile performance center. They have the needed years of experience and the manufacturers' charts that list the various torque curves and which springs, ramps, followers, etc. to use for best performance.
 

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How do I start a thread? I want to know what noises and jerks a Kawasaki Mule is supposed to have when in 4 wheel drive. This has got to be the poorest 4X4 system on the planet! Am I right when saying it's just a cog or a pin that goes in and out with a loud and heavy clank when putting it in or out of gear? (or when driving on wet or dry surfaces?????)
Surf
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
How do I start a thread? I want to know what noises and jerks a Kawasaki Mule is supposed to have when in 4 wheel drive. This has got to be the poorest 4X4 system on the planet! Am I right when saying it's just a cog or a pin that goes in and out with a loud and heavy clank when putting it in or out of gear? (or when driving on wet or dry surfaces?????)
Surf
Little button on the top left of the page, not when reading a thread. It says "New Thread" or some other:wink: secret code

The 4x4 system has never let me down, but you do know that you have to be stopped to engage it, right? When ever I have engaged the lever over the past 6 years, it has worked soundlessly.

jb
 

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When you first bring up the topic page, start your thread there.

All four part time wheel drive systems, even those in heavy duty units such as a Dodge diesel, rely on direct engagement of a sliding gear or lock assembly to engage the front driveline.

The most frequent cause of rough shifting is a badly adjusted throttle or a primary clutch on the belt drive that is improperly set up. The second most frequent cause of rough shifting is driver abuse such as jambing them in or out of gear while spinning - just once will ruin them!

As far as being the poorest system, no. The worst is what GM uses in their new pickups and SUV's. The Kaw system is actually quite good and will last many years with decent care and proper set up. Unfortunately, not all that many dealers really know how to set one up for drivers that fail to take them back after break-in when the engine speeds up and starts causing belt drag in the torque converter, and not many owners bother to have them readjusted after engine break-in and then set about tearing things up without thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
RCW, is that adjustment procedure in the KAW manual? If not, can you give an overview (or is it buried somewhere here, just waiting for a proper search word?).

jb
 

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The idle speed is found in the specifications section of the Owner's Manual. The clutch set-up is in the repair manual. Set the idle to the specified level first, then deal with the clutch adjustment process if the problem remains.

The biggest problem with idle speed is that most owners do not have tachometers, and they are critical on a belt driven torque converter system to know your starting points for trouble shooting.
 
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