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Extreme Gizmologist
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On my last day of my 7-day Australian ride, I rode from Port Macquarie south down Rt 1 to Sydney where tomorrow I'll catch a flight home to Maryland. After riding through the mountains, riding yesterday and today down Rt 1 was a bit of a letdown. 800 km of mostly 100 and 110 kph highway, some two-lanes, some 4-lane divided highway. Thankfully, many of the larger towns and cities have a "tourist" route which leaves the highway, goes through some local towns, provides connection to highways going other places, and then rejoins Rt 1. I took a couple of these tourist routes to get off of Rt 1 for a while so I could see some interesting countryside and maybe ride some more twisty roads.

The second such tourist route I took today was into a small town called Nabiac. After leaving the highway, I passed a small crossroads with a cafe, gas station, and a couple of other businesses. Continuing around a corner, I spotted this small sign:


OK, interesting enough. I remember one episode on American Chopper where the Teutel's visited a small motorcycle museum in Great Britain that had a few dozen bikes. I figured it was worth a visit. A short distance down the road, I came upon the entrance sign.


I came upon the museum parking lot and entrance with a large, 6-foot high bike outside.




This museum houses more than 700 bikes and consists of a main hall and two other halls that branch off to the left and right. Atter passing thru the gift shop area, I was blown away to see this view looking left into the main hall.


Walking around to the left was a doorway into the left wing hall. Here's views looking to either side of this hall.




Going back to the rear of the left hall, here's views towards the entrance to this hall.




Back in the main hall, here's a view across the main hall towards the right hall
 

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Extreme Gizmologist
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Discussion Starter #2
The right hall has some older motocross bikes on display.




Further back in the right wing is the museum stock of bikes waiting reconstruction and restoration. They're literally stacked together like firewood.


Stuff's hanging from the ceiling, inventory of old tires is at the back.






Next up, some views of vintage Kawasaki's...
 

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Oh WOW! That's so cool! Thank you, Mike. The best things in life are on backroads. I liked the tags on each of the bikes. Hopefully they had info about each bike on them.
 

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www.learntoride.org
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What a fortunate turn off the main road! It must be almost a spiritual experience walking through those doors.
 

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The National Motorcycle Museum, used to be housed in a shed in Canberra, Australia's Capital, when the owners "retired" up the coast to Nabiac, they moved the lot, lock, stock and bloody barrel, with them. Many of the bikes are donations, or on loan, I spent 2 days there in February this year, and didn't manage to see everything, I think my Favourite was the Vincent Black Shadow, about 100k of vintage bike!
Good find Mike glad you liked it.
Chris.
 

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Extreme Gizmologist
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Discussion Starter #8
Most of the motorcycles have a single-page fact sheet hanging from the handlebars. I'll repeat the information before each photo if I remembered to get it. With 700+ motorcycles on display and not having 2 days to spend looking around, I was only able to photograph a few motorcycles.

Right by the main entrance are two Kawasaki bikes:
Number:206 Model: Z1A Year: 1974 Owner: Kim Holman
A four stroke motorcycle, the original Z1A was tops in looks and performance producing spine-tingling excitement. A naked bike with wide handlebars, it was a dream to ride and handle. The smoothness of the motor and easy speed and loud howling engine noise made this an absolute king of the road.


Model: Z1300 Year: 1979 On Loan By: Allan Beard
6 Cylinder, water-cooled 12 valve DOHC, transverse six. Shaft drive, 1286cc capacity, 62 mm bore x 71mm stroke, 120 BHP @ 6000 rpm. Wet weight 670 lbs. Top speed: 135 mph. The Z1300 handled reasonably well for its size thought the performance was less startling than the specifications suggest. The exposed upright riding position limited its high speed cruising ability and the six cylinder motor had a rather busy feel.


This stylish Honda is also right by the main entrance.



This Honda has a finely-crafted sidecar. Sure looks like a coffin!


Number: 214 Model: GT750F Year: 1982 Owner: D & M Robinson
The GT750 Kawasaki was built as a naked motorcycle. A shaft drive four stroke, it was fast and became a popular dispatch motorcycle, but proved to be unpopular because it was heavy, cumbersome, and definitely not a sports motorcycle. It was extremeely low maintenance, but lacked the sports look of the 80's.


Model: Z900 Year: 1976 Owner: Kelleher Family
Produced for only one year as a followon from the Z1 series, basically the same motor as the Z1 with a bore and stroke of 66x66mm and a compression ration of 8.5:1, it developed 81 bhp at 8500 rpm. Main difference were twin front disks, locking fuel tank cap, and stronger frame which upped the weight by 8 lbs to 514 lbs.


On the left.
Model H1/500 Year: 1974 Owner: Kim Holman
The H1 was a 3 cylinder 2 stroke with the barrels in-line across the machine and fed by 3 carburetors mounted behind them so piston-controlled induction replaced the discs of the twins. The exhaust system was unique with 1 on the left side and 2 on the right similar to the Agusta Agostini race bikes of the same period. The frame was tubular with telescopic front forks, rear suspension, and drum brakes, and it was this and the engine power that made the excitement the model could generate.


Model: S1B Year: 1974 Owner: Kelleher Family
Released as the S1 in 1971, in 1976 it became the KH250-A and KH250-B and was finally dropped in 1980. The motor had a bore and stroke of 45x52mm, a capacity of 249.5cc, compression ration of 7.3:1, and produced 32 bhp at 8000 rpm (in 1973, 28 bhp at 7500 rpm). Its dry weight of 330 lbs was driven through five speed gear box. By 1978 dry weight had increased to 353 lbs.


Model: H2B Year: 1974 Owner: Kelleher Family
The largest of the company's triples at 750cc, the motor had a bore and stroke of 71x63mm, compression ratio of 7:1, and developed 75 bhp (71 bhp in 1973) at 6800 rpm. With an original dry weight of 423 lbs, by 1975 it was 458 lbs. Power was delivered through a five speed gear box and the package could reach a top speed of 126 mph and standing quarters in 12 seconds.


Model: W1 Year: 1966-1971 Owner: Kelleher Family
Introduced in 1966, Kawasaki had inherited Meguro's BSA based parallel twin, they thought it offered a quick route into the big bike market. The Kawasaki engine was 624cc and developed 50 bhp at 6500 rpm. It looked and rode like a pre-unit BSA. Other versions were the W1SS and street scrambler-style W2TT Commander.
 

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Extreme Gizmologist
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Discussion Starter #9
Model: B1L Year: 1965-1976 Owner: Kelleher Family
Produced from 1965 to 1976, the engine was 124.7cc with a compression ratio of 6.4:1, a disk inlet valve, and was rated at 12 bhp at 6500 rpm. This variant of the B1 was introduced before the basic model was released. This bike has an electric start and Autolube oil system.


Rear view of many of the vintage Kawasaki bikes.


Model: Yamaha YDS3 Year: 1964-1967 Owner: Allan Shires
Handling was improved over the previous model. Testers were enthusiatic over the searing acceleration. With a bore and stroke of 56x50mm, the motor had a capacity of 246cc. Compression ration at 7.5:1 gave 28 bhp at 8000 rpm. Lubrication was by Autolube and the machine weighed 350 lbs.




Model: Yamaha YDS3 Year: 1964-1967 Owner: Allan Shires
This model will probably be remembered for its use of Autolube lubrication of the engine. Produced from June 1964 to January 1967, the motor had a bore and stroke of 56x50mm giving a capacity of 246cc. With a compression ration of 7.5:1, it developed 28 bhp at 8000 rpm.




 

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Extreme Gizmologist
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Discussion Starter #10
Model: Indian 640 Year: 1939 Owner: Kelleher Family
A detuned Junior Scout motor of 500cc (30x50mm bore and stroke), low compression ratio, mild valve timing, restricted breathing made for easy starting and longevity. However, high performance was not required for military duties. This particular model was only produced from 1939 to 1941.


Model: Indian Scout Year: 1928 Owner: Kelleher Family
This Indian Scout was one of the famous range of motorcycles made in the USA between 1901 and the early 1950's. This is a 600cc machine, a V twin sidevalve. Note that it does not have any rear suspension. This is one of the 101 series. The 101 refers to the guaranteed minimum speed of 101 miles per hour and was used for quite a number of years and for different models.


No sign on this Indian.


Model: Indian Scout Year: 1926 Owner: Kelleher Family
The Indian Scout, first built in 1919 having a 596cc side valve engine was only one of the vast model ranges built by this manufacturer which for many years was America's largest producer of motorcycles. With power plants ranging from the 250cc two-strokes to 1234cc V-Twin four-strokes and also a 1265cc air-cooled inline four cylinder known as the Indian four which was previously an Ace motorcycle. Indian failed to improve and develop their machines and were overtaken by Harley Davidson as the largest producer of motorcycles in America. The machine on display is not original, but still has the aura which helped Indian dominate a market for so long.


Model: Indian ?? Year: circa 1912 Owner: Kelleher Family
We are not sure of the exact year model of this machine. Rear sprung frames for Indians came out in 1913. However the engine number prefix is 50H which dates the engine at possibly around 1915.
 

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MaNaMaNa DoDoDoDoDo
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Very cool, Mike. Those are some fantastic pics. Makes me miss my H1 500. Looking forward to seeing more pics of your trip.
 

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Last 007 MOM
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Very cool ... thanks for sharing!
 

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www.learntoride.org
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You really put a lot of work into your posts. Thank you so much! Hope your flight home goes well.
 

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the "fun" guy
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My...My...My...My...My...My...My...My...My...My...My...My...THAT IS AWESOME!!!!! :)

Talk about going back in time and doing it in abundance!!!

Thanks for posting the great pics/info. I enjoyed every minute of it!
 

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that is bloody awesome! didn't know it existed and i live about 5 hours ride away from it..... looks like we will have to do a run to the museum with the Australian Kawasaki Riders Forum.
Good pics!! love the old Kwaka's!!
 

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MAN, thanks so much for all the work you put in posting all this great stuff for us. great pic's great info. Just cool as hell.
 
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