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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my wife a 250 ninja this past spring, and noticed this past week that the idle is getting kinda funky. Seems like the most common reason would be that the carbs are are a little out of sync. I'm hoping to sell it this coming spring, so i don't really want to buy a shop manual for it if I don't have to, can anyone here tell me anything helpful about syncing a 2 carb bike, i.e. how many inches mercury I should read on my sync gages.

thanks

Tom
 

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Hey Tom (and congratulations for scoring a riding wife!)
The inches of mercury isn't as crucial as making sure that the mercury levels of both cylinders is equal. You can get a carb-synch tool that comes with directions, but having the service manual too is helpful.
I like to check the merc levels at idle, then at 3,000 or 4,000 rpm. Just be sure to twist the throttle gently and gradually so you don't suck that poisonous mercury into your chambers and fill your garage with mercury fumes from your exhaust.
Hopefully the same adjuster screw settings balance the merc levels at both idle and at 4,000-rpm, but if not, I prefer to favor the higher rpm. After all, your engine is going to spend more of its running time at higher rpm than at idle, right?
Good luck and let us know how it goes.
-CCinC
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Calamarichris said:
Hey Tom (and congratulations for scoring a riding wife!)
The inches of mercury isn't as crucial as making sure that the mercury levels of both cylinders is equal. You can get a carb-sync tool that comes with directions, but having the service manual too is helpful.
I like to check the merc levels at idle, then at 3,000 or 4,000 rpm. Just be sure to twist the throttle gently and gradually so you don't suck that poisonous mercury into your chambers and fill your garage with mercury fumes from your exhaust.
Hopefully the same adjuster screw settings balance the merc levels at both idle and at 4,000-rpm, but if not, I prefer to favor the higher rpm. After all, your engine is going to spend more of its running time at higher rpm than at idle, right?
Good luck and let us know how it goes.
-CCinC
Excellent :grin: I have already made the mistake of sucking up the mercury several years ago, ( you shouldn't drink beer while doing the procedure :wink: )
Thanks for the advice on the higher R.P.M. adjustment!
 
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