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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a new pair of boots and I can't seem to get my toes under the shifter or the brake pedal. The Shifter looks easy enough to adjust, I tried but did not have time today to get it done, I couldn't get the shifter all the way off. Looks like I need to get the foot peg bracket off first. Now how about the rear brake pedal, is there anyway to raise that up a little bit?
 

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I had problems with the dirt bike shifter (Suzuki 200) with the Thor boots. I had a Spirit 1100 & now the Meanie and had no problems with the shifter clearance after buying some well-padded work boots. The rear brake? I am confused as to how any boots would impact that pedal adversely. That is, unless you have to lift your foot too high(?).
You may want to take the boots back & if possible, bring the bike along. Otherwise, try the new boot in the store to see if you would have the shifter clearance issues.
Regards & good luck
 

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One of the reasons they make things adjustable is so you can adjust them guys! Just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As far as the rear brake goes, when I am riding long distances I don't always cover it and would like to get my toe under the lever. If these are the boots I am always going to wear when riding I don't mind adjusting anything.
 

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The key is consistency. Such things are able to be adjusted with no problem, but there are certain cautions that go along with this. For instance, if you make those adjustments & then hop on the bike for a quick ride to the corner store with your sneakers on, the familiarity with the foot controls (and actual pedal feel) will be noticeably different than if you left them stock. At least in stock form, the controls were made to be suitable for a wide variety of foot sizes, footwear & rider positions. Going too far outside those parameters can risk safety, either by distraction or should you need those controls in a hurry & you're not wearing the boots that fit the adjustments you just made. At least, those are the conclusions I have come to after experimenting with different boots, pedal adjustments & the such. Each time I switched to the Thor dirt boots instead of my ususal ankle-height slim work boots while on the Suz DR650, I would lock up the rear tire (short skid) coming to a stop on the road. This would happen twice each ride before I would re-acquire the feel of the boots.The sole is so much thicker & more numb than the work boot, it took a little riding to re-acclimate to the feel of the boots. It also took some effort to get the boot consistently under the shifter correctly. The controls are stock.
 

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noj70 said:
As far as the rear brake goes, when I am riding long distances I don't always cover it and would like to get my toe under the lever. If these are the boots I am always going to wear when riding I don't mind adjusting anything.
Not to sure about the toe under the brake lever? Might be really tough in an emergency situation to get your toe out from underneath the lever and then apply the brake losing precious time. Maybe its different with the cruisers, but I have not seen a sportbike rider have their toe under the brake lever. :?:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The angle my foot has to be at to ride covering the brake is too uncomfortable. With smaller shoes I am able to get my toe under there. I guess it's time to just return the boots and try something different.
 

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noj70, I also was uncomfortable covering the rear brake pedal on my meanie until I put on a set of Kuryakyn pegs and stirrups. once you get them adjusted right for you they are very comfortable.
 

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On the Meanie, I ride with the brake foot offset to the side of the brake pedal. (Nice way of saying "pigeon-toed!)
 
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