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Alright, first thing I wanna do is introduce myself without boring you guys. I am a 16 year old living in Colorado. Going to turn 17 in a month or two. I have had almost no motorcycle expierence besides a friends little Vespa. However, from that, it has always been my goal to own a bike. I just knew I had to have one.

So a few months back, I started seriously researching the possibility. I found that many people recommend a Ninja 500r as a first bike, and from the many things I've already read on these forums, it looks like you guys will too.

However, that said, I am sure the majority of you guys are thinking "Great, another 16 year old on a fast bike that will become a statistic and give us all a bad name". I have already purchased 2 Motorcycle Safety books(Proficient Motorcycling and Street Strategies), which I will begin reading shortly. I, obviously, will go to a MSF class.

I never drink nor do any drugs, work about 20 hours a week while maintaining a 3.8 GPA and being involved in a few other activities at the school. I also have an '88 Toyota Supra that is a pretty fun car, but I stay out of trouble with it(no tickets, no accidents, no nothing).

That said, I am trying to convince my non-riding parents to allow me to purchase a Ninja 500r. I have gained incredible amounts of ground as the consensus went from "Never in my lifetime" to "maybe in college". However, I am still not satisified. The only real problem my mom has with it nowadays is the highway speeds, which is somewhat understandable, but I never commute on the highway except when going to a friends house, so it isn't a giant issue. I guess she just sees me going 65, hitting a little bump, and being thrown off my bike. So I am curious, are most of you riders out of high school? What do your parents think of your choices?

Now, another question pertaining to safety. Mufflers/exhaust. I've read that it can drop up to 20 lbs, which is certainly grreat in itself. However, since 4 wheeled morons have enough trouble spotting bikes, I figure that hearing them from a little bit away can only help my chances of staying out of an accident.

So I basically am looking for a muffler that can alert motorists of my presence, but not one that will wake the neighbors or become a nuisance. Any specifics you would recommend?

Anyway, I just finished blabbing on for about 3 paragraphs longer than I intended to. Thanks for reading. :)
 

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comeback_kid96 said:
That said, I am trying to convince my non-riding parents to allow me to purchase a Ninja 500r. I have gained incredible amounts of ground as the consensus went from "Never in my lifetime" to "maybe in college". However, I am still not satisified. The only real problem my mom has with it nowadays is the highway speeds, which is somewhat understandable, but I never commute on the highway except when going to a friends house, so it isn't a giant issue. I guess she just sees me going 65, hitting a little bump, and being thrown off my bike. So I am curious, are most of you riders out of high school? What do your parents think of your choices?
Being thrown off by a bump going 65? The bike is more stable at 65 than any speed slower than that. Get through the MSF course and you'll have more material to work with your parents on. I just kinda showed up at my 'rents house with a bike. They were kinda pissed tho. Its all good now, they've accepted it.
 

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you sound very smart and responsible but the chances of your parents accepting a bike are still going to be slim. I'm 33 yrs old and my mother still freaks out. I have had bikes since the age of 20 and she has never liked it. Have you looked at the 250 ninja, nice bikes and as a first bike great to learn the basics. Good luck, and let your parents see that you are interested in being safe as well as wanting to enjoy a great part of life.
 

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Loud pipes save lives. LOL

Never where truer words spoken ! NOT!

Loud pipes cost rights, loud pipes contibute to rider fatigue.

Only people who hear your pipes are the people you've already passed.

Highway's are probably one of the safest places to ride as long as you keep your speed appropriate in relation to other drivers. Everybody is going the same way!.

As for convincing you parents, well all that I can say is that if you demonstrate you are a responsable young man you're off to a good start. Personaly I had a bike for a few months when I was 18 and when my cousin killed himself on his, well let's just say that although I was legally an adult I was living at home and had to abide by their rules so the bike was sold.

Twenty years later I got back into riding.
 

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I would suggest trying to get them to go through the safety course with you. They will have an understanding and will be working with some of the same info you are. Besides, it's family time
 

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That's a great idea. I should try that. I'll be 40 years old next month and I haven't told my parents that I have a motorcycle. Naturally I have to keep the secret from my siblings so it doesn't leak out. I figure sooner or later my son is going to mention it. He already did once, but I don't think anyone believed him. We were at a restaurant with the whole family and the balloon girl came around and made a motorcycle balloon for him. She asked him if he had a motorcycle, and he said yes. I think everyone heard it, but four-year olds will say anything, so I don't think anyone thought anything of it. That was a few months ago, and I think the secret is still safe for now. Maybe my therapist should know about this.

comeback_kid96, you certainly sound responsible to me. No tickets, no accidents is a great record, especially for a 16-25 year old driving a Supra. And "I never drink" is a rare statement these days. Regardless of your reason, I applaud your accomplishment. What do you think of getting a dirt bike first? I think the parents would take that easier, and it would show them your genuine interest in motorcycles. Then you could add a street cycle to your fleet in another year or so. You might also consider a street-legal dirt bike. It's no Ninja, but it gets you into the scene.

A motorcycle makes great transportation for a college student: cheap insurance, not much gas, low capital investment, easy maintenance you can do yourself, and it's cool as all get out. Sell your parents on the first four, and you can have the fifth one for free.
Curt
 

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My dad has always had a motorcycle, but when I wanted to start, he and my mom both said no. When I was 20, I got my motorcycle permit without my parents knowledge, went out bought a dual sport dirt bike had a friend truck it home after I registered and insured it. When I got it home, I told them i bought it to replace my four-wheeler that I sold 2 years prior. After I praticed in the fields and in the woods, my dad asked me if the plates that were on it were for off road registration or on-road. He was hinting that he wanted to take me out riding on the street. That's when I let them know I had my permit and the bike was registered and insured for on-road use. After I showed them how responsible I was with the bike, my dad offered to teach me out on the streets.

This was the first thing I ever did behind my parents back, but I was determined. I figuered if my dad wasn't going to help me, I'd find a way to do it on my own.

My parents still don't like the idea of me riding, and I'm 27 now, but my dad does enjoy having someone else to go riding with.
 

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It's one of those strange situations, I love to ride but I realise how dangerous it is. It's one thing for me to take my life into my own hands and risk practicing a sport that presents dangers but for lives I'm responsable for well that's another matter altogeter.

My daughter is 13 and as I'm writing this, I'm hoping in the back of my mind that she doesn't ever want to get a motorcycle and am very happy that she doesn't enjoy riding with me ( she just doesn't find it fun and doesn't get the live to ride thing ), she is totaly into horses and is a very capable rider and has no interest in bikes.

And down the road I'm hoping the fact that dad has a bike will keep her away from bad boys on bikes cause dad might actually have something to talk about with her boyfriend.LOL

As a parent and as a moderator on this site I feel I have responsabilities to others, this is why my answers are always on the conservative side. A very close friend of mine is slowly getting the bug and is always asking for my advice and is starting to shop around for a bike. I would love to be able to ride with this long time friend but would feel absolutely horrible and responsable should anything happen to him or anybody else I gave advice to.

Simple fact is that we all have a different risk threshold and that this threshold varies on the circumstances. Just be thankfull that you have parents that care.
 

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Im 28, and my parents had a fit when I told them I bought a Ninja 500! But hey, when your an adult you make you own decisions, so I made mine and now I ride with my brother!

The safety course is the best thing you can do! You can be the best rider in the world, but that doesn't mean the guy next to you is... just keep that in mind. Also bike physics are much different from a car... so going fast is nice, stable and easy going, moving along slowly requires your experience and good habits to kick in. Them right turns off the stop sign are a pain when you are learning. Well ride safe, and be careful always. Good luck with your 'rents!
 

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parents can be funny
While i was in the Navy, i picked up a little Honda Silverwing to ride around the base and around town while i waited for my boat to leave. it was fun and i enjoyed riding. i gave it to the guy that took my bunk that was thinking of a bike. as far as i know, that bike is still there, being used by a crewman :)

when i came home, i bought another Silverwing, a little nicer and newer. Well i rode it home and my parents threw a FIT!!! my mom said it was too dangerous and i would kill myself. i just got off an aircraft carrier where everyday you could lose your life just walking to get some food.

in the end, they got over it. My mom still brings it up and insists I take her car whenever i want to go somewhere when i go home.

You will probably NEVER convince your parents that a bike is safe, because it's not.

btw: congrats on the whole no drinking thing, i never wanted to drink but i got into the Navy. It's sort of a requirement that you have to drink in the navy
 

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I'm 20, don't live at home. My mom about had a heart attack when I got my bike in Dec. It's stored in her garage and she's fine with it now.

Note: My mom got me a sky diving trip for my 18th b-day so I'm not really the best example. :lol: :twisted:

I think that's cool that you don't drink or do drugs. My little sister is still in hs and I find it amazing how many kids come to school drunk or high. :cry: I only graduated 3 yrs ago, and it's so much worse now. :roll:
 

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Just bought my 1st bike 3 weeks ago (I'm 27) and when I told my mom that I bought one she was PISSED!!! But once she realized that there was nothing that she could do she calmed down and now has been asking me to bring the bike over because the nephews want to see it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wow, I really wasn't expecting praise for not getting wasted every other weekend, but I guess you guys are a lot more mature than most. Thanks for all the compliments!
 

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I was in almost the same boat as you a few years ago. I'm 18 now. My dad had ridden a motorcycle in college but my parents had always said bikes were to dangerous. When I was 16 I really got into cars and so I bought a 1977 Trans Am to restore. Eventually though I became very drawn to bikes. So I went out and bought a 1970 Honda SL350 to "restore". My mom wasn't incredibly happy, but they say "It is easier to seek forgivness than permission." As I restored the bike my dad softened up to the idea of me riding. Now my mom just accepts it. I came home about a month ago all beat up pushing my friend's freshly wrecked 2002 CBR 600 F4i and she just kinda sighed and shook her head. Anyways I'm all healed up and now restoring a 1985 ZX900 :D (I however do not recommend wrecking bikes to test how well your parents have accpeted your new hobby)

I'm gonna agree with Uncle Bob about the loud pipe. I have a 95 Camaro Z28 with a pretty loud exhaust but you really can't hear it unless you are behind the pipes and it is really tiring when you are on the highway. Plus loud pipes makes you piggy bait.

Congrats on being able to keep a clear driving record and a clear head.
 

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comeback_kid96 said:
Wow, I really wasn't expecting praise for not getting wasted every other weekend, but I guess you guys are a lot more mature than most. Thanks for all the compliments!
i graduated about 7 years ago. i drank heavily at an early age and ended up being a drummer in an national punk band. it was alot of fun and im glad i did it. by the time i turned 19-20 i was done with it and just watched everyone else in colllege or in the navy do what i was doing a couple years ago :)

while it is good that you don't drink, or get high, or do anything. try and enjoy your life. While i don't condone drugs, it's much easier now to go out with your friends and get plastered when your 16 then when your 35. at 16 you don't really have that much responsability and your body can forgive you alot easier. not that i condone under-age drinking either, but i did it so i can't really tell someone else not to.
 

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re

my turn :lol:

comeback kid-you sound like you are very aware of the need to educate yourself and take
it one step at a time and i appluade you for that :wink:
at your age dealing with parents on this issue is gonna be tuff (i'm a parent) i had to do the same thing with mine to convince them to let me race mx bikes at your age and it was
difficult :( -what i learned was to be understanding about your parents concerns.they are only looking out for their son the best way they know how,so respect that.
it sounds like you have the right attitude to become a very good and safe rider and if you jump thru enough hoops to show your parents how concerned you are about safety that will go along way.be patient and try to get some off road seat time to further your skill levels
once you convice them that you are serious about riding and are not going to quite until you get your way :twisted: they will prolly come around-some compromise may be in order on your part-so be prepared for that - keep us posted and good luck :wink:

ride safe!
 
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