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Suggestions please.

I bought my son a new 2004 Ninja 250 last week. He is a new rider and rode it for a few days up and down the street. The other day he tried to start it, and it would not turn over. It cranks, but it won't start.

Dealer thinks the plug could be fouled. He suspects that my son did not turn off the choke. He wants me to bring it in, and he said he would have to charge me! I don't think I should have to pay, but how will I know if it was my sons fault or not?

Is it as difficult as my dealer says to change the spark plug myself on this bike?
 

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Motorcycle Momma
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Danny,

I would like to be the first to welcome you and your son to the forum......Congrats on your new 250 Ninja!!!!!!!

Someone who owns a Ninja will come up and answer you...there are lots of them. You may want to also purchase a Kawasaki repair manual for your bike......you won't have to depend on the dealer so much. It contains all of the specs and tuneup info you would need to keep her running sweeeeeet.

If the bike is still under warrentee then I would definitely take it back to the dealer and let them fix it for free. :roll: Stand up for your rights :evil:

Heather
 

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Not sure why the choke would contribute to anything. Turning the choke on is just like crankin' the throttle.
I have a 500r and the plugs are fairly easy to change. The hardest part is getting the gas tank off (which is just a few screws and pulling some tubes off). I would assume the 250 is similar.
I know this is crazy but I have to ask...are you sure there's gas in it and the petcock is turned to the 'on' position?
 

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Don't blame you for asking. Yeah, the batttery is charged, the kill switch is off, the bike in neutral, petcock on, and I think gas in the tank, let me see with my lighter ....
 

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WHOA! Try the cheap-fix first. Before you take off the tank or take the bike to the dealer$hip, simply de-flood it:

With the choke in the off position, twist the throttle all the way open and crank the starter for a few (5-7) seconds. Have a loose grip on the throttle and be prepared to let go immediately in case the engine decides to start up. Repeat this process twice for about 5 seconds and it should clear it out. Then let the bike stand still for a few dozen minutes.

Once you've done this, open the choke up half-way and start as normal (not twisting the throttle at all.)

This might sound like I'm setting you up for some sick joke, but what you're doing is clearing the chambers of excessive gas. Your sparkplugs are almost certainly fouled from using the choke for too long and by opening the throttle all the way with the rpms turning comparitively slowly, you're allowing a lean fuel-air mixture to enter the chambers. Do this in a well-ventilated area, as the unburnt fuel in the chambers will be flowing out the exhaust and you will get the gasoline smell.

Some people seem to have the incorrect idea that it's good for a bike to let it idle for a long time to warm-up gradually with the choke on. Start the bike up and don't let it idle for longer than it takes to put on your helmet and gloves. Then ride gently away and turn off the choke completely once you've surpassed 4,000-rpm the first time.

Here's an article from a very smart man named Gordon Jennings for breaking-in (and starting) your new motorcycle:
http://www.chrisandlisachan.com/break-in-game.htm

Good luck and let us know how it goes!
-Calamari Chris in Carlsbad, CA
 

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Tobydawg said:
Not sure why the choke would contribute to anything. Turning the choke on is just like crankin' the throttle.
I have a 500r and the plugs are fairly easy to change. The hardest part is getting the gas tank off (which is just a few screws and pulling some tubes off). I would assume the 250 is similar.
I know this is crazy but I have to ask...are you sure there's gas in it and the petcock is turned to the 'on' position?
Hi Toby,
No disrespect intended, but your statement is wrong and I must correct it. Opening the choke on the 250R is NOT the same as cranking the throttle. It is the same on some modern fuel-injected bikes (and the changed the name to fast-idle to avoid confusion. With a fuel-injected bike, the heat-sensors basically tell the fuel-injection system that the engine is cold and automatically richen the mixture for you.
And really the "choke" on our carbureted bikes isn't really a literal "choke" anymore either, but an enrichener circuit that allows the same airflow as idle, but a higher flow of fuel, making the fuel/air mix richer.

Here's an excellent article by the late-great Gordon Jennings about breaking in (and starting) new motorcycles:
http://www.chrisandlisachan.com/break-in-game.htm

-CCinC
 

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No disrespect intended, but your statement is wrong and I must correct it. Opening the choke on the 250R is NOT the same as cranking the throttle. It is the same on some modern fuel-injected bikes (and the changed the name to fast-idle to avoid confusion. With a fuel-injected bike, the heat-sensors basically tell the fuel-injection system that the engine is cold and automatically richen the mixture for you.
And really the "choke" on our carbureted bikes isn't really a literal "choke" anymore either, but an enrichener circuit that allows the same airflow as idle, but a higher flow of fuel, making the fuel/air mix richer.
None taken :) I'm glad I know now...I just always thought that logically, that's what the choke did. thanks for your help! :D
 

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If the bike is still under warrentee then I would definitely take it back to the dealer and let them fix it for free. Stand up for your rights
EXCUSE ME!
Warrentys cover manufacter parts,defects and the damage they cause.
I would like to know why the dealer should fix something that was caused by customer ignorance such as riding with the choke on. Also probbly not reading the ownners manual either.
The dealer should check it and deal with what they find. A diagnostic fee of a (1/2) half an hour could be charged to Kawasaki and the plugs can be changed in a (1/2) half an hour.
The dealer can sell it too KMC. as customer relation. < If he wants too.
Buy a shop Manual.
 

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Change the plugs yourself.

I just did it myself the other day on my EX 500 and it worked! Heck, I even had a full tank of gas to contend with. I didn't need to disconnect any tubes either. I just lifted the tank and turned it about 45 degrees until I could get my tools down down in there (it helps to put a piece of styrofoam under the tank to support it). Be careful unscrewing the plug though. Lots of dirt and grime can fall off and cause trouble. After you get the plugs out, use a vacuum to suck the the dirt out from around the holes. Make sure you've got the right plugs, too! My fouled plugs were "D9s", which aren't suitable in colder weather. So I put "D8s" in. I suspect that's what caused the problem in the first place.

Go ahead and try it! It'll only cost you about $10 bucks and you'll feel great when she starts up again!
 
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