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I have been riding with my boyfriend on his R6 and have become addicted to the thing. I decided to purchase my own bike but I have not driven one before. I bought a ninja 250 last night. I wanted to drive before I bought one, but I cant learn on his R6 and my team oregon class isnt til the end of March. I got the bike now because I figured prices would start going up as the temp does. Today, after handing over $3,000 I am starting to worry that maybe a made a choice too quickly. I am not some hardass chick. I have never been good at riding bicycles and I think I am just really scared now that I wont be good at it or I wont ever feel comfortable riding.

any thoughts?
 

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Slow Guy on a Fast Bike
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Step back, take a deep breath.....and try not to worry about things. My Wife echoed a very similar sentiment when she purchased her first bike. The very first time we took it to a parking lot to practice, she was 100% sure she had made a terrible mistake. Fast forward 6 years later, an by all accounts she rides like a pro. We've been on multiple thousand mile trips, and she loves to ride easily as much as I do. In fact, after she took the MSF course and obtained her license we were heading down the California coast (2500 miles from home) and only a short 6 months after she uttered the "I think i've made a mistake" comments.

So, it seems as if you have signed up for a motorcycle safety/training course. That in of itself shows you have your head screwed on correctly. Take your time, try not to think too far past "Chapter 1" of learning to ride. Concentrate on learning a couple or few basic skills at a time, and eventually it will come to you. surround yourself with a couple good experianced riders who are interested in helping you learn. Stay away from those riders who you do not feel comfortable riding with or learning from. Take it all in at your own pace, and try to remember that you are taking the first step in what will be a long and very enjoyable journey.

It will come to you, that's an almost guarantee. In a few years you will look back at this period and have a good chuckle.
 

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Sick Puppy
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Just practice what you learn at the riding class until it becomes second nature, then enjoy. Like Trike said, ride at your own pace, don't let anyone pull you in over your head.
 

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Rolling with the big dogs
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It will be ok. I bought my bike before I took the class too. I started to think that I made a big mistake. After I took the class I was sure that I made a big mistake! I practiced what I learned in class everyday on a dead end road that leads to a middle school near my house. After a month, I was comfortable enough to ride side streets. I was terrified the first time I got on the expressway and luckily the next exit was only one mile away! It took a couple of months before I would try the expressway again. I didn't beome truly comfortable with riding until I had about 3000 miles under my belt. I'm glad I didn't let my nerves get the better of me. By the way, I still go to the dead end street to practice and will probably practice stuff (especially u-turns) I learned until I no longer ride. Don't worry, just take your time, visit this site and ask advice from trike, bubba, rick and company. You won't go wrong listening to them (don't tell them I said it).
 

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Cookie Monstress
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LOL !! ahhh brings back memories. Your worries are groundless and you will 'get it' and have many great rides ahead of you. You do not become a 'hardass" chick...LOL...

Trikebubble did give you great advice... particularly dont let some guy (or gal) intimidate you into trying something you are not ready for. Go your own speed and take it easy for a long time. Dont ride illegally without your endorsement either... (smile..).. as MSF is gonna show you some basic skills you really need.

One final thought... in a thousand or two miles you may actually start to feel like you really finally fully understand riding... and from experience I can tell you that is a dangerous time...and dont give in to it and start pushing too hard or fast. You will always be learning and you need to keep a healthy respect for what is coming at you that you may not have seen before or practiced enough.

Welcome to riding !!

Annie

I have been riding with my boyfriend on his R6 and have become addicted to the thing. I decided to purchase my own bike but I have not driven one before. I bought a ninja 250 last night. I wanted to drive before I bought one, but I cant learn on his R6 and my team oregon class isnt til the end of March. I got the bike now because I figured prices would start going up as the temp does. Today, after handing over $3,000 I am starting to worry that maybe a made a choice too quickly. I am not some hardass chick. I have never been good at riding bicycles and I think I am just really scared now that I wont be good at it or I wont ever feel comfortable riding.

any thoughts?
 

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worlds fastest cub scout?
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Two things:

1. Buyers remorse is common any time you part w/chunks of cash, especially on something with a degree of the unknown (like your new bike).
2. You're doing it right so far. T.O.= good. Ninja 2.5= good. Plus, you have the benefit of being an Oregon Chick, which by default means you WILL kick ***. Stay with it. Come the first sunny day when you are out ripping up hwy 47, you'll look back and laugh.

Thas right. mm hmm.
 

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First of all CONGRATS... I love riding and once you get rid of the initial free you will to.

Second: You picked a very good bike for your first bike (per my husband who has been trying to sell me on a Ninja 250 since I started riding). My husband, who happens to be an MSF certified instructor says that the Ninja 250 is a great bike to start out with because it's light weight, fast but not to fast and nice looking. He says that one of the biggest mistakes new riders make is getting a bike that is to powerful for them to handle.

So if you ask me, which I think you did, I would have to say that you made a good choice as long as the bike is in good condition.

I have a few questions for you... Have you taken an MSF certified New Rider Course yet?

If you have not yet taken the NRC that would be my first suggestion to you... I would look for one that provides the motorcycles instead of using your own. After you take the NRC move on to some parking lot drills with your boy friend (don't tell my husband I said that because I hated them when he use to want to take me to the parking lot), then mix in those parking lot drills with some riding in a quite residential neighborhood. After the practice you will be a riding enthusiast in no time.

If, after you've taken the NRC and completed parking lot drills and quite residential neighborhoods and you still don't like riding - sell your bike and get back on the back of your boyfriends R6 because in the end any riding is good riding.

I hope this helps and I wish you all the best
 

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Welcome to the family of females who no longer wish to be back rests. First let me tell you that there is no other feeling like that of a rider on their bike, racking up miles and enjoying the great outdoors. Secondly, you have every right to be apprehensive at first. When I took the class in 2008 I told my then boyfriend that it was just so that I would be a better passenger. Ten days later, I rode out of a parking lot on a new Honda Shadow 750, scared, timid and excited all at the same time. I have recently purchased my second bike (2007 Kawasaki Mean Streak Special Edition) because I felt like I needed more. This year I'll be taking the course to become a rider coach. You too can overcome the fear of being a new rider. Remember, no matter what, it's YOUR ride. No one elses. Go as slow as you want or as fast as you are comfortable with. Soon you'll be planning your next adventure while complaining about PMS (Parked Motorcycle Syndrome). Good luck.
 

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'06 V2K, Baby!
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I guess I'll chime in late to say that your feelings aren't unique to women. Certainly I was scared and worried in my early days of riding. I'm still nervous after a couple years of riding when the road gets tricky or just after winter and I don't have my skills ramped back up after their winter hibernation.

Fear is good - it keeps you safe - as long as you control it and it doesn't control you.
 

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High, Wide, and Lonesome
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58 Posts
I have been riding with my boyfriend on his R6 and have become addicted to the thing. I decided to purchase my own bike but I have not driven one before. I bought a ninja 250 last night. I wanted to drive before I bought one, but I cant learn on his R6 and my team oregon class isnt til the end of March. I got the bike now because I figured prices would start going up as the temp does. Today, after handing over $3,000 I am starting to worry that maybe a made a choice too quickly. I am not some hardass chick. I have never been good at riding bicycles and I think I am just really scared now that I wont be good at it or I wont ever feel comfortable riding.



any thoughts?
Do the class!!!!!
I've been riding for over 40 years and the class was good for me.
Ride to your own ability - if they 'take off' ..... you'll catch up - not to worry. If you don't, Oh, Well, they are not good for you to ride with anyway.
Don't be too afraid - fear is the mind-killer. Know your bike - know thyself ..... all else will follow ...... and Ride, Ride, Ride.
By the time you get your second rear and your first new front - or 10K miles you are well on your way. Wear your gear! Watch down the road! Expect idiots.

Cages DO NOT SEE BIKES ...... it's an "eye" thing. If it does not have eyes - they don't see it - no matter how bright your highbeam. Expect everyone out there to do the wrong thing at the wrong time - be ready and relax, you miss things when you are tense - alert, but relaxed, will get you through.
Be safe and remember, "You are the Softest Thing Out There".
 

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I know that this is the ladies only posting area but i couldnt help but look( couriosity kills more than cats). my wife had the same apprehensiveness when we got her the same bike. my recomendation is look into a motorcycle safty course lowers your insurence along with builds cofidence(it helped her alot) also if you live in or around a residental area where speeds are lower and is less hecktic than surface streets try there to build your self up. other than that just short rides untill your comfertable and comfident.

lots of luck
 

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Female barge jockey
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I think riding is a lot about confidence, that comes with practice. However before you get the practice there is a tip which may help. If you give yourself time in all situations things become a lot easier. For example braking early gives you a lot of time to think about gears, where you will stop, where the hazards are and to make a plan to take off again. Give yourself time and you will control your own destiny. Don't let traffic rush you, you have a right to be there and they can wait.
 

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'06 V2K, Baby!
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Well, this is a year-old thread but I'm curious now. Hey RipCity, how's the confidence?

-B
 

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I'm curious about RipCity's confidence as well. I purchased my bike before taking the New Rider Safety Course here in Louisville. I take the course next weekend. The other day I tried to start my bike without turning the choke to "on" (its getting a bit chilly here in the mornings) and turning the fuel to tap to on. Then my bike stalled on me because I later found out that I did not give it enough time to warm up. I'm starting to think that I will never get it (i.e., learn how a bike works,let alone, learn how to ride one). Discouraged.
 

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My advice;ask questions, seek help when you have electrical or mechanical problems with the bike. Get a factory shop manual,read it, so you understand the terms.

Manuals (Some of these websites sell used manuals, just ask)
Repair Manual | Owners Manual | Haynes Repair Manual | RepairManual.com
ManualsNMore.com: Factory Service Motorcycle & Auto Repair Manuals
http://www.midwestmanuals.com/
Books4Cars.com - Every Repair Manual, Service Manual, Owners Manual and Book for your Car, Truck and Motorcycle
RepairManualClub Download Area
Motorcycles maluals
Vintage and classic motorcycle manuals and literature

There are shop manuals from Haynes,Chilton & Clymer, but I trust the factory shop manual from Kawasaki more.
 

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Open mouth, insert foot..
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UMMmmmm - Mike, this is a year and a half old thread, the bike is (WAS!) a NEW one, not a vintage one, and her question was one of her capability and wisdom in buying the bike, NOT how to maintain it - and, to top it all off, the OP hasn't even been back since her one-and-only single post in March of LAST year...

Gotta start actually READING the posts before starting the cut-and-paste routine! :)
 

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HEY MY BEAUTIFUL LADIES !! I RECENTLY STARTED RIDING RECENTLY AND I WILL AGREE THAT CONFIDENCE PLAYS A BIG PART IN IT. FOR SOME REASON WHEN I FIRST STARTED PRACTICING I WASN'T NERVOUS AT ALL WHICH HELPED A LOT. LET'S NOT TRY TO LIVE UP TO THE HYPE OF WHAT EVERYONE ELSE DOING ... RIDING WITH HEELS OR OTHER THINGS JUST TO BE ON THEIR LEVEL. STAY IN YOUR LANE AND PRACTICE AN EVENTUALLY U WILL GET TO WHERE U WANT TO BE.

STAY PROTECTED AND WEAR YOUR GEAR I SEE A LOT OF WOMEN WANTING TO BE EXTRA SEXY AND GET ALL SCRATCHED UP BECAUSE THEY WERE HALF BUTT *** NAKED, LOL

HAVE FUN !! SAFE FUN!! AND LET'S RIDE ?.

MUCH LOVE AND RESPECT FROM BK !



Sent from my iPhone using MO Free
 

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UMMmmmm - Mike, this is a year and a half old thread, the bike is (WAS!) a NEW one, not a vintage one, and her question was one of her capability and wisdom in buying the bike, NOT how to maintain it - and, to top it all off, the OP hasn't even been back since her one-and-only single post in March of LAST year...

Gotta start actually READING the posts before starting the cut-and-paste routine! :)
Example 2
 

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I started riding "tank" when I was 3 with my dad. Fast forward: 20 years old. I bought an old rattletrap Sportster. Never having ridden myself or taking a class, I got on it, popped the clutch, stalled and tipped over. Sigh....I figured out how not to tip over, and where the "sweet spot" was on the clutch. I went into a panic (why, I'm not sure) and dumped it. Ok, I dumped it a few times. LOL. I was by myself, no one to show me the ins and outs. Fast forward again another 30 years. Although I had been successfully riding for many years now, I decided I was going to ride my husband's Ultra Classic. Once again I went into a panic, (why-couldn't tell ya), and hit a wall head on. Thankfully I was in a parking lot and going slow.

My point, after this diatribe, is don't give up. Don't let your apprehension take over. Keep reminding yourself that you CAN and WILL ride just as well, or better than your boyfriend.

Yes, I know the original post is 9 years old, but others may look at it, just like I did.

Much love
 
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