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Hey Everybody!

Well as you can guess by the subject line I'm new here. Just discovered this board and have been reading it and just had to join. I'm hopefully picking up a bike next summer. I've narrowed it down to the 250r or the Eliminator 125. I'll post more about that in the other forum. I look forward to chatting with everybody and helping as many as I can. Let the good times roll.
 

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Do yourself a huge favor and skip the Eliminator 125 all together. You'll be bored enough with a 250 after only a few weeks of riding, and a 125 Eliminator isn't even freeway worthy.

For the cost of the Eliminator (about $2,500) you'd be better off finding something like what I had...an '84 Honda Nighthawk 700SC. I bought it with just 15k miles, and for only $1900. All the bodywork had just been replaced with NOS (New Old Stock) and it had new tires and a new battery. I managed to wring 7,500 worry-free miles out of her in just one year, and traded her in on my new Mean Streak (and got $2,200 for trade).

In any case, your money will be better spent on a used >500cc bike. If you manage to save up $3k (enough for a new Ninja 250) get a late 80's early 90's UJM for about $2k and dump some of the remaining grand into gear, repairs, and upgrades. You'll be happier in the end.
 

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Welcome to the forum, 2002firebirdguy! I think you'll like it here.

Whatever you choose, ride safe, and have fun :)
 

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Lots of people (including ZooTech above) will tell you to get a big bike. Don't listen to them. They will tell you that you will get bored. I think that depends on you more than on them. Some people always want more. Since you're looking at the 250 and the 125, I'll bet you're not one of those people.

Personally, I love the small engine bikes. I like the looks of the Eliminator 125, but I've never ridden one. I don't know how it does for power, especially freeway power. I suspect it doesn't have much, but I don't know that personally.

I do know that the Ninja 250 is a powerful and fast bike. I have never needed all the power that this bike has. Freeway passing is super easy -- just shift down, goose it, and it will stand up and talk. This bike can do a lot more than I can do with it. I have a friend who has grown up on motorcycles, and he has been on my Ninja a few times. It is amazing what my bike can do with a really good driver.

Comparing the 125 to the Ninja 250, I like that the 250 is a two cylinder (smoother), and has a water-cooled engine and four valves per cylinder. I also like that the Ninja 250 is so popular, so parts are plentiful from dealers and junkyards.

Some people buy a small bike with the idea of building their skills, then moving to a bigger bike. I think that's pretty smart. Other people say that you're wasting your money on a small bike if you're going to sell it later. It sounds reasonable until you look at actual numbers. The opposite is true. Small bikes are less expensive, and the longer you ride them, the better you come out financially. If you're like me, you have no intention of moving to something bigger. I love my Ninja 250R!

But I think that the first thing you need to decide is whether to get a sportbike or a cruiser. If you're not sure, I would suggest the cruiser. I bought a sportbike because I love the sportbike look, but a cruiser is easier for a beginner to control, and it's less expensive to repair a minor accident. A minor accident on a Ninja could include a couple of cracked fairings, and that's hundreds of dollars of damage. I think that cruisers tend to have more gentle throttles, brakes, and steering than sportbikes. And because of their wheelbase, weight, and center of gravity, they are much less likely to do accidental wheelies or stoppies. Also, for many people a cruiser has a more comfortable seating position.

If I were in the market for a cruiser, I'd definitely have a good, hard look at the Eliminator 125. But if it can't pass well on the highway, I'd probably go for something like the 500LTD. Lots of people get a 500LTD as a beginner bike.

I don't want to push you away from the 125. It might be a great bike, with all the power you need. If you just need a commuter, it might be perfect for you. But make sure you get to drive one before you buy it.
Curt
 

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Howdy,

I'm new here too. And not alot to do today as well... I like the topics with this forum.

Anyways, Check your state laws. In Washington, a 125 is not leagle on the hiways or freeways posted over 55mph. Though I have ridden some 125's well above that.
 

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Curt said:
Lots of people (including ZooTech above) will tell you to get a big bike. Don't listen to them. They will tell you that you will get bored. I think that depends on you more than on them. Some people always want more. Since you're looking at the 250 and the 125, I'll bet you're not one of those people.
Curt
I'd hardly consider a 500cc motorcycle "big". In fact, I think with the release of the Vulcan 2000, the VTX 1800, the Warrior, and the new Triumph, eBay will have to re-think their categorization method of >700cc = large.

A 500 would have been considered "big" in the 70's, when a lot of people were riding Honda 350's around. Nowadays, a 500cc is definately a small beginner bike, and a 250cc motorcycle is something you fold up and stick in your backpack.

I started out on a 500cc Honda, moved up to a 700cc 4-cylinder (80HP/50ft.lbs. torque), and now have my Mean Streak (700+ lbs.). I'm here to tell ya, a nice early 90's Yamaha Fazer or an Interceptor would be a fine machine to learn on. Bikes like that handle well, brake well, and are easy to find parts for. You'll be better off spending $3k on a 10-year-old used 500+ cc four cylinder than on a brand new 250cc scooter. I'm tellin' you because my two best friends and I all started out of 500's (a GL500i and a CX500) and by the end of the riding season all we could talk about was what bikes we were going to replace them with come Spring. Now I ride a Mean Streak (after stepping up to the aforementioned Nighthawk 700SC), my best friend is on a Harley Sportster 883 (and will be rebuilding the engine to 1200 spec this winter), and my other friend is thinking of trading the GL500i (that my other friend sold him when he got his Sportster) for a Suzuki M50, S83, or Yamaha Warrior (depending on his finances come Spring).

If you want to blow $2500-3000 on an Eliminator or Ninja 250, by all means go ahead...it's your money.

*************************************************************

It'd be nice to know how old you are, how tall you are, and how much you weigh.

Me, I'm 27 years old, 5'10", and about 210lbs. I once rode a Nighthawk 250, and it felt like a glorified moped. It certainly wasn't anything I'd be crazy enough to enter a freeway with.

Personally, I think a good rule of thumb to go by is to look for a bike that weighs at least twice as much as you. For me, that would rule out anything in the 250 class and immediately force me to look at bikes like the Suzuki SV650 or V-Strom. I suppose if you're a lightweight, perhaps a Ninja 250 may be a decent first bike....but I'd pay close attention to semis on the freeway and would pass with caution. My mom (5'4" ~115lbs) got blown over by a semi while riding a Honda Rebel 450, and subsequently did a 75mph Superman (err....Woman) across three lanes of freeway where she ended up in a ditch, essentially okay except for a concussion and some gravel in her elbow. That is why I recommend a late 80's or early 90's UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) for a beginner, regardless of engine size (but at least a 500) since they're usually easy to repair, easy to find parts for (eBay) and generally have some decent heft to them because of their steel frames.

Folks here think they're doing you a huge favor by recommending a 250 since you're a beginner. But if you're that much of a newbie, you need to avoid the road all together and go learn how to ride on a nice used 4-stroke dirtbike (maybe even an enduro, so you could enter the road when the time is right). That way if you fall over, you'll land in some nice soft dirt and maybe bend some $20 handlebars at worst. Once you've got the balancing/clutching/leaning/shifting thing down, a 500cc streetbike will be a piece of cake. I'm tellin' ya, unless you're like 5'6" and weigh 150lbs or less, you'll kick yourself for buying a 250, and you'll want to throw a 125 into a lake.
 

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what part of wash are you in snopup?
 

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Uncle Bob/freakin/Bikeaholic you want to field zootech's last posts before I call him SOAD again :D

Buy what you're comfortable with, a ninja 250 with me on it (6'4" 290lbs.) will still hit 100+ in a fast amount of time, unless you feel the need to be a "big man" and get something you can't handle go with what you like.

I still drive my 750 that weighs in at 500lbs. and I love it
 

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re

opinions are like a#@!^&*^ - everybody has one :p

some folks don't like low cc bikes ,some do,some it don't matter its a bike

as far as suggesting starter bikes-the new rider will usually go with the majority and that will be fairly clear from the riders here :wink:
 

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Stuart said:
Uncle Bob/freakin/Bikeaholic you want to field zootech's last posts before I call him SOAD again :D
Yeah....better shut me up, ban my username, burn my crops, and salt my fields for speaking from PERSONAL EXPERIENCE and the PERSONAL EXPERIENCE of two of my closest friends. After all, it's not like you're talking from PERSONAL EXPERIENCE with a Ninja 250, and getting away with it......but disagreeing with people in this forum seems to be some sort of taboo...... :roll:

Stuart said:
Buy what you're comfortable with, a ninja 250 with me on it (6'4" 290lbs.) will still hit 100+ in a fast amount of time
Since when is a bike's 0-100mph time a good gauge for whether or not it is a good bike for beginners? I thought recommending a larger bike was a "bad thing" since it might actually contain enough power to get out of its own way, and keep its owner entertained for more than a week.

Stuart said:
unless you feel the need to be a "big man" and get something you can't handle go with what you like.
Yeah....I'm a "big man" cause I ride a Mean Streak.....that's why I've been bragging about it so much in other threads..... :? :roll:

Stuart said:
I still drive my 750 that weighs in at 500lbs. and I love it
Point being? I would have loved to have been able to keep my Nighthawk....but finances dictated that it be used for trade-in. I was quite happy with its 700cc mill, I just wanted more power and size after our trip to Chicago (from Central Ohio) made my bike's weaknesses more apparent. From that trip I learned that I prefer torque over horsepower, which a big bore V-Twin seems to be better at delivering. The other bikes I considered were the V-Strom, ZRX1200R, and the Suzuki Bandit 1200. The Mean Streak fit the bill because regardless of who I was riding with (crotch rockets or cruisers) I felt the Meanie would fit in. I also considered the Yamaha VMAX, but the suspension is in such desperate need of an update that I found it too unsafe to blow $11k on.
 

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Spok,
I'm in the Tri-Cities. I recently moved here from Everett. It's a hot one this week, triple digits thru Saturday. Rides along the rivers are nice. Miss the trees though.
 
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