Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been riding my 900 custom since January. I now have over 8000 miles on this sweet ride. Recently began developing a relationship with a woman and would like to see if she could enjoy riding along with me.

Given that I am a newbie riding a 900 custom, what would you recommend I do as I attempt to ride with someone else? I thought about starting off in a large parking lot, but I wonder about gear for her. What if she doesn't like it? I figure I shoudn't invest until I'm sure she's going to enjoy it.

And what about the ride? I've been a passenger before and was told to move with them, don't put your feet down until told to do so, etc... And what about the seat on the custom ? Do I have to have a new one and a sissy bar, or can I go ahead and introduce her to riding with my current set up?

Can you see my line of thinking? What pointers/guidance do you have for this newbie?
 

·
98' 1500 Classic
Joined
·
978 Posts
I think if you've already logged 8k mi you're more than ready to have her just jump on the back and go for a ride. Take an easy route untill you get the feel of having somebody on the back. I tell all my passingers to just sit still and dont wiggle. i tell them when to get on and when to get off, so I'm ready for it. thats all i tell them. as far as gear, come on, good pair of jeans, boots, helmet (if you wear them), and a jackett. figure out the rest later. as far as equipping the bike, I would recommend a backrest. more than one newby pass has fallen off the back. i don't think its any big deal, just take her for a ride.

do yo have a classic or custom? you stated both in the post.
 

·
Missy Peregrym's #1 fan!
Joined
·
7,792 Posts
you may have to get use to stopping as well at first... takes a little more squeeze if you plan on stopping like normal (which i dont recommend) i find myself slowing down much more in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
588 Posts
More weight over the rear wheels means your rear brake is more affective than normal. Use it. Take it easy on twisties until the passenger is used to the leaning of the bike. Get some decent gear so theya re comfortable if you want them to keep riding with you. If you are doing helmet-optional, make sure they understand the risks so they make an informed choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
2-up requires a little more balancing on your part with your passenger, especially in the start ups and stops. #1 when you start and stop be sure that your passenger remains still, any wobble or squirming around will throw your balance off. #2 don't have your passenger counter lean around corners lean as you lean have the passenger flow with the curves, start with baby steps don't go into heavy twisties at the git go. #3 have some communications signals before hand, thumbs up for ready to go, pat on the sholder to stop keep it simple.

Make sure she is comfortable on the rear pillon, if the ole derriere is sitting on hard seats it tends to cause the passenger to squirm around, not to bad when underway but steady as she goes when stopping and starting.

I am in the process of modifying my rear seat to make it more comfortable for my wife as she has had tailbone injury in the past and need the comfort level kicked up a notch.

Love it when they want to come along with you on your rides 2-up is great and if you break them in right, short rides to start with ,nothing scary, no showing off , you will make a great riding partner that will start bugging you to go on rides.........
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,070 Posts
There are 3 things that I had to really pay attention to when riding 2 up:
- it takes longer to accelerate due to the weight. Take it easy on the throttle or your passenger is gonna get whiplash.
- it takes longer to decelerate. Take it easy on the brakes and give yourself lots more room or your passenger is gonna headbutt you a lot.
- put both feet down when you stop. The bike is significantly more top heavy, so practice using just the front brake in the last 5 ft. of your stop while being ready to plant both feet firmly.

If you are really nervous about having a passenger, strap on 2 50 lb. bags of potatoes and hit the giant parking lot. And above all else, never let your passenger know you are nervous. Her increased anxiety will get you both killed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,749 Posts
Make your starts and stops like you're on a wet road or you'll get tired of her head banging into the back of yours. I recommend getting out of town by the shortest way possible to open road where you can get comfortable together without too many distractions. You want her to be as comfortable as possible and don't need to show her how fast you can go.
 

·
MaNaMaNa DoDoDoDoDo
Joined
·
4,767 Posts
OK.
1. Gear.
2. Get on/off when you give OK. (doesn't mean immediately if she isn't ready)
3. Always keep feet on passenger pegs
4. When going around a curve she is to look over the shoulder of the direction of the curve.
5. NO squirming (especially in curves)
6. She MUST pay attention to everything around. Extra pair of eyes is always good.
7. Accelerate and shift smoothly. Braking smoothly too.
8. Have hand signals for her comfort. (Slow down, I need to get off, I need to get off NOW, Pee break, I am having a great time, etc)

When my passenger gets on and off, I have the bike in neutral and running, with the side stand down. Too many passengers put all their weight on the left peg which can cause the bike to lean dangerously and over you go. That's embarrassing.

Just remember, you are only as good a rider as how comfortable your passenger feels.
 

·
PColaFl V2K LT
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
Hard to add anything to that list. Looks just about perfect. Oh... Keep your boots OFF the pipes!! LOL
Seriously, These guys have hit it right on.
 

·
Deeppurple52
Joined
·
2,072 Posts
Riding 2-up is an essential skill. It is really very easy. I see no difference in accelerating, turning or general riding. The one thing that takes practice is stopping. Not physically stopping but doing it smoothly. Just tell yourself to "roll all the way to a stop" before putting your feet down. This will aid your balance and make riding 2-up a pleasure. One of the first things I made my wife do when she started riding was to ride 2-up. It made her a better rider. Smooth starts and smooth stops will do the trick.
You might suggest to your friend that you take a few laps around the block for HER to get used to being on the bike! You both win... you get the feel of having someone onboard and she learns to ride properly.
One last thing. Make sure you brief her not to lean and NEVER put her feet down. It's easy, enjoy it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
OK.
1. Gear.
2. Get on/off when you give OK. (doesn't mean immediately if she isn't ready)
3. Always keep feet on passenger pegs
4. When going around a curve she is to look over the shoulder of the direction of the curve.
5. NO squirming (especially in curves)
6. She MUST pay attention to everything around. Extra pair of eyes is always good.
7. Accelerate and shift smoothly. Braking smoothly too.
8. Have hand signals for her comfort. (Slow down, I need to get off, I need to get off NOW, Pee break, I am having a great time, etc)

When my passenger gets on and off, I have the bike in neutral and running, with the side stand down. Too many passengers put all their weight on the left peg which can cause the bike to lean dangerously and over you go. That's embarrassing.

Just remember, you are only as good a rider as how comfortable your passenger feels.
Very good advice. Another one I would say is if you are new to it ask your partner to relax, flow with the bike and try not to make too many quick head movements from side to side looking at the world going by as this can make you a bit unstable especially at low speed. Make it nice and smooth, if your pillion is relaxed you will not even know they are there, Before now I have had an ex of mine almost fall asleep while on the back. (good job there was a sissy bar)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
thank you all for very helpful information. It was difficult during stopping when I had a passenger first time while ago. Now I know that it is a common issue and expected one. I think I will do better next time.
 

·
Patriot Guardian
Joined
·
28,016 Posts
YOU might be ready, but if she's never ridden before, she may not be.

Like learning to ride, some people are naturals and "get it" quickly, others never "get it" and give up after a few unplanned dismounts.

Same for passengers. The problem is, when a passenger doesn't "get it", they endanger both of you. A co-worker tried taking his wife a few times, and eventually told her to NEVER get on a bike again. Even with hours of "instruction", she would always lean against the turn and took him down twice.

Standard recommendation for a first passenger is not your wife/GF, and certainly not a child.

If you don't know of any experienced passengers or riders willing to help you learn how your bike will respond to a passenger, then take it VERY slow... parking lots at first, only straight lines and WIDE sweepers, gradually working into a realistic radius for a right/left turn on the street.

Once she is comfortable with "normal" turns, bump the speed a bit and teach her what the bike will feel like if you need to make a quick evasive maneuver.

The last thing you'll learn is parking-lot speed/radius turns.
Even with over 7k of 2-up riding, I still do my best to avoid u-turns with my wife on the back.

For starters, tell her that when you're turning left, she should look OVER your left shoulder, and look over your right shoulder for right turns. If she does that, it will be more natural for her to avoid leaning against the turn.
 

·
Deeppurple52
Joined
·
2,072 Posts
U-turns 2-up? What's the issue? Both my wife and I have done it many, many times. If you are somewhat skilled and comfortable on your bike it isn't a problem. If you are going to ride 2-up, do not be affraid to ride your bike as the situation requires. We never fret over tight turns, it is just part of riding and isn't much different with one or two onboard. Mind-set is everything. If you think it is a problem, it certainly will be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
two things i can thing of is, lean With you. and get a passenger backrest. I NO LIE lost a passenger on my 800B once..... I pulled out hard and off went the passenger. he did a backflip off the bike.. he wasnt hurt very badly but it could have been really bad. We both laughed about it later.. lol all the sudden my bike got really lite.. lol..

chris
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top