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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody. I need some advice. I'm planning to go cross-country this year (late Spring/early Summer). I intend to ride to Cali and fly back home. I am going to ship the bike back to NYC. My questions are:
1) Has anyone completed this trip?, and if so do you have any hard-earned wisdom that may aid me in my journey?
2) Just as important; what advice can you impart on shipping a bike cross country? Does anybody have any companies that they would recommend from personal experience?

Thanks :mrgreen:
 

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We need a Sarcasm Font!
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Hey, good luck! Sounds like a great ride.

My hubby road from AL to WA a couple of summers ago. Main piece of advice is to pack some good, light-weight travel clothes that you can wash out in the sink at night. They'll be dry in the a.m. and they pack really small. And be sure to bring rain gear.

If you're a member of the AMA, they have some deals on shipping your bike. They also have a really good membership deal. If you join on line and sign up to renew automatically with your credit card info, you get roadside assistance for everyone in your family on every vehicle you have - cars, bikes, 4-wheelers. I think it's like $70 per year.

Have a great trip and take lots of pics!!
 

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Winter Warrior
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1) Travel as far south as you can before you go west :)

2) I used motorcycle-shippers.com when I moved from DE to CA, price was reasonable ( but before the horrendous gas price hike of 2 years ago ) and they treated my bike very well.
 

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soft drinks & stiff women
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Still having fun!
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I rode from California to Iowa & back last year. I found that earplugs were a must, as well as an Air Hawk cushion. Rain gear, small first aid kit, tire sealant, flashlight, small tool kit, maps. I also found that my mesh jacket (with removable liner) was helpful crossing the desert. (an evaporative vest is also a great investment) Take time to enjoy the trip & the scenery!
 

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I rode from California to Iowa & back last year. I found that earplugs were a must, as well as an Air Hawk cushion. Rain gear, small first aid kit, tire sealant, flashlight, small tool kit, maps. I also found that my mesh jacket (with removable liner) was helpful crossing the desert. (an evaporative vest is also a great investment) Take time to enjoy the trip & the scenery!
Amen, Pastor Mike!
 

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*NRA*
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..dont rush, make a scenic trip out of it-- smell the coffee. A ride thru Montana's Big Horn valley is a daisy. I luv the smell of the Grand Tetons in the morning...
 

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2007 900 Classic
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Don't know if you are an ATGATT person or not and do not want to start a debate, but do not forget the sunscreen and chapstick. Hours in the sun and wind will take there toll on your body. You will need a way to stay hydrated. Be prepared for all weather in the spring, regardless of the route more southern the better for late spring. You may find yourself in heavy rain in one place and temps in the 40's somewhere else. Raingear, heavy and light gloves, long underwear, balacava. If you use a half helmet, bring clear eye protection for when it gets dark. Less cloths and more gear for the ride. Mail the rest of your cloths to your desination if yo have to.
 

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IBA#34418
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Rain Gear! Cold weather gear! If you don't have a windshield you may want to get one. Will make a big difference in fatigue. And what the others above have said too. Take your time and enjoy the trip. If you get tired stop for the day! Take lots o pics so we can share in your epic ride!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey, everyone thanks for the feedback! Lrdofh8, Did they require you to take anything off the bike before shipping (seat, batteries, etc.). Oh and about your bike... The baffles. Are those the sound suppressors in the end of the exhaust pipes? If so, did removing them make a BIG difference in the sound of the bike? Did it affect the performance of the machine at all?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Don't know if you are an ATGATT person or not and do not want to start a debate, but do not forget the sunscreen and chapstick. Hours in the sun and wind will take there toll on your body. You will need a way to stay hydrated. Be prepared for all weather in the spring, regardless of the route more southern the better for late spring. You may find yourself in heavy rain in one place and temps in the 40's somewhere else. Raingear, heavy and light gloves, long underwear, balacava. If you use a half helmet, bring clear eye protection for when it gets dark. Less cloths and more gear for the ride. Mail the rest of your cloths to your desination if yo have to.
Thanks for the feedback everyone! Hey idmtchris, i DEFINITELY don't want to start a debate either but what the heck does ATGATT stand for?...:neutral:
 

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staying hydrated is extremely important. Dunno if you will have a passenger on your bike, but I would recommend a Camelbak. Its a small lightweight backpack with a bladder in it you can put water in. and then has a hose you drink from. We used them in the military and I used them personally for hiking.

They have some that fit in huge backpacks or something real small that you could fit a camera and first aid kit into.

hydration-packs - CamelBak.com
 

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I would recomend a road atlas. GPS are nice but, they dont always know if the road is closed, blocked ,under construction etc. SO if you get somewhere and the road is closed say, you can flip open the altlas and look for an alternate route. I have a small one I got at Books a million. It will fit in like a shirt pocket. But it has basicly only the main roads like interstates and main highways. There is one just a bit larger but not as big as the "truckers" edition. The sort of medium sized one is about the size of a piece of paper so 8x11. What are you using for luggage? Make sure you can pack your gear in something to stay clean and dry. I use the vacume zip lock type "space bags". Put clothes in, seal up, roll bag and air is expelled and clothes are about 1/2 the size they were before. Saves space and makes them water proof to boot.
As far as hydration goes I like to stop about every couple hours anyways to get the blood circulating. I bought a cup holder from like Target in the automotive section. I forget what the heck they are called now but it is a material type cup holder and has a bendable wire sort of thing. It have it in the center of the handlebars and it sits on the front part of the risers. I'll get a water or coffee whatever and put in there. Last summer we rode in some really hot weather here in Fl, over 95. We stopped at a C-store and got a soda or something and it was in a styrofoam cup that fit great, so we kept them and when we stopped just asked how much to refill with whatever we wanted be it ice and water or a fountian drink etc. Most stores didnt care as long as you let them know ahead of time. Most of the time they have to charge by the cup you use from the store so they actually make money if you bring in your own. If they wont let you fill your cup then just fill thiers and transfer it outside to yours.
 

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2007 900 Classic
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2,517 Posts
I would recomend a road atlas. GPS are nice but, they dont always know if the road is closed, blocked ,under construction etc. SO if you get somewhere and the road is closed say, you can flip open the altlas and look for an alternate route. I have a small one I got at Books a million. It will fit in like a shirt pocket. But it has basicly only the main roads like interstates and main highways. There is one just a bit larger but not as big as the "truckers" edition. The sort of medium sized one is about the size of a piece of paper so 8x11. What are you using for luggage? Make sure you can pack your gear in something to stay clean and dry. I use the vacume zip lock type "space bags". Put clothes in, seal up, roll bag and air is expelled and clothes are about 1/2 the size they were before. Saves space and makes them water proof to boot.
As far as hydration goes I like to stop about every couple hours anyways to get the blood circulating. I bought a cup holder from like Target in the automotive section. I forget what the heck they are called now but it is a material type cup holder and has a bendable wire sort of thing. It have it in the center of the handlebars and it sits on the front part of the risers. I'll get a water or coffee whatever and put in there. Last summer we rode in some really hot weather here in Fl, over 95. We stopped at a C-store and got a soda or something and it was in a styrofoam cup that fit great, so we kept them and when we stopped just asked how much to refill with whatever we wanted be it ice and water or a fountian drink etc. Most stores didnt care as long as you let them know ahead of time. Most of the time they have to charge by the cup you use from the store so they actually make money if you bring in your own. If they wont let you fill your cup then just fill thiers and transfer it outside to yours.
My GPS has a detour button, which will find the way around a closed road. But certainly get get the latest road warnings before you head out each day regardless of Map or GPS choice.
 

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Strat Man ... ok, PRS too
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I have ridden from IL to the Pacific twice and to the mountains several times.

My advice is to get off the interstate as much as feasible - or totally. That is all.

Have a good trip.
 

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In addition to what others have said I'd like to add a couple of my thoughts. A set of crash bars with highway pegs so you can change riding position. A throttle lock so you can relax your hand. Waterproof gloves and boots. A buddy of mine is talking about riding the full length of Rt 66 this year and if I can figure a way to maintain peace at home I could be right behind ya! Enjoy the ride!
 

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The Bassman Rocketh
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In addition to what others have said I'd like to add a couple of my thoughts. A set of crash bars with highway pegs so you can change riding position. A throttle lock so you can relax your hand.
Those are two excellent suggestions! You can ride a lot further between breaks if you can change your leg position and rest your throttle hand. Those will make a big difference each morning, too, as position changes can help prevent stiffness.
 

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2007 900 Classic
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In addition to what others have said I'd like to add a couple of my thoughts. A set of crash bars with highway pegs so you can change riding position. A throttle lock so you can relax your hand. Waterproof gloves and boots. A buddy of mine is talking about riding the full length of Rt 66 this year and if I can figure a way to maintain peace at home I could be right behind ya! Enjoy the ride!
This is essential, if you cannot do the lock get a Throttle Rocker at minimum.
You can pick one up at almost any dealer for about 10 bucks.
 
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