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I have a 2000 diesel 2510 Mule that I bought new. It still less the 200 miles on it and it is stored inside. I'm the old fart that babies his toys. Essex cab and Warn wench.
Ever since the it was new there has been an occaisional 'pop' in the drive line. At first it seemed to occur a hundred feet or so after shifting from 4W to 2W. (I stop when shifting). It never occurs under a load but sometimes after a hard pull up a hill after the mule is back on the flat. It has done it in 4W and 2W.
4W shift cable is adjusted properly.
When I say occaisional pop I mean occaisional. Today we hauled wood about 1/2 mile in 2W and no pop. Sometimes it will pop 2 or 3 times in 100 yards and then not do it for several trips.
Thoughts as place to start?
Thanks
Chip
 

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The occasional pop is probably not anything to be concerned about. Follow the Owner Info link on Kawasaki.com to the parts diagrams.

Take a look at the diagram for the front driveshaft. You want to look at the two sets of friction clutches on each side of the differential carrier - look for the parts named plate-friction. They are limited slip clutches and will snap or pop when in four wheel drive and one wheel tries to go faster than another when on a firm surface, such as when you turn. They are designed to do just that, so no problem.

Then take a look at the diagram for the bevel gear case. There you will see a spring loaded dog, called Cam-damper, that is a strain relief device should the front wheels start going faster or slower than the rear wheels. That device loads up and snaps back into the spring and releases the torque before it can damage the transmission or the front differential.

I have actually seen guys that installed larger tires on the rear than on the front, and then that cam-damper (actually a damper cam) will snap like popcorn when in four wheel drive.

It is a good idea to keep your lubrication up to specifications with periodic changes, and the front differential clutches will generally remain quiet. The lube in these contains additives that oxidize over time, just like in a car, and should be changed periodically even if there is no substantial mileage on the rig. Sometimes it is even advantageous to use a limited slip additive in the front differential, just like used on a pickup truck, to stop the clutches from clattering.
 
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