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Discussion Starter #1
I changed my oil and did the marble trick in my 98 Vulcan 1500 Classic last month and now I am getting oil in the RH Air Box? Before I used regular oil with no problems. This time I used Kawasaki KawaChem premium motorcycle oil. I put in 2.6 qts. and ran the bike and topped it of with another 0.2 qts till it was at the half level in the oil indicator. I checked the level again and it is still at the half way point.

I pulled the plugs and they read o.k. There is no smoke out the exhaust and the bike runs fine.

Anybody have any ideas?

Thanks,

Grunt
 

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It's no big deal at all. In fact it's even a little bit of a benefit.
If you want to reduce the amount of oil that is drawn into your airbox through your crankcase breather, just keep not overfilling your crankcase and give your oil a chance to warm up every morning before getting on the gas. When the crankcase oil is colder and thicker, it is more likely to get sucked into that vent tube leading to your airbox.

And there is indeed a benefit. So a little bit of oil gets drawn into your airbox: As long as it's not excessive, here is another layer of sticky stuff to help your air filter element catch airborn particles in your airbox to prevent them from entering your carbs & chambers. And this layer gets refreshed everytime a little more oil is drawn in from the crankcase. In fact, whenever I clean the air filter on any of my bikes, I like to spray a thin layer of air-filter oil all over the inside surface of the airbox for this very reason. Every insect wing and bit of dust that you have to clean out of your airbox was successfully kept from entering your engine, right?

When I figured out what the drain-tube in my airbox was for, I replaced the drain hose leading out of it with clear hose and plugged it off. This way I can see how much oil is getting into the airbox, I know when to drain it, and I know if I've put too much oil in the crankcase.

Good luck.
-CCinC

P.S. Don't make the mistake I've seen some riders do. They'll simply plug up the crankcase breather, thinking that it's only an EPA-mandated measure. But exerting a slight vaccuum on crankcases is done by auto racing mechs, and plugging up that breather (especially on a V-twin) is a sure way to shorten ring life.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Calamarichris

Thanks for the reply. Glad to hear it's no big deal. Now that you mentioned it, it started when the weather got colder. This is the first water-cooled bike I had and it takes a long time (+5 minutes) to warm up.
 

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I hope you're not letting it idle that long, Grunt. No matter how cold it is, I wouldn't let it idle any longer than it takes to put on a helmet and a pair of gloves. Just fire it up and ride gently away. I usually go to half choke before snicking into first, then turn the choke off completely after reaching 3000rpm the second time.
Here's an article about engine break-in and warming up by an old smart guy who was a favorite of mine until he passed away:
http://www.chrisandlisachan.com/break-in-game.htm

Ride safe!
-CCinC
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just bought the bike this summer. It's a 98 Vulcan 1500 Classic with 6,000 miles. The previous owner put on a new windshield, saddle bags, all the chrome and Cobra pipes. The bike runs fine, but it takes about 5 minutes warmup before I can crack the throttle without it dying out. I have checked the temp by feeling the heads and they do not get real warm during the warmup. After a long ride when I pull in the garage the fan comes on. I took it to a Kawasaki dealer and they said this was normal?

I think the bike was not jetted or the jet size put in was too small. I was going to jet it myself, but while looking for jet kits found another Kawasaki dealer. They will sell me the Dyno-Jet kit for $58 and install it for $92. They also have a Dyno-Jet Dyno, so I get a free Dyno run. Will post results next week.

Here's a link to another beak-in procedure. I think I like yours better. http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 

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Hmmm...motoman's break-in "tips" are all very interesting but I would (and have) followed the OEM recommendations. I think they have a bit more experience in the R&D department. AND, my personal experience with cars and bikes from the 50s to my present 1500 Classic is that I "take it easy" per the manual during break-in and use the recommended lubes. I do change oil and filter more frequently than the service manual recommends cause it don't hurt. 22K on my Vulcan and at 3000 miles (my change interval) the oil is exactly where I put it at the previous oil change. Ridin' in the east TN mountains two-up puts some strain on her and the soft break-in obviously has not been detrimental.

T-man
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I agree T-man . Now with cnc machining, better materials and vast superior oil I thought you could get away with it from an engine standpoint. I worked on a lot 50's engines where you had to do a valve job at 20,000 and replace rings and bearings at 40-60,000 miles. Add a qt. of oil every two or three tankfulls. Glad, those days are gone.

I am looking for a high performance engine for my Camaro. Talked to a couple of good engine builders. They all said to break it in by not going over 3,000 rpm for the first 500 miles.

Or, you can use the old racers theory, "If You Ain't Breaking, You Ain't Racing".
 
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