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Discussion Starter #1
hi I was curious to see what others opinion is on this as a do it yourself job. I am sure I can remove most parts but the tank kinda scares me a bit. For those who have painted did you remove the tank and if so how hard was it? Could I just leave the tank on and tape around it?

Also how would you rate the finish of it afterwards? I have some scratches that would have to be sanded on the lower bit of fairing.. Can I still get a nice showroom type shine with a spray paint job?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
also if there is anyone or a website that can tell me very specificly how to remove all the body parts off my bike so I can paint it.

How many coats of pain/clearcoat would you guys suggest? Whats kinda things should I be careful of besides the obvious spray paint running.

I am thinking of going a high gloss black. When painting the tank seeing how it is metal do I have to buy new paint or will it have to be sanded? I never really spray painted something of this size before and I don't want to ruin the look of my bike.

If there are any good sites or some good info you guys can advise I am more then willing to read it. THX IN ADVANCED!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
when sanding I must take all of the old paint off before applying the new paint??
 

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Painting your bike.

I highly recommend using an automotive grade single stage paint (no clear coat involved) since this is your first time painting something like this. You could pick up a spray gun at Lowes or Home Depot for under $50. Granted it wont be a very good paint gun, but it will be better than using spray paint. Spray paint on body panels is very hard to achieve a glossy look, even with a clear coat applied. Spray paint is not intended to be clear-coated like an automotive base coat. Plus, spray paint does harden like automotive grade paint so you may end up with chips in your front fairing.

If you do decide to use spray paint, first clean the plastic and tank with a soap that will remove any grease or wax. Second, I recommend sanding all of the plastic and the tank with 180-220 grit sand paper (use wet paper it will last longer). After that apply a self-etching primer (2 or 3 coats). After that dries, sand it all again with 320 – 400 grit sand paper. Next, clean the surface with some type of prepping agent (something that will evaporate after it has been wiped on like 3812, your local automotive paint store will know what that is). Next, use a tack-rag then apply your color. Use smooth, even strokes and keep the spray can an even distance from the surface (about 8 – 10 inches). The hard thing about spray paint is all of the over spray that is generated. Do a light tack coat first, then a first wet coat. After that has dried for about 30 minutes – hour apply a second wet coat. Remember to keep the spray can or gun moving.

If you are going to apply a clear coat to the spray paint you should let the color completely dry. When it is completely dry, sand the color with a very fine grit sand paper (600 - 1000 grit). Try very hard not to damage the color. Then apply your clear coats. Budget paint job 101.
 

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Re: Painting your bike.

AlaskaNinja said:
Plus, spray paint does harden like automotive grade paint so you may end up with chips in your front fairing.
That should be, spray paint does not harden like automotive grade paint.
 

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I did a spraypaint job and it looked awsome (Orange pearl). One day i took the cover off and a good amount of clear coat. I had to have it professionaly done after that (hot lime). I took the parts in to save some money. If its a brand new bike, have it profesionnaly done. Learn from other's mistakes....its a hell of a lot cheaper. Whatever you do, do not use any paint stripper on the plastic parts...see my posting "dont always trust professionals" under lessons learned.
 

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Re: Painting your bike.

AlaskaNinja said:
I highly recommend using an automotive grade single stage paint (no clear coat involved) since this is your first time painting something like this. You could pick up a spray gun at Lowes or Home Depot for under $50. Granted it wont be a very good paint gun, but it will be better than using spray paint. Spray paint on body panels is very hard to achieve a glossy look, even with a clear coat applied. Spray paint is not intended to be clear-coated like an automotive base coat. Plus, spray paint does harden like automotive grade paint so you may end up with chips in your front fairing.

If you do decide to use spray paint, first clean the plastic and tank with a soap that will remove any grease or wax. Second, I recommend sanding all of the plastic and the tank with 180-220 grit sand paper (use wet paper it will last longer). After that apply a self-etching primer (2 or 3 coats). After that dries, sand it all again with 320 – 400 grit sand paper. Next, clean the surface with some type of prepping agent (something that will evaporate after it has been wiped on like 3812, your local automotive paint store will know what that is). Next, use a tack-rag then apply your color. Use smooth, even strokes and keep the spray can an even distance from the surface (about 8 – 10 inches). The hard thing about spray paint is all of the over spray that is generated. Do a light tack coat first, then a first wet coat. After that has dried for about 30 minutes – hour apply a second wet coat. Remember to keep the spray can or gun moving.

If you are going to apply a clear coat to the spray paint you should let the color completely dry. When it is completely dry, sand the color with a very fine grit sand paper (600 - 1000 grit). Try very hard not to damage the color. Then apply your clear coats. Budget paint job 101.
Good post :D This guy knows a little about painting. I would only add that self etching primer is not intended for build up. It is mainly used on bare metal. Bare plastic should be treated with plastic adhesion promoter and then a filling primer. I would use finer paper for sanding if you are not going to spray a sealer before spraying. I would use 500-600 wet. I also use flexing agent in all of my primers, single stage and clear coat applications. Good luck
 

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ok ill let you in on some tips cuz i jsut did it on my bike.. First i use Krylon paint or least close to that name.. it has the plastic bonding stuff. First some tips i should of done but didnt listen.. First if its anywhat bit Humid DONT EVEN PAIT.. my paint is still sticky and its been painted for about a month.. next i say use a primer i didnt .. but wish i did would of been smother.. I havent painted the tank cuz well i much rather ride the bike then let it sit.. But even though its a crappy job alot of people are surprised when i tell them i painted it.. so spray paint does work.. but ill say it again.. if its even 10% humide dont paint wait till its not humide at all..
 

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Paint

If you take the parts in to a paint shop it will be cheaper, and you should get some guarantee. Taking off the tank is not a problem on most bikes, but if you are afraid of putting it back on and scratching it then let the shop do it. Some of the Motorcycle Salvage yards, have real paint booths and they work with all sorts of plastics, fiberglass...and know how to do the job right...they are fairly inexpensive most of the time.
 
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