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Discussion Starter #1
Is it ok to part a bike outside even when raining? I know in general it always better to part inside. And that rain and the elements can take a tole on paint But unfortunately my apartment has not more spaces available inside. I will be riding the bike 3-4 days a week. Its not a new bike it’s a 1995, and I am not worried about the cosmetics of it realy.
So what the verdict? I know inside is better but I don’t have a choice for right now, will it be ok if a rain storm hits ect..
 

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I've parked mine outside since it was new. Try and cover it when it's going to be sitting for too long. I recently moved to an apartment. I park the bike cross ways in front of my truck, in the car port. Easier to do because I'm next to a handicaped spot. It mostly protects it, I cover if it's going to sit for a day or more.
 

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Just keep it waxed, once or twice a year is all I would do.

I had a Shadow 500 that never saw a garage. It stayed
outside uncovered for about 3 years. I waxed it once
or twice a year and it never had a spot of rust. The seat
held up as well. I had a Shadow 750 that was kept outside
for about a year with no problems. I did keep it under a
very nice ($$$) cover. I had about 40,000+ miles
on both of those bikes...they had no rust or problems when I sold them.

My current bike is a 1600 Classic and it stays outside under a nice cover for weeks at a time. When I travel
I keep it in a garage but most of the time it is outside.
But I do clean it about ever other week or so.
It has a little over 4000 miles on it and I have had no problems with it.

I have always lived in high humidity areas and I lived
at the beach (salt) for a while...never had a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ok this is good news for me.

Here is another question....What keep sombody from just rolling away you.my bike?

On my friends F4i he has a wheel lok that came on the bike, so the wheel cant be turned.

My bike has some part on the ignotion that says "lock" but when i turn it to that..i can get the key? am i missing another nub thing?
 

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Depending On The Bike , The Lock Pos. Is Used At Full Right Or Left Handle Bar Position.the Key Should Be Able To Be Removed And Stay Locked.you Should Also Back Up The Lock With A Disc Lock.just Remember To Remove Before Going Anywhere.good Luck And Use Some Protectant On The Rubber Parts To Help Against Dry Rot
 

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Patriot Guard Rider
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If you REALLY want to keep your bike lock it down to something stationary.

Two or three guys can still pick up your bike with a disc or fork lock and slide it in the back of a truck....easily.
 

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I keep my bike outside since I don't have a garage. Here's what I do:

- I use a cover. It's just a cheap one from Walmart. It works fine. It keeps the bulk of the rain off and keeps the bike out of view.
- I use the fork lock (turn the key to the lock position before removing it).
- I connect a U-Lock to the front fork and frame to help prevent someone breaking the fork lock.
- A connect a cable lock between a tree I park next to and run it through the U-lock and around the front fork. The exhaust prevents running the cable through the frame, so I use the U-Lock as an anchor.

Here's what the setup (minus the cover) looks like:

 

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well if theyre determined theyl get that cable cut in about .5 seconds with some bolt cutters but it keeps the general dumba$$ thief away which is all you really can do short of lojack which only gets it back after the fact
 

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IMO, insurance is the best theft protection. They
will get it if they want it bad enough.

A guy near me has a Highhawk just like that.
 

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Your bike will be fine outside in the rain. Although it will require a little preventative maintenance on your part from time to time. You just have to check switches and electrical connections for corrosion from time to time and take care of it as soon as you see any otherwise it can cause difficulties in the future. Things like ignition switches, fork locks ect.. may need lubed a little more often and checked for corrosion build up, but other than that if you just keep it cleaned up, it'll be fine. You may notice surface rust on the chrome start to come up from time to time, it can be removed easily and quickly and without damage to the chrome, just keep an eye on it.

My bikes are outside bikes but they are ridden every day to work and back at a minimum. So I basically give it a quick once over every day, just looking for any rust or corrosion. I often spot some very small surface rust spots on the chrome that typically show up on my the triple tree and exhaust but I eliminate them in 2 seconds with #0000 very fine steel wool. Usually one swipe does it.
 

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Poser Proud®
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I ride my 900 rain or shine. At home it is covered, but at work it will sit outside for 10-12 hours while I work. I usually wipe it off when I get home. Wax it once in a while, and use detail spray now and again to keep it clean.

Water won't hurt it at all. I always lock the fork lock, but I have an alarm also.
 

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Alien Test Subject
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Before we bought the house, my bikes were always parked outside.

Best advice I can give you is to get a cover for it. Yes, it keeps the weather off of it, but more importantly, it makes the bike more discrete to the casual observer. Out of sight, out of mind - so to speak.

A covered bike blends into the background a bit more than seeing a shiny, eye catching toy. Only ever had problems with mine when I forgot to conceal them. It won't keep a thief away if he's determined to get your bike, but it will keep away random vandals and kids who think it's a piece of playground equipment. I can't tell you how many times I'd pull up in my car, and see one of the local 6-year olds sitting on it making vroom noises. Or I'd get up for a Sunday morning ride to find some idiot 'tagged' his name on the fairing. Then there was the time some drunken teenager (I'm assuming) slashed my seat, and kicked the bike over -man was I POed. But all this only happened on the few occasions that I forgot to cover the bike.

As I said, out of sight, out of mind.
 

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If you do park your bike outside, make a habit of doing a quick check of things that often get tampered with before you start up the bike: spark plugs, oil drain plug, shifter, battery connections and starter kill switch.

There are several cheap or free things you can do (aside from buying a cover) to increase your chances the bike will stay put:

If you're really worried, do a few simple things to make the bike look more unappealing, like remove the seat and side covers (on a crusier). Just be sure to put a towel over the open seat area - and use a cover - to keep crud out of the air system.

Disable the bike from being easily started by getting a quick disconnect for the battery or pull the main electrical connector. For that matter, make use of the starter kill switch - a lot of people honestly get tripped up by that one.

If you have soft saddle bags and keep them on the bike, zip them up and latch the retaining straps, but don't put locks on them. If they're locked, it might tempt someone to cut them open to see what you're trying to secure. Just don't keep anything important in them. Otherwise, take them indoors.

Don't buy a cover with the brand name of your bike splashed across it. Plain Jane is the way to go here. Don't show pride in your ride when the idea is to conceal it.
 
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