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99%er
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Discussion Starter #1
I was sitting around thinking of a way i could show my respect for our fallen soldier's. So i joined the Patriot Gaurd today. My questions are who on here has joined and what are the rides like? What am i to expect when on a "mission"?
Thanks in advance.
 

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Workin' to ride
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559 Posts
I was sitting around thinking of a way i could show my respect for our fallen soldier's. So i joined the Patriot Gaurd today. My questions are who on here has joined and what are the rides like? What am i to expect when on a "mission"?
Thanks in advance.
-Jay
Good for you Jay. Sorry I don't have any info for you...
 

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Guilty By Association
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650 Posts
Search this forum for patriot guard....i know there are at least three threads about them in here
 

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Registered
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55 Posts
IME, There really is not much to it. They EMail you with the times, locations and special instructions for the ride and you show up and do it. I don't know what, if anything happens at the state level. I am in the military and have done rides in (1) Texas and (2) in Kansas. Everyone seems real nice.
 

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Strat Man ... ok, PRS too
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582 Posts
Just got back into riding this July and haven't done a ride yet. I have talked with my state captain and am committed to this year if needed.

He told me we will usually hang back, ride as a group, then hang back again at the service. Every ride is different because our ONLY mission will be to serve the family's wishes.

Each ride I do this summer will be with my sons. After they each go, we'll see who wants to keep it up with me.......

Of course, the best case is not of us ever has to do another ride.
 

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Recycled Rider
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583 Posts
I'm a National Guard Chaplain, so instead of on my bike, I'm always in the hearse or car in front of it.
But from my experience, they ride in the procession, along with 40-50 law enforcement and fire dept vehicles, from the funeral home to where the funeral or memorial is to be (usually a school gym). Then they man two members at each door, often mixed in with Fallen Eagle ridders or other similar groups and usually 10 or more at the main entrance. If the burial is immeadiately after the service, they will ride to the cemetary and kind of form a line enough distance away to discourage trouble makers from getting too close to the grave side ceremony.

That's my experience. Undoubtedly it varies. Don't know what they do around military installations.

But as a military member, I can't say enough praise for what they do. There were a few times when overseas and reminicing about some of our hairy missions that someone brought up how people support the families of our fallen service members. Those were the first times I heard about the PG.
So, I guess you could say it helps us have courage in what we do; knowing the honor they show and knowing people will care for our families.
 

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900 Custom 07
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81 Posts
Search Patriot Guard on youtube you'll get a visual. After registering missions will be e-mailed to you by the State Captain.
Riding With Respect
 

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Wannabe Poser
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3,446 Posts
Just curious but how often is there really trouble at the services for our fallen soldiers? I'm sure it's happens sometime but I've never really heard about it.
 

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Ed Scott - Old-Time Biker
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1,183 Posts
Hello Jay... congrats on your intentions.

I've been a PGR member for quite some time now with dozens of missions, even though I have to ride 100 miles each way to attend. I'm sure being in Jersey, you've got things happening right around you so it shouldn't be that difficult to make the missions.

Go to the PGR site for all the details and missions across the country. you can join PGR there, then search around the site for your own local chapter and email the leadership of your joining. They'll put you on their mailing list.

Each mission is different, as said above, because the guard plans it around the schedule and desires of the family involved. An average mission will ask you to show up at a meeting place about half an hour before they are due at the church, airport, military base, etc. so that new people can be recognized and everyone gets briefed on how the mission will go down... and a safety briefing and often a prayer and some information about the deceased.

The group then mounts up and rides together to the church or funeral home and sets up a flag line at the entrance. They then take a break until time for the funeral to exit, and then they form a flag line again. Then they mount up and accompany the hearse to the burial site and then form a flag line, participating in the military portion of the funeral... saluting and honoring the fallen hero.

Often after the ceremonies members of the family or the military or the police come up and shake the PGR members hands and thank them... and each of them says "It's my distinct privilege sir, to honor this hero... no thanks is needed." Or something similar, or often just a nod and a smile.

As you will see in the over 500 videos on youtube, it's very hard to keep your eyes dry at one of these missions.

The Patriot Guard riders also have sendoffs for large groups leaving, welcome homes, charity rides and they stick together when one of their members crashes or falls ill. They'll keep your hospital room busy visiting you.

Each district and each group is different because they all have different leadership. Some do very few funerals because they don't get the word out to the media about what they do. Some don't do sendoffs or welcome homes for one reason or another.

The overwhelming sentiment in any group is that whatever hardships the members go through, it's nothing compared to the sacrifice of the fallen hero... no mission is for the members, it's entirely for the hero and his/her family.

Oh and Seadog, Though I've never seen a single protester at the missions, the Westboro Baptist Church is still active in their apparently misguided abuse of people who allow homosexuality to exist... I've never understood how they equate this with military funerals. There's some about that on youtube as well.

Good luck and God bless your endeavors.

 

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Patriot Guard Rider
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967 Posts
I think HoopleHead explained it pretty well. Pretty much do whatever the families request. We set up flag lines at the funeral home when the wake or viewing takes place and also at the funeral itself. Each mission is unique but the main reason we're there is to show respect to the fallen soldier and their family. Thankfully, I've never encountered any protesters here in N.C. and hope I never do. Thanks for joining up....it's time well spent and the families really appreciate the show of support. It's the least we can do.

Charles
 

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99%er
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239 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the feedback guys! I am toataly dedicated to this and hope their actually isn't much need for the PGR this year. Not that i don't want to perform the mission, but then that would mean no casualties.
I have a cousin that took a bullet to the head a few years ago in iraq. Luckily it just grazed him, but it could of been worse. this is the least i can do IMO.

Hello Jay... congrats on your intentions.

I've been a PGR member for quite some time now with dozens of missions, even though I have to ride 100 miles each way to attend. I'm sure being in Jersey, you've got things happening right around you so it shouldn't be that difficult to make the missions.

Go to the PGR site for all the details and missions across the country. you can join PGR there, then search around the site for your own local chapter and email the leadership of your joining. They'll put you on their mailing list.

Each mission is different, as said above, because the guard plans it around the schedule and desires of the family involved. An average mission will ask you to show up at a meeting place about half an hour before they are due at the church, airport, military base, etc. so that new people can be recognized and everyone gets briefed on how the mission will go down... and a safety briefing and often a prayer and some information about the deceased.

The group then mounts up and rides together to the church or funeral home and sets up a flag line at the entrance. They then take a break until time for the funeral to exit, and then they form a flag line again. Then they mount up and accompany the hearse to the burial site and then form a flag line, participating in the military portion of the funeral... saluting and honoring the fallen hero.

Often after the ceremonies members of the family or the military or the police come up and shake the PGR members hands and thank them... and each of them says "It's my distinct privilege sir, to honor this hero... no thanks is needed." Or something similar, or often just a nod and a smile.

As you will see in the over 500 videos on youtube, it's very hard to keep your eyes dry at one of these missions.

The Patriot Guard riders also have sendoffs for large groups leaving, welcome homes, charity rides and they stick together when one of their members crashes or falls ill. They'll keep your hospital room busy visiting you.

Each district and each group is different because they all have different leadership. Some do very few funerals because they don't get the word out to the media about what they do. Some don't do sendoffs or welcome homes for one reason or another.

The overwhelming sentiment in any group is that whatever hardships the members go through, it's nothing compared to the sacrifice of the fallen hero... no mission is for the members, it's entirely for the hero and his/her family.

Oh and Seadog, Though I've never seen a single protester at the missions, the Westboro Baptist Church is still active in their apparently misguided abuse of people who allow homosexuality to exist... I've never understood how they equate this with military funerals. There's some about that on youtube as well.

Good luck and God bless your endeavors.
This might sound like a stupid question, but is it mandatory to have the flag in the back on a mission?
 

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Ed Scott - Old-Time Biker
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1,183 Posts
Not at all, Jay. There are usually a few riders that have "big flags" and they are usually put at the front of the procession, but most riders have small flags or none at all. The PGR doesn't try to make any members feel special or any feel small... it's about the hero, not the PGR.
 
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