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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, could someone help me please.

I just experienced a new problem to me this week (my headlights died and no dash indicator as-well) but everything remains functional. I've spend hours fixing it myself to gain some experience and knowledge. I've done it by following some of the threads here and other sources to see if any of the solution would apply to me. After spending 2days testing and checking wiring and connectors, got it working by replacing the Relay Box (the one under the seat) with a brand new one. I then spent the whole day (yesterday) riding without any issue. But today my problem have returned and I'm so lost to what have caused it to come back. Could I possible broke my new Relay Box? Is that possible? What Would cause it to Break?
Any help would be appreciated,
Thank you
 

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1983 GPz 750, green
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What model bike is it? Can you post some pictures of the relay box? You've checked all the wire connectors, fuses, switches too?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What model bike is it? Can you post some pictures of the relay box? You've checked all the wire connectors, fuses, switches too?
It's an 04 Zx10R
Yes, I have checked and cleaned them again like I did when I first had the problem and everything seems to be ok (I don't have a multi meter, so I can't check if their power on the headlight switch. But other function like running lights, signal lights etc. remains functional so their must be power on the line, right?)
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I replaced the Relay Junction Box under the seat (Relay-Assy Part no. 27002-0050) it's the one on top of the ECU.

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I wonder if it's Relay Switch that needs replacement, The one on the front left side Fairings. However I do remember this is for signal lights? or am i wrong?
 

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I have a suggestion. Rather than spend money replacing parts, you could invest in a multimeter or test light to do some basic troubleshooting first. A common mistake with electrics is to replace a blown component without first understanding why it blew. If the root cause of failure is not determined, then the new component will blow just like the first one.

You will also need a wiring diagram and I would suggest you obtain a service manual. The cost of a multimeter and service manual is probably less than the cost of one hour of labour at your Kawasaki dealer. Consider it money well spent.
 

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Totally agree with WFO-KZ. Also keep in mind the money spent is an investment in in the future as well. You can use the multi meter on all your vehicles and even home repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I have a suggestion. Rather than spend money replacing parts, you could invest in a multimeter or test light to do some basic troubleshooting first. A common mistake with electrics is to replace a blown component without first understanding why it blew. If the root cause of failure is not determined, then the new component will blow just like the first one.

You will also need a wiring diagram and I would suggest you obtain a service manual. The cost of a multimeter and service manual is probably less than the cost of one hour of labour at your Kawasaki dealer. Consider it money well spent.
I do have a very cheap Test Light that I used to find the lost in power on the first place, but I think it's time for me to get a multimeter to find the short/drop in power. However I don't really know how to use one, could you give me some tips on how to use one? I could youtube it I suppose.
Sorry I'm an amateur mechanic and don't know how to use a multimeter properly. Is their such a thing as wire break/cut detector? that detects wire breaks? I find it tedious undoing electric tapes just to follow the wire, then adding new electric tapes.
Could you also recommend me a multimeter brand?
Yeah I have a manual and was following the wiring diagram.
 

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Okay Young_Kid, you are going to get a lot of help. A multi-meter is probably the best tool you could ever have, next to a set of metric sockets and a brain in your head. They (multimeters) measure things like AC/DC volts, amperes, ohms, conductivity, and similarly continuity. Look all those words up in your favorite web browser. A reasonably good multi-meter should not cost you more than $30 to $40 bucks. But its no use unless you know what the words actually mean. Then you need a basic understanding of ELECTRICITY. Read all you can about DC voltage/current first. Ohms Law. Don't be afraid!!!!! You will understand with our help. This is on-line learning, better than school and you have the bike right in front of you. BTW, yes the multi-meter can detect cuts/breaks/poor connections. Magic.
 

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For detecting a break in a wire, you disconnect the plugs at both ends. Set the mulitmeter to check for continuity with audio alert so you can hear the meter make a continuous beep if it finds a good connection between any two measured points. Put one of the multimeter leads on the suspect wire at one end and then put the other lead on the other end.
If you don't get a beep, or even if you do get a beep, wiggle the harness the whole way along to see if you can make or break the connection. This is easier with two people.

If the connection within the harness is intermittent or non-existent, then it is time to unwrap the tape if you are sure the fault is not at the connectors themselves. You can buy or build a tool for releasing individual terminals from within their plastic connector housings. This allows you to inspect, clean or replace the terminals themselves although to replace them you will need a special crimping tool.

Hint: for re-wrapping the harness, you should use harness tape, not ordinary electrical tape.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hello Guys, I just finished dancing with Covid but now I'm back.
So I did some multimeter test today (I don't really fully understand the results)
However I tested my headlights sockets and here's what I got. My multimeter has auto selections on voltage, It picked DC and here's my results.
* Ignition Key On
- Low Beam sockets around 120
- once High Beam switched on, it drops to 99
- High Beam sockets around 64
- once switch on, it raise to 98
I tried to bypass the Left Switch Housing for the Headlights by directly connecting them together and my lights still wont power on. At this point I'm convinced that I just burned my brand new relay box. Is it possible to break a brand new Relay Box? what would cause my new Relay Box to break?

What other test can I do? Also, how can I test the relay box if it still works?
 

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Something very wrong with the readings you are getting! Are you perhaps missing a decimal point? Its a 12 volt battery. Set your multimeter to DC with upper range 20 Volts DC. Then get back with results. Remember the RED wire will be POSITIVE, BLACK is NEGATIVE. Test the battery first you should read somewhere around 10 to 13 volts DC. Post a pic of the multimeter too.
 

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I am thinking at this point it would be a really good idea to have your battery load tested.

A voltage check or a battery charger that says your battery is fully charged is NOT proof that a battery is good. Only a load test or measuring the specific gravity of the electrolyte in each cell can ascertain the health of a battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok I just tested the motorcycle battery and I'm getting 12.9 volts. I also tested a AA Battery and 1.6 volts which are very normal reading, which mean my multimeter is not broken (right?). However once I connect the multimeter to the headlights sockets I'm getting those really high numbers. Maybe I should start tracking at which point in the connector does the voltage change.

Did I got a wrong type of multimeter? This is what I'm using.

I recently got a brand new battery (4months old) when I bought the bike the old batter was not holding charge.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Something very wrong with the readings you are getting! Are you perhaps missing a decimal point? Its a 12 volt battery. Set your multimeter to DC with upper range 20 Volts DC. Then get back with results. Remember the RED wire will be POSITIVE, BLACK is NEGATIVE. Test the battery first you should read somewhere around 10 to 13 volts DC. Post a pic of the multimeter too.
The Multimeter I got don't have voltage range selection, it has an auto range selection if that makes sense. I posted the link to what multimeter I got bellow.
 

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The fact that your battery is 4 months old does not mean it is good. A battery load test is free at most places that sell batteries.

But lets focus on your multimeter for the moment.
When you set it to measure voltage, somewhere on the display it should say AC or DC. Make sure that when you measure the headlight voltage it says DC. If it does not, hitting the function key once should toggle it back to DC.
If you still get three digit numbers (with no decimal place shown) then look at the display to see if it is measuring in something less than full volts (IE millivolts)

Try measuring headlight voltage again and look for a decimal point or millivolt display. If it still reads high, leave the multimeter on, don't touch any of its buttons and then move to the battery to see if you get a normal result.
 

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Also which two of the three jack ports on the multimeter do you plug your test leads into?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The fact that your battery is 4 months old does not mean it is good. A battery load test is free at most places that sell batteries.

But lets focus on your multimeter for the moment.
When you set it to measure voltage, somewhere on the display it should say AC or DC. Make sure that when you measure the headlight voltage it says DC. If it does not, hitting the function key once should toggle it back to DC.
If you still get three digit numbers (with no decimal place shown) then look at the display to see if it is measuring in something less than full volts (IE millivolts)

Try measuring headlight voltage again and look for a decimal point or millivolt display. If it still reads high, leave the multimeter on, don't touch any of its buttons and then move to the battery to see if you get a normal result.
Yeah, you're right. I'm reading millivolts on my headlight sockets. I took the bike for a good day ride yesterday and the millivolts was up too 200-250 (about 0.25 volts).
I haven't determined at which point my voltage change from 12.9 volts (battery). I would need to take apart my bikes fairings to check at which point my voltage drops.
I will make an update once I determined at which point my voltage drops.
 

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Well there are other things you can do without stripping the fairings and removing the gas tank. For instance you can take apart the handlebar housing and test the voltage at the headlight switch. You can also see if one of the relays in the relay box is for your headlight and test it.

Can we assume that when you are checking for headlight voltage you are doing so with the bulb removed?
 

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I need to jump in here Guys.
That Battery you linked is the wrong one, It's only a 12v 6ah your Bike needs to be fitted with a 12v 10ah, I've posted a picture of the correct one.
So first things first you need the correct Battery.

 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I need to jump in here Guys.
That Battery you linked is the wrong one, It's only a 12v 6ah your Bike needs to be fitted with a 12v 10ah, I've posted a picture of the correct one.
So first things first you need the correct Battery.

Ohh really? Could you please explain to me the difference? What effects does it have on my bike? Is it bad for my bike to have the 12v 6ah battery?
Thank you in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well there are other things you can do without stripping the fairings and removing the gas tank. For instance you can take apart the handlebar housing and test the voltage at the headlight switch. You can also see if one of the relays in the relay box is for your headlight and test it.

Can we assume that when you are checking for headlight voltage you are doing so with the bulb removed?
So I just spend an hour today poking around the wire connections from battery to headlights and this is what I learned.
The 12.5 volts from the battery goes to the fuse box ok dropping to about 12 volts. Now once the voltage goes to the Relay Box, the voltages drops to a 7.8. Checking the Light Switch housing it drops even more to a 6.9 volts. I then continue to the headlights and the voltage drops a little bit again to about a 4 volts.
To answer your question 'Can we assume that when you are checking for headlight voltage you are doing so with the bulb removed?' Yes, I did because I don't know how to test it otherwise without poking the wire itselft?.
So.. Is there any test I still need to do?
What else can i do?
 
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