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Your voltage drops are likely due to corrosion. Have you tried cleaning all the contacts and connections along the way to the headlight?
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
I have cleaned them as best as i can and still nothing. I cannot get more voltage to pass through my relay box. Only 7.1 volts can pass through the relay box.
Is it possible to bypass the relay box? Im wondering if, I can connect my grey wire (from my 10a fuse) straight to my headlight wiring (blue/yellow wire). Just to see if the problem is with my relay box?

Update:
So after debating with myself if it's safe to do so. I bypass the relay box with a short wire and boom my headlights works (low beam and high beam).
So does that confirm that my relay box is faulty?

What would cause a brand new relay box too fail? The relay box was only on my bike for 24hrs before I lost my headlights again.
Is it possible that me leaving the high beam switched on would result on the relay box too fail?
 

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Ok, so I see that with your relay box, the relays cannot be replaced. How stupid is that? Look at the diagram below and then clean all of the connections involved.

It is hard to clean the connections, but with patience, some fine emery cloth and with small tools wrapped in emery cloth you can get the job done. You have to make them shine. I would then clean them with compressed air and/or electrical contact cleaner. I prefer to finish the job with a spray of DeOxit.

If this does not work, then it would appear that the voltage drop is coming from corroded or burned contacts within the relay itself, which means buying a new box. But since this was already a new box it begs the question, why two failures in a row? Has anything been added to the headlight circuit that would put extra demand on the relay? Has someone swapped to a higher wattage headlight bulb?

42262
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Tell me about it, It's in a sealed plastic box that's been plastic glued together. So opening it would be impossible unless I saw the box open.
Yup, I've done that with a fine sandpaper and electric contract cleaner and nothing seems to be working. They have the same headlights as when I received the Bike. The only modification I've done to the Bike when I got it was adding a GPS tracker.
Looking at the wiring diagram for my bike. The only wire that I would consider to have cause it to burn would be the black wire, it shares a connection with the headlight relay, it's coming from the 'Regulator / Rectifier'.
What else would caused it to burn?
 

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If you did not buy the bike new, I would compare the headlight wattage with the OEM spec. If you like I can provide you with some resistance checks for the relay itself. Also the internal diodes can be checked as well. Where did you wire in the GPS?
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
That would be perfect. Could you also tell me how to check the relay resistance, as I have no clue how to do it.
I have no idea where the GPS was connected it was done by the BikeTrac Mechanic/Installer, I bought the Bike to there shop and I waited in the Lobby.

Also is it SAFE for me to keep bypassing the headlight relay? Just to have momentary headlights? Could I possible damage something by doing it?
 

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How long ago was the GPS installed? The mechanic may remember and advise you of the circuit he tied into. I would assume your bike has an accessory circuit that he used. In that case it should be fine. Also the amperage draw of your GPS is likely quite low and might not be an issue even if it was tied into the headlight circuit. In any case, it would be good for you to know which circuit he used in case you have any future wiring problems.

As a general rule it is not safe to bypass a relay. The purpose of the relay is to allow very small wires to be used for control of the circuit, right up to the relay. The relay will then use heavier wires to send current to the actual load which in this case is your headlight. If you are certain that your bypass setup is only on the heavier wires then it should be ok, but in that case you won't have any way to use the handlebar switches to turn the headlights on or off. The final caveat is that without studying the wiring diagram, I cannot say for certain if a bypass can be done safely.
 

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Please note, that you must remove the box for these tests. These tests cover all of the relays within the box. Since your headlight relay is tied to the starter relay you may wish to test both.

42273
42274
 

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Discussion Starter #31
How long ago was the GPS installed? The mechanic may remember and advise you of the circuit he tied into. I would assume your bike has an accessory circuit that he used. In that case it should be fine. Also the amperage draw of your GPS is likely quite low and might not be an issue even if it was tied into the headlight circuit. In any case, it would be good for you to know which circuit he used in case you have any future wiring problems.

As a general rule it is not safe to bypass a relay. The purpose of the relay is to allow very small wires to be used for control of the circuit, right up to the relay. The relay will then use heavier wires to send current to the actual load which in this case is your headlight. If you are certain that your bypass setup is only on the heavier wires then it should be ok, but in that case you won't have any way to use the handlebar switches to turn the headlights on or off. The final caveat is that without studying the wiring diagram, I cannot say for certain if a bypass can be done safely.
The way I understand the diagram for the Headlight Relay is that, it cut's the power to my headlights so the starter motor wont have any issue starting the Bike. Or maybe i'm wrong.
I bypass the Relay Box by de-pinning the Grey wire (from the 10A Fuse in the fuse box) and the Yellow and Blue wire (coming the the relay box going to the Left Switch Housing). To my testing I have kept all my headlight functions, Left Switch Housing Low beam and high beam, even the SpeedoMeter high beam indicator works. However I am very mindful that this would stop the safety circuit thats cutting off my headlight power to help the starter start the Bike. So I thought if I install a small switch in-between the bypass wire, I can manual cut the power to the headlights so I wont have problem starting the Bike. I'm using the same exact wire's my Bike use to make sure the wire can handle the load.
I hope that make sense.
If you want I can show you my wiring diagram so you can see my thinking.
 

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Ok so how about an explanation of your bypass and basic function of the circuit? The diagram is hard to follow without a lot of zooming and scrolling that just gives me a headache. It really should be printed out on a C or D size sheet of paper to make sense of it. There appears to be much more going on here than the older bikes I used to work on.

What troubles me the most, is that there has to be a root cause for the relay box failures and to ignore that with a bypass could be detrimental. Have you tried checking the charging circuit? With headlight off, measure voltage at the battery at idle and again at 4,000 RPM. What do you get?

Also what did you get on your resistance checks?
 
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