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TrashMonkey said:
Yesterday morning here in TN a man was killed on his motorcycle while at an intersection when an 18 wheeler decided not to stop for a traffic light. Watch those intersections, and never assume anyone is stopping or that they see you!!! Times like these we should remember our MSF training. Just wanted to tell everyone to be safe!
peace!
Chris
:shock: :shock: whoa, thats terrible....be careful every one :( :(
 

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Guys,
If your clutch hand is tired, well too bad :) Keep it in first at all lights, I only put it in neutral once I have watched the guy behind me come to a complete stop.
 

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Yeah, watch out for those other people. I remember years ago realizing that there is nothing about a red light that makes people stop. It doesn't put up a shield or a fence or a wall or anything -- it's just a light. In order for a car to stop, there is a huge chain of events that all have to work.
1. the traffic control system has to be functioning properly (don't give green light to both directions)
2. the wires to the traffic light have to be working.
3. the bulbs in the light have to be working.
4. the driver has to see the light.
5. the driver has to choose to stop.
6. the driver's reflexes have to be quick enough to stop.
7. the driver's foot has to land on the brake pedal (not accidently beside it).
8. the brake pedal assembly has to work properly.
9. the brake master cylinder has to work properly.
10. the brake lines have to be in tact and not clogged.
11. the brake caliper has to be not jammed.
12. the brake caliper has to be secured to the hub.
13. the hub has to be secured to the car.
14. the wheel has to be secured to the hub.
15. the wheel/road surface has to provide good traction.
16. the driver has to not hit the brake so hard as to cause a skid.
There's probably more events in the chain, but these are what came to my mind. It's a pretty long list, and every single one of those items has to work. A single failure in any one item can result in a dead biker. So I don't assume that anyone's going to stop until they're stopped. Then I don't assume that they're going to stay stopped until I'm out of the way.
Curt
 

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Stopping at red lights and stop signs has always been the least favorite and most stressful part of my rides. Thats because I am at my most vulnerable, that is, not moving with a heavy piece of steel below me. I always keep my hand on the clutch lever and the other hand on the throttle. Like Stuart said, I only pop into neutral once the car behind me has come to a complete stop.
 

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nine times out of 10..i dont even put it in neutral at lights...just because...
 

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I think he means just because the light is about to turn anyways, and I know that my clutch is designed to last forever :) I don't think i'll have to replace it in the entire life of the bike
 

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Thanks Curt for the reminder about all the things that need to happen to create a succesful stop at a light. Too often, while driving my goober-mobile, I just take it for granted! :shock:
 

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ski said:
i see, so the clutch in cycles last longer than ones in cars?
No. But if you treat a clutch right, it will last the life of the vehicle. I've been driving for about 25 years, and almost all of that on vehicles with a clutch. I've never had to replace a clutch on a single one of them in all those years. And I've put hundreds of thousands of miles on those clutches.

How do I do it? It's easy. Clutches wear because people let them slip. So just don't give it a chance to slip, and it will last for ages.

Step 1: take it easy in first gear. This ain't the drag strip here. Give the engine a comfortable amount of gas, but don't rev it up. Then let out the clutch gently but quickly. Then give some more gas for acceleration.
Step 2: when shifting, press in the clutch quickly, shift, use the gas to control the engine speed to match the clutch, then let out the clutch. You should have essentially no clutch wear in any gear except first, and not much in first.

Ninja Chick said:
Thanks Curt . . .
You're welcome.
Curt
 

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always leave your bike in first gear at lights and stop signs. point your bike toward the best escape route, and ALWAYS check behind you frequently. also leave yourself enough room to escape.
 

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Curt said:
ski said:
i see, so the clutch in cycles last longer than ones in cars?
No. But if you treat a clutch right, it will last the life of the vehicle. I've been driving for about 25 years, and almost all of that on vehicles with a clutch. I've never had to replace a clutch on a single one of them in all those years. And I've put hundreds of thousands of miles on those clutches.

How do I do it? It's easy. Clutches wear because people let them slip. So just don't give it a chance to slip, and it will last for ages.

Step 1: take it easy in first gear. This ain't the drag strip here. Give the engine a comfortable amount of gas, but don't rev it up. Then let out the clutch gently but quickly. Then give some more gas for acceleration.
Step 2: when shifting, press in the clutch quickly, shift, use the gas to control the engine speed to match the clutch, then let out the clutch. You should have essentially no clutch wear in any gear except first, and not much in first.
cool, thanks for the advice 8)
 
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