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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Voyager 1700

It's not actually the springs issue but something else. Pretty straight forward install.
My issue is now it's not free wheeling like it used too. What I mean is, when I walk it backwards to put it in the garage, it's taking ALOT more effort to push.
Do I have something too tight in the front?
I backed the axle off some, and the 2 fork bolts I also backed off some.
Still feels like something is hanging up. It's a "TANK" to push anyway but now it seems worse.
 

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Nothing being tightened in the front should affect the free wheeling of the bike, re-torque those fork bolts!! You may have brake calipers that are hung up, or something out of alignment. You post suggests you had it apart. I'd take it apart again, and then spin the wheel, with the front end jacked up, it should roll freely. If you do that test now, and your wheel is hard to turn, you may have put a space in improperly, and this could cause bearing failure. To me, it sounds like it should be taken apart, either take off the caliper(s) and see if it rolls easily, and if it doesn't, then continue with the disassembly. IMHO ;)
 

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I would imagine putting them back together the way they came off would work, but if something is bent? Great video, it seems like such common sense, sometimes you(me) forgets I learned it from somewhere! :)
 

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Even on a brand new bike, if you assemble incorrectly your fork legs can be out of parallel and will bind. Same thing for the calipers. I don't know if this is the issue that the OP is having, but I thought it was worth mentioning.
 

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I used to have to assemble bikes out of the crate. There used to be a company called "Cycle Salvage of New Haven Ct. They had a motorcycle frame straightening machine. ever new bike we put in there had crooked frames. We stopped putting them in there. We used the alignment method, but back then very few bikes bolted on the way bikes do now, they had the cups that locked into the axle. When the newer designs came in, we felt that taking the bike off the stand would let the bikes sit more naturally, then if something was off, it meant something was bent, or someone forgot fork oil in one leg, or the forks were twisted. This was also back when bikes came with really spindly legs. It took so long for bikes to get thick forks. The CBX Honda is an example of a huge bike with toothpicks for forks. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Well I found the issue. It was my fault. It had nothing to do with the brakes or the springs.
I had the wheel off to flush the old fluid after the springs install. I wasn't paying attention, and wasn't watching the rotation of the tire. I installed the wheel backwards. It must be something a little different in the alignment of the wheel to cause it to bind a little. I thought about it all night and this morning so I tore it back apart and noticed the direction arrow on the tire.
The tires are brand new so I didn't notice really any handling issue.
It was my STUPID fault for not paying attention.
It now turns MUCH easier. And I can tell by walking it back into the garage. Much much easier push
 

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Nothing stupid about making a mistake. It's a great way to learn. Many people will read this thread and not make this mistake. When they do a tire change, or take if off for some reason, this will stick in their brain. It' s great when someone poses the final outcome to a problem. This also a mistake many people make, but usually catch right away. What's worse is when the wheel fits both ways without a problem, and you have essentially destroyed the tire by running it both way, the wire inside the tire only works in one direction. Running it the other way could cause a blow out. I don't know if your tire is damaged internally or not but keep an eye, especially if it starts to hop a little under higher speeds, that could means it's out of round, and you need to replace it. If you didn't ride it, nothing to worry about. ;)
 

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I helped a friend with a similar issue on the rear wheel of his GPZ900R. The wheel was tight to turn by hand. He had a new rear tyre and unfortunately had reversed one of the spacers on reassembly which squeezed the bearing. We took the whole rear wheel off and I realised the spacer was on the wrong way. Once everything was aligned and torqued up to spec properly the rear wheel spun normally again. An easy mistake to make for any of us.
 

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I used to assemble new bikes too, but as you noted, back then the designs were much simpler and harder to mess it up.
I would have thought they were easier to mess up on the older bikes. They had spindly forks, yokes and spindles. Todays usd forks, thick yokes and large diameter wheel spindles along with only one spacer surely makes it harder to assemble it all out of alignment.
 

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Good point but I don't remember us having any issues. New bikes are definitely more rigid but also a heck of a lot more complicated. Nowadays bikes have cast wheels, dual disks, rear mounted calipers, upside down forks, anti-dive forks, air forks and various designs have been used for clamping of the axle.

Often the misalignment is so slight a rider may not notice it, but the suspension will be stiffer due to binding of the fork tubes against the seals and bushings.
 

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Good point but I don't remember us having any issues. New bikes are definitely more rigid but also a heck of a lot more complicated. Nowadays bikes have cast wheels, dual disks, rear mounted calipers, upside down forks, anti-dive forks, air forks and various designs have been used for clamping of the axle.

Often the misalignment is so slight a rider may not notice it, but the suspension will be stiffer due to binding of the fork tubes against the seals and bushings.
I have found Dave Moss Tuning videos to be invaluable. He's a real Pro. Even works for my old bike.
 

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I remember on the old Hondas you would squeeze the fork lowers to fit into the notches on the axle, tighten the fork lower end caps, then tighten the axle, and stick a cotter pin in the castle nut. The forks we really spindly. The Honda CBX, for the size of the bike, has the most spindly forks I've ever seen. I couldn't believe how skinny they were considering that other manufacturers were already using larger diameter fork tunes. I remember a guy at the old Bridgehampton, L.I. race track trying to race one, and watching the bike flex it's front end through the turns. I only saw him try and race once. The bike looked really nice Cafe style fairings on it. It looked the part, but couldn't walk the part. It's amazing how much a clean CBX is going for now. :)
 
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