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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm at the point where it's time to start working on the cosmetic area of my 83's refurb. Although the paint isn't as bad as some I see, the bike is 40 years old after all and the paint needs help. I decided to keep the original colors and scheme but get it in shape for next summer. I am using Rest-oleum 2X because it provides a pretty good finish for the least amount of money. If you prep the surface properly and follow the directions, it does a darned good job. The only thing you have to look out for is when it's used on gas tanks and spill a lot of gas on it, it will run a little and I've found it's best in those cases to just let it dry without rubbing it with a rag or you'll end up with a mess. So far I've done the tank and side panels and am about to do the front fender. I found the original pin-striping to be in pretty good shape so I leave that in place and use it as a guide between colors. I'll try to get a snapshot of some of the pieces. I don't have the badges or final clear-coat on yet. Peripheral Office equipment Input device Gadget Automotive design
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would apply a couple of layers of clear coat. That will protect the paint. Get automotive quality, and you should be good to go. There is a spray that is used when painting on a painted surface, that really make the paint bond on excellently. You just wipe it on. Your local Auto body Supply shop will know the name. I have a can in my barn, it would take me so long to find, I would probably just buy a new one, but you wipe each area only once, wait 15 minutes DON'T TOUCH THE SURFACE! Then spray the surface, the results are amazing. :)
I have quite a way to go yet. I will wet sand and give probably another three or four coats of both the silver and black. I should have shown some original photos. Fortunately, the badging covers a lot of the worst parts. I'm pretty sure they'll turn out pretty well in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'll give that a try as I'm just starting on the wheels which had plenty of built up crud and oxidation. I used several different cleaning methods and found that when it came to bringing back the luster to the polished parts of the wheel I had to use a combination of steel wool and 400 grit sandpaper. That really made a difference. Rubbing with any polishing compound was getting me no where fast. I'll post some pictures later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Once the heavy oxidization has been removed, a product like Autosol will work wonders. (no affiliation)
I've never heard of that product. Exactly what does it do. I'm most concerned now how to keep the shiny part of the wheels from re-oxidizing. What, other than a clear coat type of paint, is out there?
 
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