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The little guy said it.
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,
I went searching all over the place and couldn't find anything to address a small issue that I seem to be having on my bike:
When I'm using the rear brake, it feels like the rear end of the bike is starting to drift to the right. I keep the tires properly inflated and check tire pressure every day to make sure it's correct.
So, could it be a problem, or is it something that I'm causing?

Thanks,
~oz
 

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The little guy said it.
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17,962 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm not joking when I say this, but the rear tire feels like it wants to pull to that side. I've locked up the back tire a couple of times, and both times it pulled to the right. When I do some heavy braking on the rear tire, the bike has a tendency to do the same thing. I don't have any means to check the alignment, but I can have someone do that for me. Good point - thanks for the advice! BTW, what ships did you serve on? I'm one of those who dwells within the briny depths...the sub sailor...
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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8,842 Posts
All the bikes I've ever ridden want to swap ends if you lock the rear tire. As a kid on my bicycle I did the same thing and found that I could control the slide with the handle bars. By counter steering, you can keep the back tire from coming around and passing the front tire and if you turn far enough you can actually cause the back tire to move to the other side and try to pass on the opposite side. Maybe you are turning the bars slightly left as you brake hard and don't realize it?

I was on carriers, the USS Midway, home ported in Japan and on the USS Guadalcanal out of Virginia. Spent my time with search & rescue helo squadrons trying to prevent downed pilots or ships crew that fell overboard from joining you in those briny depths. :wink: :lol:
 

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The little guy said it.
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17,962 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I was thinking that I might be inducing the problem, but I'm still non too sure. When I go riding later I'll have to keep my senses up when I brake so I can figure it out. I'm *hoping* that it's just my imagination.

Spent my time with search & rescue helo squadrons trying to prevent downed pilots or ships crew that fell overboard from joining you in those briny depths
LOL. Thanks for your service to our country!
 

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Vintage bike addict
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4,812 Posts
You're gonna be sitting a little heavier left side when applying the rear brake. It's normal. You lift the right leg and push down with the right leg. Your body is planted left of center when you do that. Until you can keep yourself centered or learn how to compensate it will continue to happen. Do you notice your left shoulder drop just slightly as you use the rear brake?
 

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The little guy said it.
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17,962 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
You're gonna be sitting a little heavier left side when applying the rear brake. It's normal. You lift the right leg and push down with the right leg. Your body is planted left of center when you do that. Until you can keep yourself centered or learn how to compensate it will continue to happen. Do you notice your left shoulder drop just slightly as you use the rear brake?
That makes sense too. When I was out riding last night I didn't really notice it as much as I had before...it looks like I've been inducing it the whole time. Thanks for the advice, guys.
 

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Super Moderator
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That makes sense too. When I was out riding last night I didn't really notice it as much as I had before...it looks like I've been inducing it the whole time. Thanks for the advice, guys.
The last two bikes I've had tended to do as you describe. Try these:

- with a helper, tie a fishing string to the right side of the front axle, then run the string around the front then all the way down the left side of your bike. Turn the handlebars so the string is straight with the sidewalls of the front tire. Then you can see if the rear tire is in line with the front one.

- check your rear brake pedal and the MOM for adjusting it. I've adjusted my pedal down some so that normal hard braking will not lock up the wheel, but conscious increased pressure will.

Bubblehead here too. Boomer. 6 patrols.
 

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ULTIMATE Forum Supporter
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7,748 Posts
The last two bikes I've had tended to do as you describe. Try these:

- with a helper, tie a fishing string to the right side of the front axle, then run the string around the front then all the way down the left side of your bike. Turn the handlebars so the string is straight with the sidewalls of the front tire. Then you can see if the rear tire is in line with the front one.

- check your rear brake pedal and the MOM for adjusting it. I've adjusted my pedal down some so that normal hard braking will not lock up the wheel, but conscious increased pressure will.

Bubblehead here too. Boomer. 6 patrols.
Learn Simple Motorcycle Wheel Alignment – Motorcyclist Online
 

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Super Moderator
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10,837 Posts
You did say that, I'm just slow so pictures help me. :)
We should design a service manual structured like a comic book. It would so much clearer to me....
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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8,842 Posts
Nice tip with the string alignment trick. I do carpentry work so I have a nice 8' aluminum straightedge for ripping plywood that I use so it's never been a problem for me but that makes it easy for anyone to do.
 
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