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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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Ok folks, I know lots of us have learned some "How to's" whether it be from surfing the net or through trial and error or some other way. I'd like to see those tips stockpiled here for others to reference. If you know of something that might help others or you think someone might like to know, like "How to do xxxx" then post it up here. It doesn't matter if it's polishing stainless/chrome or cleaning/painting wheels etc. If it works, and gives that factory new look with lasting results, then post away. I'd like to see tips that would help people with getting that factory new look back and it doesn't matter if it's cheap or expensive as long as it works with the desired results.

If you want to discuss a particular tip, please do it in a new post instead of cluttering this thread up with conversation and hopefully that will keep this thread compact and jammed full of useful ideas/tips.



I'll start it off with something that bothered me for a while on my bike.

My handlebar switchgear housings were grey and faded from all the sun/weather and oxidation they've received over the years. A good buffing with Scotchbrite, then a wipe with a rag with a little silicone has brought the housing back to that new black look. I'm still working on the red buttons like the kill/start button or horn button which don't look as good with the same treatment.
 

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Re-zink all the bolts, nuts, screws etc (not the chrome ones). They will look good as new and the cost is next to nothing.

Take lots of pictures before a teardown. It will help you getting it right putting the bike back together.

Get zip bags for the various small parts and mark them thoroughly so that you understand what it is 2 years down the road.

Mark the different wires in the harness before you disconnect them. There's just no way you'll remember which was connected to what in 6 months. I can't even remember what I did last week.
 

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Re-zink all the bolts, nuts, screws etc (not the chrome ones). They will look good as new and the cost is next to nothing.

Take lots of pictures before a teardown. It will help you getting it right putting the bike back together.

Get zip bags for the various small parts and mark them thoroughly so that you understand what it is 2 years down the road.

Mark the different wires in the harness before you disconnect them. There's just no way you'll remember which was connected to what in 6 months. I can't even remember what I did last week.
+1

You've done this before, haven't you? :lol:
 

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Red is Faster
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Have trouble keeping a gasket in place, bolting pieces together at an odd angle? Tie the gasket to one half with sewing thread.

Buy those little magnetic bowls at the cheap tool store. They're a heck of a lot better than coffee cans, if you can even find coffee cans anymore.
 

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this may sound like cooking class, but heres two. these are tested and work
rubber parts, carb boots ect, as long as there not cracked can be restored made limber by simmering in wintergreen oil.
carbs boiled in lemon juice to clean , carbs must be stripped , they will look new. (be sure use a deep pan they will foam up)
I will post how to when ive got time to find the pics and specs.
 

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+1

You've done this before, haven't you? :lol:
A few times, yes. It took me about seven years to finish my H2. I had serious problems figuring out the location of various parts. :smile:
 

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I also make little sketches with bolt info if different length or types of bolts are used to hold one part and than just drop the sketch in the bag with the bolts. I also do quicky sketches for things like wire placement. Pictures and a permanent marker also work. Write down what exactly you were taking the picture for on the back. Don't trust your memory to tell you why you took the picture and what you were trying to show.
 

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Also, fine steel wool and a lot of lot of elbow grease works wonders on chrome that has spots of surface rust.
 

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I found it handy to take a video as it is being pulled apart, whilst you have a video of the complete assembly, you can verbally make notes as you go along.
 

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Restore your handlebar controls:
1. Wirebrush the surfaces to clean the paint out of the letters. Rub the surface with a scotchbrite pad or steel wool to smooth.
2. Primer and Paint the entire control. Duplicolor black gloss finish looks good, but is shinier than the original finish. Let dry.
3. Using water based latex paint, dap the paint into the letters. Wipe the wet paint off with a damp rag. The paint will remain in the letters.
 

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ok heres the quoted wintergreen oil rubber resto reciepe

quote.
First off, you'll need an old cooking pot. I used a 2 Lb coffee tin.
You'll need something to keep the boots from burning to the bottom or melting. I used an old CB750 points cover. any old grill or grate will work, or even constant stirring will do the job too.
You'll also need a stove of some sort. I used my antique coleman stove for the job.

You'll need enough water to cover your boots.
You'll need a small amount of wintergreen Oil. I used 3 ounces in my 2 Lb coffee tin. Wintergreen Oil is an analgesic, its used for aching muscles and arthritis treatment. You should be able to pick it up in pharmacies or health food stores. I got mine at walmart for 5.00


Set the whole mess on the stove and bring to a slow boil for about 20 minutes. Let the mess cool until manageable.

next lemon juice carb cleaner. this comes from a cat named joewiseguy.



quote

Posted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 2:59 pm Post subject:

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Laugh if you will , but this is the easiest and fastest way I have found to clean carbs and have now done many this way and swear by it !
To give credit where it is due , I stole this procedure from Joe Wiseguy .
You take the carb apart as you would for a rebuild . Some remove the rubber , some don't . I've done it both ways with the same results .
Put it in a metal container and cover it with straight lemon juice . Yup , lemon juice !
Bring to a boil , turn down to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes or until well done
You need to keep adding lemon juice periodically to keep all the parts covered .
This process REALLY stinks (do not even attempt in the house) and your "pot" will no longer be good for mac & cheese .
Once the time is up , pull out parts with pliers , blow out with compressor and reassemble .
Beware the finish on the outside of the carb will most likely be removed and will look just like in my pics . It does not rust or anything , just looks like my pics .






 

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Obsessed by Z1's
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Some of the simple things are often overlooked...

1) Know what you want to achieve before you start
2) Set a budget
3) Create and maintain a work list
4) Be realistic in your abilities, and/or the limitations of your tools/workshop
5) Research what parts are available (and their cost) BEFORE you start.

I've seen too many bikes get started on, then abandoned as money runs out. or problems overwhelm the owner.

The first item is key...
Are you restoring a bike?
Are you just getting it running as transport?
Are you looking to upgrade the bike from stock or customize it?
Are you looking to just turn the bike around and sell it for a profit?
Will you ride it once it's done?
 
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