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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1997 Vulcan 800 see attachment.

I painted the tank and fenders a few years ago. I heard that you can get a pretty good satin black paint job from spray paint cans. So i thought I'd give it a chance. I preped the surface, and applied about 4 coats with a rattle can of rustolium satin black. After filling up the gas tank once, I saw a couple spots that showed up from little gas spashes. So I found some satin clear coat in a rattle can and sprayed the tins again. This helped a little, but any sort of gas that hit the tank would leave a very small mark, even after wiped off. I only had the paint job in the sun for about 3 months and it was usually kept in my garage during that time. I was rear ended, and the bike tipped over, in the photo you can see where the gas poored out of the tank and ate right through the satin paint. I am ready for something that will last.

I'm ready to do a satin paint job the correct way, but I'm not a painter and don't know what the correct way is. I've ready about urethane paints and epoxy paints, as well as hardeners and other mixes. Can someone give me a good idea how to go about painting my bike satin black with the right steps? and protection to use?

I've done hundreds of google searches and can't find anything I really trust. Just a lot of people that want a satin paint job but don't know how to do something that will last.

Thanks
 

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I use black ureithane epoxy primer by itself gas won't hurt it .You can get it in spraycans by SEM, Nason or R&M. The clear I mix 2 parts clear and 1 part flating agent with clear hardner. As far as satin or flat clear i can only spray it with a spray gun never seen flat clear in a rattle can that would hold up to gas. Shiney clear Yes . R&m makes automotive clear in spraycans and the tip has a nice wide fan but its not flat.. In the next 2 weeks I'm doing a black denim Harley color on my bike..:smile:
 

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are you wanting to use correct painting techniques? guns? & do you own a compressor? or you low budgeting?

how are you wanting to paint?

I used to paint profesionally, once upon a time until the early to mid 1990's

do you want paint already already low gloss? I think house of color offers satin blacks, or do you want to flatten out the paint yourself with a flattening agent? another way to have fun is the various shades of black, & then you flatten it out yourself, there are some old shades back in old days, blacker than normal blacks, & several shades of same blacks depending on the mixing formulas, that are considered to be supposedly same shade, but major differences in the look.

Later,
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for your advice.

It would be nice to do it all with rattle cans, but I think I have everything I need to do it with a spray gun, compressor, etc. But like I said, i don't really know how to use any of it. I am not familiar with "Flatting out the paint" or the different steps for applying paint, primer, hardners (I don't even know what hardners are), and any other steps. Just trying to get a feeling for what I'm getting myself into if I decide to go the gun, compressor, etc. route. If it's worth the extra effort, or if I should just stick to rattle cans?
 

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ok well every paint company, has different formulas for mixing, & different paints with tne same company mix differently

ok for example if you get a base coat, clear coat. you will mix so many ounces of base color, then add reducer, for the particular paint, then hardener. mixing cups from paint companies have the stages right on them to mix by.

clear is mixed the same way, fill to first measure of clear, second measure with reducer & lastly add hardner.

you will spray paint evenly in light thin coats, allowing a correct flash time between coats. once coverage is achieved, you will then repeat with clear & apply 2 + coats of clear, & then possibly have to sand orange peel out of the clear, & then buff,

there are different speeds of reducers, or hardeners, based on outside or spraying temps, their are additives to stop fish eyes from appearing.

as for the flattening agent just follow directions, several companies make flattening agents, you just add it to the paint, & it will tell you how much to add for what degree of flattening you want, so you can achieve a semi gloss to a totally flat & everywhere inbetween, depending on how you mix it & results are duplicateable

also if you add it to paint, it counts as paint & the reducer & hardner is added afterwards.

now for primer, there are surfacers, & sealers, metal etchers, I know of guys that swear by etching, & others that dont care & all have pretty good paint jobs.

the primer sealers, use a hardner like the paint & clear, & everything may or may not use the same hardners, a primer surfacer is used for building to fill in any slight imperfections like sanding scratches.


strip old paint off, wipe metal with a wax & grease remover, spray 2 to 3 coats of primer with sufficient flash time between coats, allow to dry correctly, then "sand with 400 to 600 grit paper we can discuss this" then wipe with wax & grease remover again, & allow to dry a few minutes & then start applying paint.

I will also mention 1 stage paints which would be a cheaper option, you wont need anything but reducer with them, & wont need any clear, as once you spray a few coats, & allow to dry it would be done.

any good paint supply shop for the automotive industry, will be able get you what you need, but you may be in for sticker shock! a few years ago I spent nearly $500 for enough supplies to repaint a bike, but you have left over everything. however for around $100 plus or minus you could do it in a single stage.

if interested I will try to look up some of the stuff I have used a few times.

I have used quite a few different types of paint over the last 20 years.

anyway holler back & we can discuss further.

Later,
Randy
 

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A couple of guys here in town used Rhino truck bed coating on their tanks and fenders that looks **** good and is tough as nails! Gasoline and acid resistant too! :wink:
Can you get that stuff smoothed on or it it a rough texture?
I think it would be a good way to do the frame and such.

I think next time I paint it will be a distressed look that way if I mess up...er... when I mess up :eek: ... it will look like I did it on purpose. :biggrin:

I have to repaint my front fender. Was doing brake work and some brake fluid ran down the fender. I spotted it a few days later or I could have just wiped it off.
 

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Can you get that stuff smoothed on or it it a rough texture?
I think it would be a good way to do the frame and such.

I think next time I paint it will be a distressed look that way if I mess up...er... when I mess up :eek: ... it will look like I did it on purpose. :biggrin:

I have to repaint my front fender. Was doing brake work and some brake fluid ran down the fender. I spotted it a few days later or I could have just wiped it off.
hmm...........

an old painting technique, not used much anymore...

spray the color you want part to be, then for a second color you put basically undiluted paint in paint gun & spray it at high air pressure like 90psi at the gun.

what your trying to do is to spray streaks of paint in strings, over top your base color, "the effect is called cobwebbing" some people like it some dont. then if you clear coat it quite a few times & then sand the clear to get it smooth.

one of my friends used to run black painted parts, with orange cobwebbing, everyone thought it was rust, & he would cuss you out in a heartbeat, lol it was custom painted by him, he also had a red van with black cobwebbing & had drawn a spider on each side... lol

there are some on purpose accidental painting techniques, or stuff hard to figure out how it was done,

the other day I looked at a bike which someone had sprayed the front fender & gas tank in stripes of different colors, & allowed to dry, then sprayed a "fog" coat of black, & allowed to dry, then sprayed heavy coat of purple & either used saran wrap or tinfoil rolled up & gave the parts texture, & had then allowed that to dry & had cleared it & sanded & cleared it to a smooth finish, it looked pretty good but a couple of the base colors wasnt my taste.

dont be afraid to try something & if you want to ask me feel free, I dont know everything, & I am not up to date with the latest in body work, but I did it professionally a bunch of years & off & on for close to 30 from my first days when I didnt know what I was doing, to when I could do beautiful custom paint jobs. I still use old suction feed paint guns, I have around 15 various ones I have used for different things. I have used gravity guns, sprayed maybe 3 cars with & misc parts with, but dont own one. I misplaced my old "bubbler pot" suction gun, it had an air bleed to agitate the paint in the guns cup so when you sprayed real large flakes & heavy flakes it would help to keep it in suspension & would help to keep paint from "mottling"

there is sponge painting, along with "flame painting" that you use an accetelene torch with oxygen turned off & lightly touch painted surfaces with the carburizing smoke from the tip, then maybe paint over or clear over. I have taped up flame designs, & flame painted across the tape & when you pulled tape you had smoke colored flames, then clear over it. that was first unusual painting technique I taught my wife. I flame painted an old vw bus.

there is shark skin, or waves & was a few other names where you use index cards, or poster board paper & cut ridges, spikes, scallops, etc, & spray along cut outs, & slightly adjust & spray until you get the desired effect. sometimes you go down sometimes you go up.

I guy I used to do work to his bike was done as a tattoo....... I forget the exact color, but he had done all the sheet metal as a full size tattoo & it looked good!!!!!!

hope I am getting interest????????? I would love to see some of the old techniques come back..... I grew up in the 70's & got into painting in the early 1980's & loved all the old painting techniques I saw growing up, some wild 70's stuff. even some of modern painting techniques are old.

one odd thing I will mention, people love their custom paintjobs.... well one custom that really isnt is the fades, where vehicle is painted one color, then another color fades into the first, all that is is like someone that didnt want to bother making a smooth transition from one color to another color. General Motors made alot of these style vehicles.... if you look you will see the overspray of second color onto the first color & then they clear coat over it! YUCK, to me it shows unprofesionalism even if it comes like that new & looks custom! to do it right they will need sticky tape, & changing color slightly as it gets to the tape, when paint hits the tape edge it will give a softer edge, & then go to nest color from the sticky edge, you will have to mode edge from one color to the next, & its doable, but will require more work!

to get an example of a soft edge roll 2" masking tape into a tube, maybe 1/4" pipe looking. now lay the pipe on part & when you spray just spray normally, now lift & you will see the edge of paint where paint gets thin under tube to almost a point, where if you lay masking tape it will leave an abrupt edge, & wil require work to make a smooth transition, where what GM did was not even use a edge & just left paint overspray all over & call it custom!!

anyone feel free to ask questions,

Later,
Randy
 

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Can you get that stuff smoothed on or it it a rough texture?
I think it would be a good way to do the frame and such.

I think next time I paint it will be a distressed look that way if I mess up...er... when I mess up :eek: ... it will look like I did it on purpose. :biggrin:

I have to repaint my front fender. Was doing brake work and some brake fluid ran down the fender. I spotted it a few days later or I could have just wiped it off.
No, it was a textured look and they somehow embossed a raised scull and cross bones on the tank that looked really good actually!......."fur jap v-twins" Theyre both those older 750 Shadows and are "spunky" :lol: "Baby Doll" still eats their lunch though,no surprise there, although they are fast! "Fur little bitty 750s"! :lol: How bout it steell? :lol:
 

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I just painted a job for a guy about a month ago, Awesome satin black- very durable. It is a 3 part paint (mix 3 parts together, and lay down 3 coats). I got it from the local paint shop named - Hot rod black- comes all in 1 box as a kit. I think it was like 60 bucks. This is "the right way"
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Speedy400, That's sounds about like what I am looking for. What kind of prep work did you do? I googled "Hot Rod Black" and found the Kustom paint. However this looks like it might be a flat?

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Did you do any clear coat after the 3 coats of the Hot Rod Black? Any idea how this stuff holds up?
 

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hey, I also painted the custom bumper on my jeep with it, and am very surprised how well it has held up latly with all the rocks on the road latly here in colorado. it is a satin black, you will be very happy with it. as for prep I just sanded the metal with 220. Consicering it'll be on your cycle, I would use a 2 part epoxy primer, then wet sand that with 400 grit sand paper, then shoot 3 coats of the black-it will be flawless. no clearcoat needed.
 
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