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OK so I ahev been doing my research on cycle helmets and it seems like the snell standards are a bit higher and cost a bit more. I mean how cheap do you want protection to go, but seriously a 100-200% difference in cost between helmet costs seems a little excessive. Can anyone share their thoughts.
 

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I have some DOT only, and some Snell rated helmets.
Some say the harder shell of some helmets actually is worse in a real life crash, as it causes more impact to your head, instead of the helmet absorbing it..........so arguements seem to go both ways.

I am fine riding in a DOT helmet as the government at least here is OVER PROTECTIVE of people IMHO.

If the same people that make us carry all kids in a car seat tied down better than a D8 cat is on a low bed, or we must have child proof everything, our kids cannot take a peanut butter saammich to school, and I have to wear a seat belt to go to the corner store, and on and on.
If those people who are worse than my Mother for being over protective say its safe, then I believe it meets some dang good standards of testing.
So I ride more and worry less, as it should be.
 

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I'm your Huckleberry
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There is not a 100-200% difference in just that. We've gotten into this in another current thread already (the high end helmets offer many different things, usually unrelated to safety, that result in a higher price tag).

http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/kawasaki-cruisers/123706-best-helmets.html

My HJC CL-15 (there's a newer model out now) was Snell and DOT rated and cost about $80 from my dealer.

Don't get hung up on the ratings (unless you're going to a track...many require Snell rated helmets). Get the one that fits right, and is in your budget. THAT is the most important thing.
 

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I'm a big proponent of the British Government's Sharp 5 Star Rating System. It tests how EFFECTIVE helmets are at protecting after they meet the minimum European standards, which are equal to DOT. You'd be surprised how many premium brands' models do not get 5 stars.

SHARP - The Helmet Safety Scheme
 

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I'm a big proponent of the British Government's Sharp 5 Star Rating System. It tests how EFFECTIVE helmets are at protecting after they meet the minimum European standards, which are equal to DOT. You'd be surprised how many premium brands' models do not get 5 stars.

SHARP - The Helmet Safety Scheme
Just want to point out: many of the older design results will not be applicable over here. It was nearly impossible to design a helmet to pass European standards and get a Snell M2005 rating. So any helmet sold here with a Snell M2005 certification will not be the same as the helmet sold in Europe (good or bad, who really knows? :confused: )...even if they are the same model.

Now the new helmets with the revised Snell M2010 ratings should be applicable or any helmet that was offered with only DOT (no Snell) and ECE REG 22.05.

Looking at Shoei (all I care about at this particular moment since thats what I own ;) )...the equivalent of the RF1000 (XR1000) scored a 3 star rating...its replacement, the RF1100 (XR1100) scored a 5 star rating. Its good to see helmet construction moving forward.
 

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A couple of months ago in either Motor Cyclist or Sport Rider, they reported that Snell finally acquiesced to complaints that their standards were too strict because of their testing requiring that the helmet be able to sustain two bounces off of a round surface. So they are actually going to change their standards; I'm not sure about this part but I believe that it's one bounce off of a flat surface from a specific height.

And yes, price difference is the result if brand name, materials, features and brand name...did I mention brand name? And I'm not knocking brand name helmets either--i wear an RF1000 and will touch no other helmet.
 

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Along the same lines, but a little different. I know that one should replace helmets after a few years even if they haven't been in an accident or dropped or anything. What if they are an old model that hasn't sold so has never been worn. Are those okay? I'm talking an '06 model.
 

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Along the same lines, but a little different. I know that one should replace helmets after a few years even if they haven't been in an accident or dropped or anything. What if they are an old model that hasn't sold so has never been worn. Are those okay? I'm talking an '06 model.
According to Shoei, its 7 years after the manufacture, 5 years after you start wearing it...whichever comes first.

As for the new Snell ratings, I also thought Motorcyclist had covered the new standards, but could not find it. webBikeWorld did:

Snell 2010 Standard - webBikeWorld
 

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According to Shoei, its 7 years after the manufacture, 5 years after you start wearing it...whichever comes first.

As for the new Snell ratings, I also thought Motorcyclist had covered the new standards, but could not find it. webBikeWorld did:

Snell 2010 Standard - webBikeWorld
Actually, the Motorcyclist article was Ken's (the Head Editor) commentary (I'm sure that you and I read the same editorial) and he was applauding Snell for finally owning up to their error. He only mentioned that the new standards will be applied in 2010--not specifically what they would be.
 

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Actually, the Motorcyclist article was Ken's (the Head Editor) commentary (I'm sure that you and I read the same editorial) and he was applauding Snell for finally owning up to their error. He only mentioned that the new standards will be applied in 2010--not specifically what they would be.
Ah...that'd be why I couldn't find it :lol:
 

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If you're riding within legal limits, or just a little bit over, a softer helmet will do you better. The less energy transferred to your brain the better. Sure, a Snell may be able to take a much larger impact, but from what I've learned and what most of my EMS friends say, those higher impacts usually cause other severe problems. Break your femur when you run into that guard rail and sever your femoral artery, and it won't matter how good your helmet is. Anecdotal, but take it as you will.
 

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I'm a big proponent of the British Government's Sharp 5 Star Rating System. It tests how EFFECTIVE helmets are at protecting after they meet the minimum European standards, which are equal to DOT. You'd be surprised how many premium brands' models do not get 5 stars.

SHARP - The Helmet Safety Scheme
I wore a Takachi (pricier Nitro helmet, identical to a TT helmet they released which someone stole on me) and my head was hit against a gate pillar during an accident where both arms and the left leg were broken. I got another more recently, and after a more recent accident where a van cut me off I got an AGV, which was Buell branded so relatively cheap. I think my Takachi got a three star from them, so I dunno recently. It made some Arai wearing riders real angry, making them look like people who got a helmet because of it's brand name.
 

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Either one can be good. A higher price doesn not necessarily mean a better helmet, but usually more "bells and whistles". The right fit for your head is VERY important and the helmet should be new, not used or been worn through an impact incident. The best way to make up your mind on which standard you want your helmet to meet is to read and UNDERSTAND the standards to which each organization tests their helmets. In my opinion, the helmet should be able to protect your head first in a fall from about 5 feet, which is probably a little higher than the average motorcycle fall (unless you are a stunter). Second, it must be able to protect your head from any kind of abrasion in the sometimes long slide that can follow a get off. Third, is the possible sudden stop that the helmet must protect your head from and not transmit too many decceleartion G forces to the brain. Another thing that "can" be important is the ability to resist penetration, but now we are getting into "good things" to have, but not absolutely necessary. For a great amount of money (and maybe a larger weight than the head's supporting structure can handle in an accident sequence) a helmet can be built that would resist the impact of a D9 Caterpillar tractor going 150 miles per hour. LOL. My point is, the protection should be matched to what has been statistically proven to be the most likely forces encountered in an accident sequence.

Light weight along with good fit and protection that meets your requirements are the top three in my book. Well, my wife would say that having the right color to be coordinated with whichever motorcycle I happen to be riding is IMPORTANT! I guess that is why I have about 8 helmets in the garage! :p
 

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Along the same lines, but a little different. I know that one should replace helmets after a few years even if they haven't been in an accident or dropped or anything. What if they are an old model that hasn't sold so has never been worn. Are those okay? I'm talking an '06 model.
Even if a helmet hasn't been worn, glues and other elements of the helmet will break down over time. An '06 model would still be OK, but its age means you won't be able to wear it as long after you start using it.
 

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Even if a helmet hasn't been worn, glues and other elements of the helmet will break down over time. An '06 model would still be OK, but its age means you won't be able to wear it as long after you start using it.
I was told on my CBT (UK motorcycle training course) that you should look at replacing a thermoplastic helmet after 3 years and a fibreglass one after 5.

Seems a little too cautious to me though - there are thermoplastic helmet manufacturers that offer 5 year warranties; there's no reason why they should do that if the helmet would be past its useful lifespan in just 3.

Does anyone know how long this deterioration actually takes a) in storage b) in use?


As for the original topic, I wouldn't buy a Snell certified helmet myself as I think I paid far too much for my current helmet as it is. There are perfectly good and just as safe (SHARP 4* or above) helmets at quite a bit less than I paid for mine (I've noticed the cheapest, made in China helmets are usually subjected to more tests than others - making one helmet suitable for all markets. Don't know about comfort though). I'd be absolutely livid if I dropped it and had to replace it before its expected lifespan. Obviously being in the US though you'll have to make sure its been put through the DOT tests as well as the ECE & SHARP tests.
 

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I was told on my CBT (UK motorcycle training course) that you should look at replacing a thermoplastic helmet after 3 years and a fibreglass one after 5.

Seems a little too cautious to me though - there are thermoplastic helmet manufacturers that offer 5 year warranties; there's no reason why they should do that if the helmet would be past its useful lifespan in just 3.

Does anyone know how long this deterioration actually takes a) in storage b) in use?


As for the original topic, I wouldn't buy a Snell certified helmet myself as I think I paid far too much for my current helmet as it is. There are perfectly good and just as safe (SHARP 4* or above) helmets at quite a bit less than I paid for mine (I've noticed the cheapest, made in China helmets are usually subjected to more tests than others - making one helmet suitable for all markets. Don't know about comfort though). I'd be absolutely livid if I dropped it and had to replace it before its expected lifespan. Obviously being in the US though you'll have to make sure its been put through the DOT tests as well as the ECE & SHARP tests.
Keeping them out of the sun when not in use is the key.
Store your helmet in a place like a dark closet, not hanging on your bike, or a bookshelf in the open.
 

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I was told on my CBT (UK motorcycle training course) that you should look at replacing a thermoplastic helmet after 3 years and a fibreglass one after 5.

Seems a little too cautious to me though - there are thermoplastic helmet manufacturers that offer 5 year warranties; there's no reason why they should do that if the helmet would be past its useful lifespan in just 3.

Does anyone know how long this deterioration actually takes a) in storage b) in use?
I agree that would be overly cautious on the plastic front, but I would replace any helmet after 5 years due to the inevitable compression that occurs with the energy absorbing foam over the years. In addition, after 5 years of use, a helmet gets bumped around a lot and really is due for it anyway.

Giving different recommendations for plastic vs. fiberglass is pretty suspect, in my book. The shell is seldom the problem or the reason to replace the helmet. It's the energy absorbing foam and the glues that degrade, not the shell (unless you leave it sitting out in the sun all the time - and by all the time, I mean way more than just during a ride). The shell is protected by paint and is good for longer than the protective materials. If plastic degraded that quickly, we'd be in real trouble with all those body panels on our bikes.

As for the original topic, I wouldn't buy a Snell certified helmet myself as I think I paid far too much for my current helmet as it is. There are perfectly good and just as safe (SHARP 4* or above) helmets at quite a bit less than I paid for mine (I've noticed the cheapest, made in China helmets are usually subjected to more tests than others - making one helmet suitable for all markets. Don't know about comfort though). I'd be absolutely livid if I dropped it and had to replace it before its expected lifespan. Obviously being in the US though you'll have to make sure its been put through the DOT tests as well as the ECE & SHARP tests.
Several helmets that meet both Snell and DOT standards are well under $150. You're not going to save much more than that and still get a helmet that either a) is comfortable to wear, b) doesn't deafen you from wind noise, c) isn't a pain to remove the shield, padding or other things you might want to swap out or clean or d) doesn't fall apart after a year or so.

My HJC was around $130, is relatively quiet, is comfortable, offers good venting, is solidly built and removing the shield and head liner can be done in seconds.
 

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Several helmets that meet both Snell and DOT standards are well under $150. You're not going to save much more than that and still get a helmet that either a) is comfortable to wear, b) doesn't deafen you from wind noise, c) isn't a pain to remove the shield, padding or other things you might want to swap out or clean or d) doesn't fall apart after a year or so.

My HJC was around $130, is relatively quiet, is comfortable, offers good venting, is solidly built and removing the shield and head liner can be done in seconds.
Yup...got my HJC CL-15 for $80 from the dealer when I bought my 900...Snell and DOT certified.
 
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