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I wonder if those that make that claim, have actually ridden a bike with solid wheels?..........anyone?
 

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Vulcan 1600 Classic
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I would think that as a wheel is spinning at a high rate of speed - even the sloted rims like on my Vulcan Classic would act about the same in a cross wind as a solid rim!
 

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I have a harley fatboy, ie, solid wheels. Yes you can feel the wind when passing a truck, or more noticable, when crossing a long bridge on a very windy day. Although it's not as bad as what some make it out, I just felt a little push through the bars, but still very controlable. It maybe worse on a lighter bike, HD's are a bit heavy. I replaced my front wheel more because I don't like the look of a solid wheel on the front.
 

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I have a harley fatboy, ie, solid wheels. Yes you can feel the wind when passing a truck, or more noticable, when crossing a long bridge on a very windy day. Although it's not as bad as what some make it out, I just felt a little push through the bars, but still very controlable. It maybe worse on a lighter bike, HD's are a bit heavy. I replaced my front wheel more because I don't like the look of a solid wheel on the front.
There we go...............from someone who knows, thanks.
 

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Workin' to ride
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My 900 Custom has a solid back wheel just like everyone else's. Much more stable in the wind than my 500 Ltd with wire spokes. It's the weight of the bike and size of the windshield that makes the difference I think.
 

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2x the bike for 1/2 the $
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I'm pretty sure its the solid front wheel that would be the subject of issues when it comes to cross winds, as it is the one with the least amount of weight on it when you're riding and it is basically on a swivel giving the wind the ability to cause changes in direction/angle, whereas the rear wheel is locked in a fixed direction.
 

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Workin' to ride
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I'm pretty sure its the solid front wheel that would be the subject of issues when it comes to cross winds, as it is the one with the least amount of weight on it when you're riding and it is basically on a swivel giving the wind the ability to cause changes in direction/angle, whereas the rear wheel is locked in a fixed direction.
Gotcha...also the one that's attached to those bars we push and pull on to change directions! :tongue:
 

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Gotcha...also the one that's attached to those bars we push and pull on to change directions! :tongue:
Yes...as opposed to the twisty thing to go fast and the squeezy thing to stop.
 

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I like the look of solid rims but a friend said that they catch too much wind and the bike gets pushed around when its windy or from a tractor trailer.
There is a bit to it. If you live in a windy area at all avoid the solid wheel. You will spend a bit of time fighting the wind for the bike. It isn't worth it for the looks.
 

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Need Time To Ride
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I'd be more concerned with the difference in unsprung weight and the effect on the ride than wind hitting a solid wheel. The 900 solid rear wheel isn't a wind problem cuz it's surrounded on both sides by things to break up the wind.
 

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The real question is:
Where can one buy solid rims for a Vulcan (1500)

-Rusty
Someone makes solid discs that attach over the spokes to hide them and give the apperance of solid wheels, but you'd have to shop for them
I'd be more concerned with the difference in unsprung weight and the effect on the ride than wind hitting a solid wheel. The 900 solid rear wheel isn't a wind problem cuz it's surrounded on both sides by things to break up the wind.
A fatboy front wheel is fairly light, it's really hollow inside. On the rear, yes it don't matter much at all, especailly for thoughs like me who have saddlebags.
 

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My thought: the more likely wind catcher is going to be the rider than the wheel, especially when you're talking down at road level where cross winds from a bridge would often be blocked by the safety barriers - especially cement ones.

Between a large motor, saddle bags and the tank, there's a lot of stuff to catch crosswinds even taking the rider out of the mix.

Plus, some bikes have pretty sizable front rotors on them, which block a lot of the empty wheel space anyway. The rear wheel on something like a Nomad is pretty well blocked by the pipes and luggage. Something like a Goldwing has large discs and mag wheels, with relatively small openings, which can't possibly let that much wind go through.

Finally, I would think incorrect tire pressure and wheel balance are likely to cause more stability issues.
 
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