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I think my dad is finally ready to let go of his bike and let me resurect it. It's a Spirit of America bike and it's been sitting for 20+ years. I can't seem to find any info for this bike. I know the production numbers are low. My dad worked at Kawasaki at the time this bike was built, that's how he got it. I remember him telling me long ago that most of them were riden down to St Louis from the Lincoln plant and so many of them had 450+ miles on them from the start, he got his right from the factory and if I remember right it still has less than 1,000 original miles. I don't really care what it's worth because I don't want to sell it, I just want to keep it as factory as possible to keep the history going. If you have any info on these bikes it would be appreciated.
Thanks, Matt.
 

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I'm glad you want to keep the bike, it should stay in the family if your Dad had a part in Kawasaki back then.

The Spirit bikes had a unique paint job and I thought were nice, but unfortunately they are not as popular as many owners want to believe. The demand for them is quite low, they didn't hit the right chord with American riders, I think due to the whole Japanese-American prejudices at the time among the motorcycle riders. Here was a Jap bike decked out in good old American Red, White and Blue, and it didn't fly. I haven't seen anything written about them since the 70's.

You see them pop up on Ebay once in a while, being touted as rare and desirable bikes, generally for astronomic asking prices, and they rarely sell. They are worth as much or probably less than a regular, stock, KZ from that time. It's kind of like a Ford Edsel....

Get it running and take care of her, it has more sentimental value for you than monetary, and your Dad will get a kick seeing you ride it.
 

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After 20 years, pay special attention to anything rubber or plastic. Tiny cracks will appear as those parts slowly dry out over the years.

I'm looking forward to seeing pics of the bike, and watching the restoration process. :D
 

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They were made in 78 to celebrate the opening of the Lincoln Neb plant. 200 were produced. They came with the red, white and blue paint job and a Vetter fairing with lowers, as well as Vetter saddlebags. They also came equipped with the LTD seat. Other than that they were just a standard KZ1000 A model. As Kent said they are not anything super desirable and don't seem to fetch a ton of money. That said, I wouldn't mind having one as the KZ1000 A was a very nice riding bike. It is certainly worth spending a few bucks on it to get it in first class shape, you can put alot of trouble free miles on that bike.
 

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I just bought a 1978 KZ750B3 as a parts bike for my 1977 KZ750B2 when I noticed that it has a factory applied white painted tank with thin blue-red-red-blue stripes above the emblem, even the emblem is colored blue on red rather than black on white. Then I remembered that during the late 1970s, Lincoln, Nebraska plant produced a limited amount of KZ1000/KZ750/KZ650 "Spirit of America" editions with Windjammer fairings with Kawasaki logo.
I think mine is one of them and I too would like to know more, including photos so I can restore it back to original rather than breaking it apart. There was a quick roadtest and photos of the KZ1000 version in one of the motorcycle magazines back then but I can't remember which issue.
 

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I just bought a 1978 KZ750B3 as a parts bike for my 1977 KZ750B2 when I noticed that it has a factory applied white painted tank with thin blue-red-red-blue stripes above the emblem, even the emblem is colored blue on red rather than black on white. Then I remembered that during the late 1970s, Lincoln, Nebraska plant produced a limited amount of KZ1000/KZ750/KZ650 "Spirit of America" editions with Windjammer fairings with Kawasaki logo.
I think mine is one of them and I too would like to know more, including photos so I can restore it back to original rather than breaking it apart. There was a quick roadtest and photos of the KZ1000 version in one of the motorcycle magazines back then but I can't remember which issue.
Sorry to say Ted but your bike did not come from the factory painted like that. I was working in a Kawasaki dealership back then and there were no special edition 750's ever made then. I don't believe they ever even made the 750 twins in the Lincoln plant but I could be wrong on that. Check your VIN# unless it starts with a 5 at the beginning of the number sequence it is made in Japan.
 

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Thanks for the info. I wasn't sure if Lincoln assembled the KZ750B models either. My VIN starts with a "2" so I guess it's from Japan but I'm still confused about the gas tank. It looks factory applied with "Spirit of America" style colors. It's a stardard LTD style KZ750B3 tank in white, with dark red color underneath, which is the correct color for that year. I wonder if this was a factory demo model that was cancelled. The tank striping is too perfect to be hand applied (probably came from the KZ1000 version, along with the emblems and the red and blue colors on the emblems weren't painted over). And there are mounting bolts for the Vetter fairing and saddlebags. Maybe they considered making the KZ750 (and KZ650) versions of the Spirit of America editions until the KZ1000 versions didn't sell well (like the 1977 Confederate Editions of Harleys). I can't imagine anybody would bother making this version for private reasons. I still think this could be a one-off Spirit of America KZ750B model but I could be wrong.
 

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The Spirit bikes were built for the 78 model year and as you have already noted they didn't sell very well. I had one sitting around the dealership for what seemed like forever. As to the striping the spirit bikes used decals and were really pretty cheesy, so inproving on them wouldn't take much. Vetter also produced accessories for Kawasaki during this time that were sold through their accessory catalog. I think what you have is a bike that was owned by someone who liked the look of the Spirit bikes and just decided to replicate it on a 750. Post up some pics of it, I'd be interested to see what it looks like.
 

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The bike is in pieces now, getting cleaned up but I'll post the photos when I get a chance. The tank stripes on my bike is not a decal, nor paint but real thin vinyl type (thinner than the ones you get from an auto shop) but spacing between stripes are perfect so they were applied as a unit.
 

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The bike is in pieces now, getting cleaned up but I'll post the photos when I get a chance. The tank stripes on my bike is not a decal, nor paint but real thin vinyl type (thinner than the ones you get from an auto shop) but spacing between stripes are perfect so they were applied as a unit.
The vinyl stripes are no problem, I knew a guy that owned a vinyl shop and he did such things on a daily basis. My favorite was the Yosemity Sam he did on a race car, took him three days.

Like Andy said, the KZ1000 was the only Spirit of America model made, and it was strictly a cosmetic job that's easily duplicated.
 

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Hey, thanks all the same. Now that I'm convinced that it's not a one-off Spirit of America model, I'm still going to restore it as is, minus the Vetter touring gear. The bike looks a little like the 1974 Triumph T160 with a white tank, which was my favorite British triples, other than the BSA/Triumph Vetter Hurricane.
 
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