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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had their spoked wheels sealed? Thinking about having mine done by a company named Wheel Works. Do the tires actually work without tubes? Thanks.

windman
 

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98' 1500 Classic
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Dunno if it works and never heard of it. I guess I would ask, why? why go to the expense of getting the rims worked over rather than just run tubes.
 

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900 LT
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Dunno if it works and never heard of it. I guess I would ask, why? why go to the expense of getting the rims worked over rather than just run tubes.
I love spokes, any bike i buy must have spoke wheels however there are some drawbacks to having to run tubes.

the biggest one is you cant plug a tire to get you home.

yes i run tubes and prolly will continue to run tubes as sealing is expensive.
 

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My hat is made of tinfoil
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I do my own rims, and have for customers to.

Its time consuming, but easy.

I love having my wheels converted to tubeless.
 

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Wannabe Poser
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Here's an article on it. Seal motorcycle wire-spoke wheels to use safer tubeless tires | Motorcycle Cruiser Magazine Article at Automotive.com
Read this also about the wheel. Interesting Didn't know this
tubeless tyres are perfectly okay to mount on tube type rims, you must use a tube however. The big negative when doing is that the speed rating is reduced by one level, i.e. a V rated tyre is in effect now an H rated tyre when a tube is used. On the otherhand, that negative is rather diminished in that most bikes with wire wheels probably won't be run at a steady state at that sort of speed. Keep in mind when considering sealing the nipples on a wire wheel. Not all rims are capable, i.e the beadseat must be of the right profile. If the imprint on the rim does not include the letters MT (together) the beadseat of the rim is not compatable to a tubeless tyre with regards to making a seal to hold air. I do have a question regarding what you were trying to say when, "Another characteristic of spoke wheels is they tend to be lighter than the solid billet type wheels and because the wheel's mass is concentrated largely at the rim... rather than closer to the hub... it takes more energy to accelerate or stop your motorcycle." I'm not quite sure which is heavier at the rim. I think you're trying to say that the wire wheel rim is lighter than that portion of the billet wheel. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Usually modern cast rims are very close in weight in this area, forged and machined can be lighter, sometimes a a lot! With best regards, Kennie Buchanan, Buchanan's Spoke & Rim
Comments: Pros and Cons of Spoke Motorcycle Wheels
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dunno if it works and never heard of it. I guess I would ask, why? why go to the expense of getting the rims worked over rather than just run tubes.
I got a flat last summer. Cost me more for towing than for tire repair. I was only 15 miles from home but it still turned out to be a real p.i.t.a. If I had been 1500 miles from home, in the middle of the night, on a secondary road.... Not a comforting thought. With tubes you can't repair the tire on the road. Your only choice is to call a tow truck.

If I could afford to buy new cast rims that's what I'd do... Sealing my spoke rims will cost about $180 + shipping; new cast rims would cost about $1,800 minimum.

windman
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I love spokes, any bike i buy must have spoke wheels however there are some drawbacks to having to run tubes.

the biggest one is you cant plug a tire to get you home.

yes i run tubes and prolly will continue to run tubes as sealing is expensive.
I much prefer the look of spoke wheels too. But at this point I'm willing to give that up for safety and convenience.

windman
 

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My hat is made of tinfoil
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I got a flat last summer. Cost me more for towing than for tire repair. I was only 15 miles from home but it still turned out to be a real p.i.t.a. If I had been 1500 miles from home, in the middle of the night, on a secondary road.... Not a comforting thought. With tubes you can't repair the tire on the road. Your only choice is to call a tow truck.

If I could afford to buy new cast rims that's what I'd do... Sealing my spoke rims will cost about $180 + shipping; new cast rims would cost about $1,800 minimum.

windman
On long trips I carry tools and spare tubes, and a patch kit to, and fix my own on the side of the road.

Beats being stranded in the midle of nowhere.
 

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I have a classic with spoke wheels and tubes. Had a flat about 45 minutes from home, I plugged it with plug kit I always keep with me. I had to quadruple up on the plugs( ran over a key of all things). I made it home fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
On long trips I carry tools and spare tubes, and a patch kit to, and fix my own on the side of the road.

Beats being stranded in the midle of nowhere.
How do you patch a tube without taking the tire off, and how do you do that on the side of the road??

windman
 

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How do you patch a tube without taking the tire off, and how do you do that on the side of the road??

windman
You take the tire off, he said he had tools. Bike probably has a center stand...



most cruiser guys would probably never attempt it, but if you've ever ridden dirt bikes or dual sports, changing or patching a tube on the side of the road/trail is just part of a normal ride. :wink:



from here...
Neduro's Tire Changing Class - ADVrider
 

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IBA#34418
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Yeah you don't see many cruisers with center stands any more. The bead on my 900's can be hard to break with bead breaker. I can't imagine being able to do it on the side of the road.
 

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How do you patch a tube without taking the tire off, and how do you do that on the side of the road??

windman
Take the wheel off, then the tire halfway off, pull tube out.
Fell around inside tire for debris, and remve any you find......also look at the outside for whatever you might find like a nail, staple etc.
If the hole is big put a patch on the inside of the tire to.
Fix tube, or if carrying a new tube as I sometimes do, change it.
Reinstall, reinflate and ride on.
 

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My hat is made of tinfoil
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Yeah you don't see many cruisers with center stands any more. The bead on my 900's can be hard to break with bead breaker. I can't imagine being able to do it on the side of the road.
Most of my bikes have no center stand so I lean them against something on the non stand side, or better yet jam a log or such on the non stand side right near the swingarm pivot area.
Loosen the axle bolt first, so not wrenching hard on the bike.

For tough beads, use your feet and stomp on the bead area to break it loose, or a log leveraged under something if it still won't break.

On long trips i often needs tires as I go due to wear, so then if camping do it in the evening by the fire, or if at a motel in the parking lot.
 
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