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Discussion Starter #1
It's me again Margret.

2007 Nomad, 12k miles, only had it 6 weeks
Sorry I have so many (what seem like stupid) questions, but I'm new to these bikes. Worked on mine all my life, but been different brands. And I only get to see mine on the wknd.
So I put the 55w in my spots, I know - too much. After a ride spots are not coming on now. It looks like they are wired into the right side turn signal running light (one of the quick splice connectors) then it's split into both spots. I'm not fond of this set up and am thinking of going the wiring harness w/relay route (Universal Wiring and Relay Kit for Controlling Motorcycle Auxiliary Lights (Standard or Deluxe Kit)). My question is, for anyone who has gone this way, will the wattage matter on the bulbs then? I like the brightness of the 55w.

#2
In investigating the spots being out I got to looking at junction box, everything looked ok but the tail fuse, it's not a 10w but a 40w. And its no where near tight, it just kinda rattles around in the socket. I'm thinking too this probably isn't good, even though tail/brake lights work.
 

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When people start randomly drawing power for heavy loads like spots from just anywhere, they are asking for trouble.

Kawasaki does over-design for safety but there are limits. They relay kit is a good way to go but you can also run your own wires back to the accessory fuse, if it is not already in use. The relay must be able to handle the current it is switching and it very likely does. Ask the seller if their kit can handle two 55 watt spots.

According to Partzilla the biggest fuse your bike should have is 30 amps, so get that 40 out of there. I doubt the 30 was intended for the tails so going from 15 to 40 is a huge no-no. The fuses are there to protect the wires. When you go to a larger fuse, you risk a wiring harness melt-down or your bike catching fire.

You will also need to tighten the loose fit of the fuse socket and I am not sure if you can do this without splitting the junction box. I split mine and it is not for the faint of heart but I had no choice. While I was in there I was easily able to tighten up loose fuse sockets by tweaking with a pair of pliers. See below for a picture of mine when it was apart.

41493
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks WFO
Didn't think you could crack the junction box, thought it would be a sealed unit. Good to know, I'm either not faint of heart or stupid cause that's what I'll probably do. Yeah, kinda figured the 40 was too much, I put a 25w in (what I had) and will go back with what's recommended before I ride again, but it just rattles. I may take the junction box out and with me during the week (work out of town & stay there during week).

Will definitely ask if wiring harness will handle 55w.

Found a toggle with cut wires in my left side cover. May have been running some of the engine light things and possibly fuse tapped that one.

Thanks again WFO-KZ!
 

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On my 1984 the J-box was held together with 4 or 5 snap-lock tabs. A bit of careful prying in the right places and it will pop open. Be very careful opening it. The copper traces are stamped and are not bonded to the substrate board. They will literally fall out of place and then it will be like trying to piece together a jig saw puzzle. Much easier if you can separate the halves without the traces falling out of position and take lots of pictures so you can put it back together easily and correctly. I have added a couple more photos to give you a better idea of what you are in for. Considering it was not sealed and is 36 years old, there was surprisingly little corrosion. Given all contacts a shot of Deoxit while you are in there.
41494

41495
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the direction brother!
Keep the rubber down!
 
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