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Discussion Starter #1
My old mobile phone finally died and I just ordered a new one that has both bluetooth and a built in MP3 player. As a result, I'm interested in people's experiences and recommendations for a stereo bluetooth headset.

I considered going hard wired, but I eventually plan to get a new GPS and most of those have bluetooth rather than a headphone output and I'd like to be able to hear both through the headset. Of course, if someone has a recommendation for a sub-$150 GPS that has a headphone jack, I'll take that too. I just don't know of any.

I wouldn't mind a headset with both hard wired connections and bluetooth capability since that would save on battery life if I don't need to access a bluetooth device on a particular ride.

I'll also consider hard wired units that can add bluetooth capability later.

A bonus would be the ability to connect to other bluetooth headsets of other riders in a group, but I can live without that.

Battery life is pretty important since I'm not going to be able to power the unit off the bike. At least 5 hours would be desirable.

I'd like to stay under $100, though I'll consider a bit more. Honestly, I can do without bluetooth if I really need to - I just prefer it. However, if it's going to break the bank, it's just not worth it.

Thanks in advance.
 

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make sure your phone actually can output stereo to bluetooth- not all of them can. Even if you have stereo bluetooth headphones the output of the device is also a factor.

Sub 150 GPS w/ a headphone jack- I have a Mio, it's a couple years old now but it was only 150 bucks at Radio Shack. Has a built in MP3 player and a slot for one of those micro SD cards that you can drop your tunes onto.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
make sure your phone actually can output stereo to bluetooth- not all of them can. Even if you have stereo bluetooth headphones the output of the device is also a factor.

Sub 150 GPS w/ a headphone jack- I have a Mio, it's a couple years old now but it was only 150 bucks at Radio Shack. Has a built in MP3 player and a slot for one of those micro SD cards that you can drop your tunes onto.
Does that GPS all you to customize a route in some kind of mapping software (add waypoints, etc.)?

That's my one issue with my Garmin Nuvi: you can select avoidances and go from one POI to another, but you can't plot a specific route. However, I'm not willing to pay $300 or more to get that capability. At least with my Nuvi, it does a good job of plotting a route if the avoidances are set up properly. It just would be nice to be able to modify that route.
 

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No, I can't plan routes, which is the only downside of it. I do it the semi old fashioned way- map it out and write down directions and turns and distances in notepad, print it out, and tape it to my windshield. Then I use the GPS to watch for the turns.
 

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Well, I've decided to go a different route:

I opted to upgrade the GPS and go with a cheaper phone instead. I caught a deal on a Garmin Nuvi 780 for $178.00 at Amazon.com (the sale ends tomorrow, in case anyone is looking).

This model has the following features missing from my Nuvi 200:

- Bluetooth
- An MP3 Player
- A headphone jack (meaning I can listen to tunes without bluetooth or hear the directions in the helmet).
- The ability to edit routes and add stops along the way - meaning I can tailor a route instead of just taking what I'm given or having to use POI's in a series to get where I want to go.
- It offers traffic info, though it's a subscription thing, so I doubt I'll use it.
- It speaks street names.
- It can interface with a bluetooth phone to control it - and the audio can be sent through the phone.
- It offers both ABC and QWERTY on screen keyboards.
- In a car, it can send the audio through the car stereo.
- Apparently it does voice recognition, too if the phone supports it.

While I don't plan to use the phone while riding, by interfacing with it, the GPS will show if someone is calling. So, while I likely wouldn't pick up, I can pull over somewhere and call back if I want. The audio jack means I can use a regular wired headset. Finally, it means I can blow off the more expensive MP3 player phone and just get a very basic cheap one that just makes calls (but still has bluetooth).

Thanks for the input from those that responded. I feel this was the better - and actually cheaper - route than going with a bluetooth headset system for the audio. I still can, but it's nice to not have to.
 
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