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Discussion Starter #1
Ispeed, QKENUF, Knighrider,
Someone?! For those of you who have supported me in this project, thought I'd let ya know that day one of the 700's tear down began yesterday. I have helped my teen work on her science fair crud all day, so the Kawi has been patiently waiting in the garage.

Okay. Took all four carbs off yesterday and Yes, I kept them together. Got the throttle cables off without incident, and that had me a bit worried before I'd really seen what they were all about. Piece of cake! :wink:

Anyway, took the top and bottom off the first one, and by the time I got back to it, (after feeding kids supper etc.) the inside had a green coating to it. Looked like extremely fine light green chalk had formed a film on the inside. Like I said, extrememly fine, like a dusting, but I've never seen the inside of the carb before, except years ago on my 79'Cutlass..... Is this a normal thing, or is it sediment that means something else? Just checking. Also, the rubber diaphram on the inside.... I know not to clean it with carb cleaner, but when I'm reassembling, do I coat it with anything or is it good to go back in after a soap and water cleaning? Didn't submerge it, just put a tiny bit of soapy water on my hand and gently rubbed it then wiped it back off.

And finally, what gunk is on there for sealing it when you reasemble the top cap and bottom bowl? I noticed when pulling them off that there was a sealant on there. Please be patient with my questions, as I'm waiting for my manual!
 

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Green smog !!!

Hi Queen
The green coating you see, if we are talking about the parts of the carb, is probably just oxidation. When the gas dries out on a metal surface, it oxidises and dries somethimes to a white powder, in this case, green, maybe due to the dye in the gas you use or one of the additives put in by the oil company. Some people for the winter, store their bikes by shutting off the fuel and running the engine till the carb runs out of fuel and the engine dies. thats how you build up oxidation, and eventually it will clog the carb. You need not worry about it cuz its apart. Just clean the parts and if you like, upon assembly, put a light coat of oil on them. Poof, no more oxidation. If your talking about the accellerator pump diaphragm, If I were you, I would replace it while its apart. They have been known to dry up and crack. If it is made of neophreen rubber, when you replace it, dont put any sealer on it and dont tighten the screws too much, youll crush the gasget. When assembling the bowl, there should be a gasget or rubber o'ring between the bowl and the body of the carb. You wont need sealer on it. If you can, see if you could pick up the factory shop manual for that bike. You could order it from the manufacturer. Its a lot more technical than a clymers. And dont worry, I have the patience of a saint. LOL
 

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the "fun" guy
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Knightrider said:
If you can, see if you could pick up the factory shop manual for that bike. You could order it from the manufacturer. Its a lot more technical than a clymers. And dont worry, I have the patience of a saint. LOL

Ahem....She has been "hunting" for a manual for this bike with no success. If you know of a place to order one...she would be eternally grateful.
 

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do you think that that repair manual site you posted previously will have a manual whistle?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Spok,
I think I will. I just had someone tell me that the 750's and 700's are the same exact engine. I'll let ya know if this works.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Knightrider:
Thank you so much, I'll be keeping ya posted. Busy asking more questions too I'm sure. I called Kawasaki, JC Whitney, went on ebay and even posted a "Want it Now" ad, and nothing. The manuals are out of print and no longer available for this make and model.

Spok, I've not looked into the Hanes before, because any experience I've had with them is that if it seems too complicated, it will tell ya to consult the local repair shop. I can consult the repair shop by myself. Clymers does the entire process with ya.
But, it's probably gonna be better than nothing right?
 

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I have seen you say you have a 700LTD? Is it different from other 700's? I have seen the manuals on Ebay for the 700, but never seen the 700LTD listed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
rwrighter:
Thanks for responding. I think the problem here (someone correct me if I'm wrong) is that most of the 700's are Vulcans. My LTD was only made for 2 years, and is almost 20 years old, thus an additional problem in trying to find it's manual. Aftermarket manufacturers who continually print these vintage manuals don't seem to be printing mine.......... :(
Anyway, it is an 85' so if anyone finds "THE" manual, shoot the link my way please!
I'd be very appreciative.
 

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Chromequeen
sounds like Knightrider has you pointed in the right direction mechanically, that's good. he is a better reference for that stuff that i will ever be. just keep letting us know how it is going, and as always, don't hesitate to ask.
 

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Chromequeen,i really admire you! You are a real go getter,aren't you? I just wish i was close enough to reach out and give you a hand getting that bike ready for the road!! I have read your other post concerning your bike problems,and i can tell you are determind(is that spelled right?)to fix that thing yourself! I am pulling for you and cheering you on!! You go girl!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You know what Kenny?
Sometimes that is just what a person needs to hear to keep them going. I was quickly running out of confidence and energy, and that boosted my confidence enough to keep going.

I've not worked on vehicles in quite some time; to be honest I'm thankful that ours are newer now so I don't have to. My husband felt horrible because (although he has many talents, mechanics is not one of them) at one time, I was 9 months pg, with a sun umbrella over me putting the brakes on our oldsmobile so I could safely get to the hospital! That was 8 years ago, and thankfully we've not had a lot of vehicle problems for me to have to contend with since then. But now we're trying to get enough saved to buy a newer home close to my husband's job, and so this bike (financially) is on the back burner. But my desire to be riding, has literally driven me to do this without having to take it to a mechanic. Some could say that I should give it up, but I don't have to care what those people's opinion is, right? Some way or another I'll have this bike up and running so I can be living my dream of having a bike and riding.....
I'll have to just keep leaving my pride away from this computer and continue to ask many questions. Most people on here are so genuine that it makes the pride issue not so hard to deal with. I'm very fortunate to have found this forum.
Thanks for the vote of confidence Kenny, and all of the rest of you who are pulling for me to get the 700 back on the road!!!

Chromequeen
 

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Go Girl !!!!

You get that bike going !
I have learned that patience and time produce good results.

Keep us posted and good luck with the mission :)

Taz
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Helicoils....... Anyone done one?

Okay... What number are we on for questions now? LOL :p :wink:
Anyone used a Helicoil for a sparkplug before? I've had very different views on the subject. I don't want to have to pay $400. - $500. to have that head removed. Has anyone used one on the head and had good success? I've been told to tap it in, and be careful to put a smaller hose on a vacuum and vac out the tiny shavings, I had another guy who said to put "rope" down in the hole (that sounds a bit off to me.......) and it would catch the shavings, and the last person said to pack the cylinder with "grease" and then extract it after the helicoil is successfully in.
Any takers? Come on, don't be shy!!!
I know the risks in this, but also want opinions as to what I should do... Is it possible and or feasible to do this, and who has had successes?
 

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the "fun" guy
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While I have never done a heli coil....the idea of grease placed in and around the area is one I have read about from other mechanics as it will catch any shavings and hold them. The trick then is to remove the grease and not leave any behind that may contain any metal particles. I wonder if a small one gallon wet/dry vacum could help remove the grease? Or something with enough suction to get it all out. Of course the nozzle would need to be small enough to get into a small area. Just a thought.
 

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My experience with helicoils is that they work great if there aren't too many temperature cyles. The problem is that helicoils are tempered spring steel, and over time loose strength with hot, cold, hot, cold. In situations like a spark plug thread, my thoughts are: 1) have you tried to run a tap with the same threads as the spark plug in the hole? They may be difficult to find, but the several I have were made by Armstrong Tools. 2) If that doesn't work, SERIOUSLY think about using a threaded insert instead of a helicoil. An insert is threaded inside and outside, requires a slightly bigger hole, uses standard threads instead of "special" helicoil threads, will not lose strength over time, and allows for a threading tap to be used to clean out threads in the future while a helicoil requires replacement (which is more difficult than the original installation!). As far as the metal shavings are concerned, I usually do just the opposite of the suggestions you have been given: instead of trying to collect the shavings in a blind hole (a cylinder with the piston still in it), hook a small hose, like the plastic hose under the kitchen or bathroom sink to the OUTLET of the vacuum (break out the duct tape) and blow air INTO the hole. Then, when using the tap, turn it in 3/4 turn, back it out 1/2 turn. In 3/4, out 1/2. By backing it out you will break off the metal chips and the air pressure from the vacuum will blow them out along the flutes (the depressed non-cutting part) of the tap before they have a chance to fall into the hole! This process works for drilling as well as tapping, but for drilling, don't go backwards, just reduce pressure on the drill and the chips break off. Would this be possible if the air is blown in through, say, the intake valve?
 

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My LTD was only made for 2 years, and is almost 20 years old, thus an additional problem in trying to find it's manual. Aftermarket manufacturers who continually print these vintage manuals don't seem to be printing mine.......Chromequeen


Unfortunately, like everyone else here, I've had no luck finding "the manual". But when I stopped by my local public library last Sat. to get the dreaded tax forms, I thought of you, went upstairs and looked around. I found manuals for '78 Kaw twins, '85-89 Honda fours, etc. So I suggest everyone stop by the library sometime, look around the 600 section, and see what you find.

Q: BTW, where's the card catalogue?
A: blah, blah
Q: Computers?!? You're kidding. Doesn't anyone think anymore?
A: You haven't been here in a while, have you?

True exchange!
 
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