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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Harley guy here and I only prefer the older ones as I have 2 shovelheads, I have owned every motorcycle ever made I think. Started out on a Triumph Bonneville with a hell of a chopper front end on it and went through everything from Honda's to Kawasaki's along the way.
Found an old KE G5 a few years back so I've been tinkering with it, I've rebuilt many motors and a few transmissions so not entirely new to working on them. I have a few metal lathes, nice commercial drill presses and about any tool you could think of I know working on something having the right tool usually makes it easier. We're all 1 busted bolt away from turning a 30 minute job into a 3 day task so I try to avoid that at all cost.
Anyway thanks for having me

Dave
 

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Hey Dave, welcome aboard. You are so right about the 30 minute job turning into a 3 day task. Having the right tools makes all the difference in the world whether its the 3 day task or the 30 minute task.

I also have a metal cutting lathe, two drill presses, welding gear, cutoff saws, a bandsaw and a whack of other tools I have acquired over a lifetime. I cherish them all. Some people laugh at my immense collection of nuts, bolts, washers in carbon steel, and stainless steel, but for me its a huge timesaver not having to run all over town every time you need a nut or bolt. I recently bought a box of assorted sizes of copper washers for $20. I have already needed it on several occasions either for banjo bolts or for oil pan drain bolt washers.
 

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Broken studs and bolts can really ruin your day. I wanted to replacee my stock Suzuku GS750ES exhaust for on I got off of EBAY that was perfect. The studs all snapped. I ended up taking the tank and front end off, chaining the bike to a rafter in my Barn, and drilled out every stud. I pulled out the threads with heavy duty needle nose pliers. To never have this problem again, I Heli-Coiled all eight holes, and used #8 bolts to tighten the exhaust. No leaks, and now removeable. I too have a shop in my Barn, Mig and Tig welder, Milling Machine, 9" Southbend BackGear lathe, compound rotary tables, etc.. I am the cheapest person I know. I make most of what I need. Saves a lot of money. This is a great forum. I'm new here too. Many good people, and I've received a lot of help, and have helped as much as I can. I really like the give and take nature of this forum. Welcome. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just used my TIG on my 71 Harley Electra glide as the thread was stripped out on the exhaust side of the head, I went slow as I thought I might burn right through it but it filled in like butter. Drilled and tapped back out and been great ever since. I often wonder if I like working on them about as much as I like riding them as long as everything goes halfway within the plan.
 

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Me too. I use Heli-Coils on stripped threads. The reason is that the new threaded hole, with the Heli-Coil insert is stronger than the original, and with welding, depending where you are doing it, can warp the case.

I do agree about fixing to this level. It's a great feeling of satisfaction, and you know the repair works because you did it. :)
 
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