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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a brother who is a masochist. A few years ago he bought a brand new Ural with sidecart, which after the first couple years turned into one headache after another. He's now decided he is done fixing the Ural, and wants to buy a Triumph Bonneville 100 and bolt the sidecart to it.

Anyone here familiar with the Triumph's? Are they reliable? Do any of the models come with a sidecart?
 

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Modern Triumphs are very well built (in my opinion much superior to my VN900) and speaking from personal experience of my Bonneville, no reliability issues at all. I've seen sidecar variants of other models but only from third party construction.
 

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Modern Triumphs are very well built (in my opinion much superior to my VN900) and speaking from personal experience of my Bonneville, no reliability issues at all. I've seen sidecar variants of other models but only from third party construction.

BE, do you have any idea if parts are interchangeable between the Bonneville and the Scrambler?
 

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I have 3 Trumpets, A 56, a 65 I raced flat track on and a 68 bobber in great condition, rode the 65 coast to coast twice but than again I do my own work. If British engineering is your thing, dive right in, if not stay away....very far away. that kind of cool takes a lot of work.
 

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meanie said
BE, do you have any idea if parts are interchangeable between the Bonneville and the Scrambler?
Yes, some parts are interchangeable but I'm not the expert on which. Check out the forum at http://www.triumphrat.net/twin-talk/

BGRNYRZ said
I have 3 Trumpets, A 56, a 65 I raced flat track on and a 68 bobber in great condition, rode the 65 coast to coast twice but than again I do my own work. If British engineering is your thing, dive right in, if not stay away....very far away. that kind of cool takes a lot of work.
My experience is with modern Triumphs which I find to be extremely reliable and well built although of course YMMV. Point taken on older machines though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm more interested in comments regarding the modern Triumphs. I think we all have heard the horror stories about this brand in the '60s. Where are the modern ones made? Are they really British or are they just designed there and made elsewhere. It doesn't really matter where they are made, but I'm wondering about parts interchange and availability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Biker, since you have the exact model he is looking for (T100), how do they ride? Are they reasonable good highway drivers? His current Ural doesn't go much above 50 mph.
 

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El Zorro said "Biker, since you have the exact model he is looking for (T100), how do they ride? Are they reasonable good highway drivers? His current Ural doesn't go much above 50 mph."
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For me they give a classic ride in a classical riding position which is why I bought it, Some people like to mess around with the front suspension, rear shock breakers or chain sprocket ratios but I like it fine just as it is. Some people change the T100 seats for the Scrambler seat but again I like it the way it is.

There are probably better highway bikes if you're looking for coast to coast travel (if it were me I'd look at a BMW F 800 or R 1200 for example) but that's not the reason to buy a Bonneville T100.

I like the Bonneville T100 as a really nice jump on and ride, responsive, feel good factor bike - not a modern sports bike, not a conventional street bike and not a cruiser. There are other much faster bikes including the Triumph range but 80mph plus or whatever you want in reason comes up plenty fast enough for me.

Somewhere there's a way to find out if each bike is made in the UK or Malaysia. I suspect mine is made in Malaysia but never bothered to find out as for me it's not an important factor. The engines in the Bonneville and Scrambler are similar but the Bonneville is a 360 deg crank and the Scrambler is a 270 deg crank.

The Kawasaki VN900 is used for when Mrs. BikerEm and I want to go out together but for a solo ride I usually chose the T100. The bike is in its element on back roads. Some people use the T100 two up but we think it's too cosy for two full grown adults. A couple of teenagers or parent and child are fine but otherwise we think it's a tad too cozy.

The Triumph that I saw with a sidecar was the earlier generation three cylinder Thunderbird which is a bike I regret not buying when I had a chance a few years ago (sans sidecar). The new Thunderbird is a very different beast. I think the Bonneville would be physically a bit small for a sidecar although it would not surprise me if it's been done already
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the great input BikerEm. I'll pass this along to my brother. Enjoy the ride!
 

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Why does your brother insist on being punished so much?
 

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Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bon..... :shock: ...err sorry! That a print out of my brain ever since I sat on one at the dealership, and then I saw and heard THIS:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNbyAY8Ryjw

Now I can't think about anything else, only "Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville Bonneville B" ...uhh...sorry there I go again...
 

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Why not get a W650? Then there is no worry about reliability. I bought a leftover 2000 in 01 and still have it. In that time I replaced the plugs 3 times, had a vacuum leak under the tank (held me down to 50mph) and had to replace a rubber seal in the patcock. Oh yes, the rear tire and soon the front tire. I owned a TR6 once, never again. Same with BSA. A Horex is a fantastic bike but parts are a bear outside the Fatherland. At presents the family has a W650, 2000 Vulcan 800 Classic (wifes), 2007 LTD 500 (daughters) and a 68 R60/2 BMW-mine. As I am 70 these are probably the last bikes we'll buy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Why does your brother insist on being punished so much?
http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/images/smilies/icon_lol.gif We all think that! He's always been into the German bikes with sidecars you see in WWII movies. So what he really would like is a BMW setup, but that gets you into real money. The Ural is the less expensive way to get the WWII setup (it's a Russian copy of the BMW), but reliability and performance are circa 1945.
 
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