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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, I have been reading the forums lately, but I have never made a post before. I am trying to do a wheelie on a 1997 Zx6R. It the dry weight is 400 and I am 170 pounds. I have watched both of the tutorial videos that are on youtube and also read many posts saying how it should be done.. but still there are some things I do not understand.

I have been riding for a year and a half now.. I tried wheelies before, but I came down way to hard and it scared me off.. Now I am a bit afraid of flipping the bike so I have not tried dumping the throttle completely yet, I have been working on clutch wheelies and I can bring it up a little bit.. not sure, maybe 10 inches to a foot. I just really want to know how many RPMS I should be trying for in order to get a wheelie going without a high chance of flipping. (I know all wheelies can flip.. but meh)

This is the way I have been doing: (My clutch is very sensitive, the owner before me modified it)

Cover back break :biggrin:
Accelerate to 25mph at 5-6k RPM.
(within a second or 2)
Let go of throttle
Pull clutch with two fingers.
Throttle to about 9-10k RPM
Completely let go of clutch

(Is this wrong? Should I keep a steady 9k RPM from the start and never let go of throttle untill its up?)

At this time I get a rapid acceleration and sometimes it comes up, other times it does not. If it does come up, it comes up very fast and I may begin to panic and hit the break bringing the bike down.

I believe my issue is with the clutch.. I must not be doing something right.. people say you should slip the clutch, but because my clutch is so sensitive, it is difficult for me. (I may could fix it, but I am no mechanic) I also really want a estimate of how many RPMs I need to be aiming for. (Even though I know people say do not look at the tact.. I just do not want to flip)
 

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don't roll off the throttle, just pull in the clutch faster. start your clutch slip about 1/2 way through the rev band. start out by just tapping it, then pull in a bit more, then a bit more, until you are getting it up in a controllable way. the clutch slip should be relatively fast, about 1 second altogether.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ah.. is that meaning from say.. a stop light or something?
Accelerate aiming at about 10k RPM, when it hits at about 5k, slip the clutch and release? I think I understand, I like to read numbers of rpms :p
 

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yeah. but you can do it cruising at 65 too. But becarefull, start out EASY. Don't concentrate on looking at your tach too much, wheelies are done mostly by feel. Lets say your running 60 mph. down shift to 3rd or maybe second gear. roll the throttle hard and when your about halfway through the gear, slip the clutch while still on the throttle. it will come up if you do slip it hard enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah, I am going to be practicing at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte parking lot this next couple weeks. Classes are out for the holidays. Thanks for the info!
 

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cover your rear break. also, coming down is just as important as getting it up. slightly roll off and when you start to come down, punch it! It will make a softer landing.
 

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Yeah, I am going to be practicing at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte parking lot this next couple weeks. Classes are out for the holidays. Thanks for the info!
Let us know when you get your degree lol
 

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I'd suggest roll on wheelies in an empty parking lot first though
ah.. is that meaning from say.. a stop light or something?
I'd suggest not doing wheelies on any public road at all, so you don't wipe out into someone's truck or onto the sidewalk. Cops tend to pull you over less this way too.

For that matter, I'd recommend not doing them period, so your don't roast your valvetrain from oil starvation.

For further reading, please search for "wheelie crash" on youtube.
 

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Should you completely drop the clutch after u pull it in, or let it out quickly but controllably?
It depends on the amount of power the bike has. If it's an EX500 you pretty much have to dump the clutch to bring it up. If it's something with more power you can usually let out the clutch and get a feel of where the bike starts feeling light. Most four cylinder sport bikes will wheelie without much more than compressing the fork and giving it gas on the rebound as you pull back on the bike.
 

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Yeah, I am going to be practicing at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte parking lot this next couple weeks. Classes are out for the holidays. Thanks for the info!

Take a buddy with you just in case something were to go bad, you never know. He could also hold the video camera for us also, you know us we like to watch

:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 

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Sort of ironic, when new to sportbikes you want to know how to get the front up;
after you get serious about performance you'll do anything you can to keep it down.

Good luck, +1 on having a cameraman.
 

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Don't look at your tach or speedo when trying wheelies. You must learn to feel the wheelie or you will get into trouble. At most... look at it before you try pop the wheelie, but then forget about it.

As one of the instructional videos says, first get comfortable doing roll-on wheelies or, if your bike doesn't do those, just bouncing the front end up (on the throttle, off, on again).

Once you can do those without getting a fright, move on to clutching it up and just take it one step at a time. Learn to use your ears to understand how much you're revving. First time, pop the clutch and dump it immediately. Second time hold it in just a fraction longer (again, use your ears to gauge how much more you're revving it up compared to the last time) and so on. Personally I try to keep my variables to a minimum, so when I apply throttle I always apply FULL THROTTLE and I just dump the clutch (mind you, I have yet to do a SUSTAINED wheelie, i.e. riding one... at best I've gotten the wheel up probably a good couple of feet but I let it come right down again) because I am not able to consistently "slip" the clutch the same way every time... maybe once I do it a little slower, the next time a little quicker and it doesn't help me understand how much the bike "bites" when you release the clutch... hence I just dump it and try to use my ears as a gauge of how violently the front wheel will come up.

Good luck and keep us posted on your progress :smile:
 
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